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Full text of "73 Magazine (June 1973)"

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A product in the amateur market gets a reputation very quickly. It 

measures up to what you expect in engineering, performance and quality 
—or else. That s why A/S amateur antennas are built to the identical 
design and construction standards as their commercial counterparts. 
Standards that have made them specified for more police and public 
safety vehicle installations than all other brands combined. 



1-177 
2 Meters 

Features new high 
conductivity copper 
and nickel coated 
17-7 PH stainless 
steel whip. Shunt 
fed coil encased in 
waterproof PVC 
jacket. All fittings 
chrome plated brass. 
Easy snap-in 
mounting, 3 dB gain.* 




NEW! HM-223 
1 Va Meters 
(220 MHz) 

High performance 

% wavelength design 
for the new 220 MHz 
activity! Directly fed 
with low loss coil in 
new low-profile 
design. Spring and 
whip easily 
removable leaving 
only 1%6" high base 
for car wash 
clearance. 3 dB gain.* 




-175 

% Meters 

Collinear design 
with truly hot 
performance! Base 
fittings have silver 
plated contacts. Can 
handle 100 watts. 
Whip and phasing 
coil assembly is a one 
piece molded design 
to resist vibration and 
moisture. 5 dB gain.* 



1-4 

2 Meters 

Tough, virtually 

Indestructible 
antenna for hand- 
helds. Completely 
insulated. Base fitting 
matches Motorola 
HT, E.F.Johnson, 
and Standard 
portables. 



1-5 

Same as above but 
for Drake and other 

packset portables 
with SO-239 fittings. 



NEW ASCOM^ TOWERS 

High strength, low maintenance 
aluminum towers for HF and VHF 
antenna installations. There is a 
complete line of ASCOM self- 
supporting towers " in heights from 
30 to 90 feet— at attractive prices! 



*Measured over a Va wavelength whip 

ViRlTE FOR FREE AMATEUR ANTENNA 
and/or TOWER CATALOGS 

the antenna 
^ specialistB 

Stnipes of OMAllty" 

Division of ORION INOUSTRiES, INC., 12435 Eucfid Ave., Cleveland. Ohio 44106 

Export: 2200 Shames Dr., Westbury, L.I., New York 1 1590 Canada: A. C, Simmonds & Sons, Ltd. 





magazine 

for radio amateurs 



#153 JUNE 1973 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Wayne Green W2(MSD/1 
Keith LamomcaW7DXX/l 
Ron Subka WA9FPP/1 
Yvene Grimes WA8ULU/1 

ASSOCIATES 

Gus Browning W4BPD 

Mike FrveWBSLBP 
Bill Hoisington KICLL 
Dave Ingram K4TWJ 
Jim Kyle K5JKX 
Harry Simpson A4SCF 
Bill Turner WA0ABI 
Jim Weil WB6BHI 

PRODUCTION 
Ruthmary Davis 

Karen Hebert 
Biff Mahoney 
Janet Oxiey 
Lynn Panciera-Fraser 
Philip Pr*ce 
Cynthia Schlosser 
Alexandra Schmidt 
Bill Syderman 
Bill Sundbefg 

Bust NESS 

Qigi Sage 

CIRCULATION 
Ace" GoocJwm WIGRO 

Barbara Block 
Dorothy GibSdn 

TRANSPORTATION 
Kurr Schmidt 

PROPAGATION 
John Nelson 

DRAFTING 

T.M.Graham WBFKW 

Bill Morelfo 

Wayne Peeler K4MVW 



FEATURES 

2 Amateur Radio News 
4 Never Say Die W2fSISO/1 
6 SSTV Scene 

6 AMSAT News 

7 FCC News 

8 Hamburglar 

8 50 MH2 Band 

9 73 Reps 

10 Repeater Update 



12 JuneCB Project 

13 DX Footnotes 

14 Looking West 
14 Traveling Ham 

16 Social Events 8i Contests 
7 7 New Products 
21 Letters 
99 Caveat Emptor 
1 44 Pro p agstio n 



«**-p .1+1 



■» » «* 



* **#•»» 



23 Simple Generator lor 222 MHi *...*...... ,,,,.. KICLL 

This three tfans*stor oscillatOT and attenuator will enable you lo tune up a 222 

receiver or antenna and measitre the sensitivity. There are stiK new worlds to 

explore — try 222. 
29 Miniature SO and 40 Meter Antenna ..,..,,,,...... W2EEV 

Brand r>ew idea for the ©Kperfmenter - don't say there isn't anything new that 

amateurs are working on. Get cracking 
37 UHF Output Meter .,.,,,.,,,. 

Accurately measuring rf power at 444 MHi is a problem. 
46 FCC-Approved Repeater AppJication Info ,.,,,,,........ 

Makes nice reading on a sunny afternoon, 
49 Color Stow Scan Television ,.......<.,.*,>-.-« <* 

A system fof direct viewing of color slow scan. What neKt? 
51 BTTY Autoswitch .,.-.. 

Great tot two meiei RTTY 
55 40 Meter Transmitter , , * , . . . . 

Hybrid ng for inexpensive fun on 40 CW, Good Novice ng. 
53 Polar Mount for Moonbounce .,.,«..,.. * * . 

Don*T alf rush to make this up, okay? 
63 The Urban Quad 

Tribander you can make good perfof nni*r, 
05 Understanding Reflected Power , , , ,....,,.,.... W5JJ 

Oddly enough, very few i^ngmeers understand ii. Read and confound the 

experts. 

70 The K20AW Counter Improved ,....,..,«.-.*- — , , v , - . - - . ^ - - * * W9CGI 

Improved accuracy, timebase check, burnout protection, eic. 
75 The Perfect Summer Job ..,..,.., . . . . .WA8IWLG 

A 73 work-ethic special Combine hamming with a vacation and get paid for 



li « » * 



■I- m -w 



. .. m ^ t * V WU 

K4TWJ 

, , , K2VAH 

W4KAE 
.K3MNJ 



it, 



k. ih d ta 



W2EEY 



72 Double Coaxial Angenna , 

Get increased bandwidth wnh this all coaxial folded dipole. 
S3 Won -Falsing Tone Decoder , ^ ,*..,,*,,.**♦ ^ ,-.-... + i ■ , . * ^ » . » - ■ W1ELU 

A circuit that keeps illegal transients from tripping your COR. 
85 Calibrated Signal Strength Meter , , , .,»,*-.- * VE3CES 

Do you calibrate your antenna to the meter or vice versa? 
87 Portable FM Battery Pack ..-.,-. - - ^ - K4YKB 

An easy way to fake it if you can't afford a hand untt. 
91 An In-Circuit Ohmmeter , .... ^ »,,--,,,,.*-*..*..-- - W6HDM 

Tackle squeamish circuits with this low current device, 
95 Amateur Rules and Regulations, Part I ...*•,*-.....,- ^ * * - , . - - FCC 

Who wiil bet that they'll change wtiile weVe in midstream? 



73 Ahi^azirje Ls published monlhly by 73. Inc., Peterborough, New Hampshire 03458. 
Subscription ratcH are $B for one year: in North America and U.S. Zip Code areas overseas, 
$7 per year ekewhere. Three years. $14, and $16 overseas. Second class postage paid at 
Peterborough NH 0S45S and at additional mailing offices. Printed at Menasha. Wisconsin 
54942 LLS.A. Entire contents copynght 1973 by 73 inc Peterborough NH 03458. Phone: 
603-924 3873. Microfilm edition of 73 available from University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Mi 
48106. Magnetic tapes available from Science for the Blind, 332 Rock Hill Rd., Bala 
Cynwyd PA 19904. 



JUNE 1973 



1 




Amateur JRabio 




JUNE MCMLXXitI 



Monthly Ham 



ATLANTA 




WB4CPL 



In the late afternoon of March 31st 
a tornado struck just east of Altanta, 
Georgia, and on fnto South Carolina. 
Hardest hit was Conyers, Georgia. 
Within an hour of learning the extent 
of the damage, the Alford Memonal 
Radio Club declared their Stone 
Mountain Repeater W4B0C {16-76) 
closed to ail but emergency traffic. 

A walkie-talkie was used in the 
Conyers City Hail to provide com- 
munications from the police, fire and 
city officials. Many emergency genera- 
tors were available due to a recent ice 
storm, but the need was for someone 
to keep the large fixed units opera- 
ting. The Rockdale County Hospital 



lost its power plant tO minutes after it 
was started. A ham in north Georgia 

heard KAYGTs report from the hos- 
pital and drove down, as his business 
is mo tor- generators. Wire to operate 
remote functions (water, etc.) at the 
hospital was found by other hams; as 
was gas when they ran out about 2:00 
a«m« 

A new controf was rotated among 
base units near Stone Mountain to 
keep order in the repeater operations. 
The Atlanta Radio Club used its auto- 
patch machine, W4D0X, in down- 
town Atlanta to relieve the load on 
the Conyers phone system. They also 
manned their W4D0C base station in 



the Red Cross building on the 3975 
emergency net relaying messages from 
the Stone Mountain repeater. A pair 
of 30 kW, 400V, 3 phase generators 
was obtained via the relay to W4D0X 
80 meter station from the Army near 
Atlanta. It arrived about 14 hours 
after the tornado struck, to power the 
city water system. 

By the next afternoon most power 
was restored and the hams pulled out 
after a very successful operation. That 
night a thunderstorm blew the Stone 
Mountam machine off the air for a 
much deserved rest 

One of the surprising occurrences 
was the arrival of a group from two 
local Citizens Band clubs with an 
emergency van stocked with first aid 
supplies and an emergency power gen- 
erator but without radios. The non- 
enforcement of regulations by the 
FCC has turned their radios into 
useless junk. It was impossible to use 
1 1 meters on a local basis. They were 
fir?t-aid trained, however, and many a 
ham learned that all CB'ers are not 
brainless dolts. 



FLOOD EFFORTS HONORED 

Sixteen amateur radio operators vwere honored for providing emergency communications during tropical storm 

Agnes between mobile Navy units and 




hBfi to right: Men Mcquste K5HQC. George G^dbois WWEY (pr^ssdem ofSERCOM), 
Don House WA30WD, John Hehnthal WJDWS. Lt. Alien B. Caplan, Commanding 
Officer, LancAsier Naval Reserve C^n^r, K4AVQ; Robert J. V/itnwr KWAX and Barry 
M. Baunmn WA3PTE, 



Civil Defense Headquarters. 

The amateurs are members of 
SERCOM of Lancaster County, Pa,, 
which operates the Lancaster 
146.01-61 2 meter FM repeater 24 
hours a day. A letter of congratulation 
was presented to each of the sixteen 
by Lt Alan B. Caplan, Commanding 
Officer of the Lancaster Naval Reserve 
Center, Alan is also a member of 
SERCOM and his caJl is K4AVa 
Those honored were: Roy Smoker 
K3HLB, Robert J. Witmer K3VAX, 
Barry M. Bauman WA3PTE, Donald 
L House WA30WD, Robert Landis 
WA3JIVIJ, Earl E, Eshleman 
WA3DMH. John Helenthal W3DWS, 
Theodore Schriber W3KKX, Clyde 
Jones WAS HMJ, Ray Enders W3RLT, 
James P. Murray K3QAW, Allen 
Mcquate K3HQC, James R, Shank 
W5CNS, Russel E, Martin W3MFW, 
George S, Gadbois W3FEY and James 
W. Burton, 



I 



73 MAGAZINE 




^ageg 



News of the World 



73 MAGAZINE 



10M BEACONS 



Three 1 meter beacons have been 
established in Region 1 to assist in 
propagation studies and to establish 
reliable path/conditions information. 
They are bound to be invaluable aids 
to amateurs In the rest of the world 
for spotting band openings now that 
activity has lessened due to the de- 
clining sunspot cycle. 

Besides the three stations presently 
in operation below, others are planned 
in the near future for Cyprus, Antar- 
tica and North America* 

DL0IGI, Ml Predigtstuhl near Salz- 
burg (Austria) 28.195 MHz and 
28.200 MHz, between 15-20 and 
45—50 min, past each hour. 

GB3SX, Crowborough, Sussex (UK), 
28J85 MHz. 

3B8MS Signal Mount (Mauritius J, 
28.200 MHz, will QSY to 28.190 MHz 
shortly. 



COLLINS 
RETURNS 



Efectronic News^ 3/5/73 

Collins Radio owns 57 per cent of a 
manufacturing and marketing subsidi- 
ary formed in Japan. 

Collins Radio Co. of Japan Ltd,, 
was formed with Kyokuto Boeki 
Kaisha Ltd. (Far Eastern Mercantile 
Co.) of Japan. 

Initial p(ans call for production of 
communication products for maritime 
and amateur use. 

W.C. Hubbard, named vice- 
president and general manager of 
Collins Far East international opera- 
tions, wilt be based in Tokyo. Mr 
Hubbard was vice-president and con- 
troller of Collins. 

In Tokyo, a Kyokuto spokesman 
said products of the new Collins sub- 
sidiary will be sold on the domestic 
market and exported to the U.S, 




Hoiding an oversized copy of their new 
repeater license WR3AAA are FM A^ocia- 
lion officers Robert McClain W3VRZ, ciub 
president, Beaver Falls; Richard Hanna 
K3VYY, treasurer, Beaver Falls; Chester 
Calvin WA3LJS, secretary, Patletson 
Heights; and Kenneth Biggie W3FCQ, chief 
engineer, Patterson Township. The repeater 
is iocaied in Freedom PA on 146.25-85, 

(Photo by K3KGX) 



LAWMEN 
AIDED 

An Associated Press technician, the 
pifoi for a radio station traffic report, 
two deputy sheriffs, and lots of rein- 
forcements combined forces March 14 
to keep three prisoners in custody. 
Two Milwaukee county sheriffs depu- 
ties were transporting frtree prisoners 
from Waupun to Milwaukee for frial 
when the prisoners allegedly tried an 
escape. Sheriff Michael Wolke says the 
three - one from Central State Hospi- 
tal and two from the prison at 
Waupun, somehow got out of their 
handcuffs and chains and tried to 
overpower the two deputies when 
their car was near Menomonee Falls 
on U.S. 41. But Associated Press 
techniciah Jim Taylor K9ZYS was 
nearby in hfs car, and he reported the 
incident on two meters (146.671 to 
W9PAS who notified the Washington 
County authorities, who in turn alert- 
ed the Milwaukee County authorities. 
The pilot pinpointed the location of 
the trouble for reinforcements. Both 
deputies were slightly injured, but the 
three prisoners were quickly rounded 
up. 



DENVER 
LAWSUIT 



Chuck WA0DNH In Denver is in the 
midst of something even worse than a 
tower suit. White the usual legal 
hassles involve large towers equipped 
with multi-arrays, a lawsuit is being 
brought against Chuck because he 
recently erected a Hy-Gain 4 band 
vertical in his back yard. 

Chuck's lawyer is building a defense 
but is unfamiliar with cases of this 
sort. He is in need of a vast amount of 
information so he can effectively pro- 
tect Chuck and, in the long run, any 
other amateur in the area who may run 
into a similar problem. 

ANYONE who has had legal action 
taken against them and survived to 
transmit again can help. Chuck is 
desperate. You can contact him by 
writing: Chuck Kaufman, 3734 So. 
Poplar St., Denver CO 88237. 

We*d like to keep track of this case 
and be ready when another appears. 
Possibly keeping an open file of legal 
facts that will be kept accessible is the 
answer. To be effective well need 
facts however, so start digging. 



GUATEMALA 
ON 3RD PARTY 

LIST 

On April 5, 1973, Decree No. 19-73 
was passed by the Guatemalian Con- 
gress and was signed by President 
Osorio, making 3rd party traffic legal 
between Guatemala and the USA. 

The notice was published in the 
Diario de Centro America,, the Of- 
frcia! Gazette of Guatemala on April 
16, and the handling of traffic became 
legal 30 days after that date. 



FUJR BUJR ZKEZK EFULQ 



EFWQQ RQKW LTC WKEQL US 



EFYWEQQV EFYWER EPU! 



^ 



JUNE 1973 



^ 




GAO REVIEW OF THE FCC 

The General Accounting Office has 
fTiade an extensive investigation of the 
FCC's ability to enforce their regula- 
tions and found them seriously want- 
ing. This finding will come as no 
surprise to any amateur who has ever 
listened to the citizens band or to the 
marine channels. 

The GAO is most criticai of the 
FCC for not taking forceful action 
against willful violators, parttcularly 
the citizens banders. They point out 
that the FCC has made it a practice of 
reducing or cancelling fines, with the 
result that enforcement of the ruJes is 
virtually impossible. During 1971 
there were 502 citizens band opera- 
tors fined for violations. Of this num- 
ber isn handed in their licenses and 
paid no fines, 87 had their fines 
cancelled entirely, and the remainder 
had their fines reduced substantially. 
Only 30% of the fines were collected! 

When you consider that there are 
an estimated 800,000 CBers, of which 
approximateiy 799,999 are operating 
in violation of the reguiations - plos 
who knows how many right in there 
with them without the benefit of a 
license - the 502 cited seems insignifi- 
cant. 

The GAO suggests that the FCC 
might be more efficient if it got out of 
the business of giving license exams, 
inspecting shipboard radio installa- 
tions, and cut way down on inspec- 
tions of broadcast stations. They sug- 
gest turning over license exams to the 
Civil Service Commission, which is 
already in that business for other 
branches of the government. This 
might be better than having them 
given by the FCC, though I personally 
favor an investigation of means by 
which authorized amateur radio clubs 
might administer the exams — thereby 
saving the government the cost of 
giving the exams. Surely some means 
can be devised which will result in an 
honest system. 

The GAO makes a point that the 
lack of enforcement of the citizens 
band has set up a bad psychological 
situation which is resulting in a spread 
of the contempt for regulations which 
characterizes CB. Certainly we see 
signs of this in the ham bands* The 



threat of many repeater groups to 
react to the new repeater reguiations 
which they consider ridiculous by just 
ignoring them certainly would never 
be made if the example of chaos on 
CB were not there* 

Amateurs feel that they have a right 
to reasonable regulations - and to 
their being enforced. Right now we 
have neither. 



TVI BILL 

The next time you find a piece of 
paper in hand you could do a lot 
worse with it than drop a note to your 
congressman asking him to support 
HR3516, a bill entered by Representa- 
tive Teague of California which would 
make it illegal for manufacturers to 
put out radios and television sets 
which would get interference from 
amateur or CB rigs. How about thatl 
You should know who your congress- 
man is by now. 



SALES AGENTS FOR 73 

Just recently we've signed on some 
sales agents for 73 subscriptions and 
books. This has worked out very well 
for them — with incomes of $50 to 
$100 a weekend being reported. One 
agent made S80 just selling subscrip- 
tions at two auctions on one weekend. 

This is a golden opportunity to let 
your hobby start paying for itself and 
bring you some extra income. There 
are some good territories left, so if 
you have the time and means to get to 
every ham activity within reasonable 
driving distance and you have a good 
outgoing personality — you don't sell 
subscriptions by sitting at a table and 
waiting for people to find you, you 
have to make sure that everyone 
knows you are there and what you are 
there for— and you have to let them 
know what you've got and why they 
should subscribe right away. This 
means getting some time every now 
and then on the public address sys- 
tem — going around and keeping after 
everyone. 



U.S. AMATEUR 

FREQUENCY 

ALLOCATIONS 



EDITORIAL BY WAYNE GREEN Class 





QWOnfy 


Pfione & DW 


Extra 


3.500- 3,775 


3J75- 


- 4.000 


Class 


7.000- 7.150 


7.150- 


- 7.300 




14,000-14.200 


14.200- 


-14.350 




21.000-21.250 


21.250- 


-21.450 




28,000-28,500 


38,500- 


-29.700 




BO.000-50.100- 


50J00- 


^54.000 


Advanced 3.525- 3.775 


3.800- 


- 4.000 


Class 


7.025- 7.t50 


7J50- 


- 7.300 




14.025-14.200 


14.200- 


-14.350 




21,025-21.250 


21.270- 


-21-450 




28.000-28,500 


28,500- 


-29.700 




50.000-50, 1 00 


50.100- 


-54.000 


General 3.525- 3.775 


3.890- 


- 4.0O0 


Class 


7.025- 7.150 


7.225- 


- 7.300 




14.025-14.200 


T4.275- 


-14.350 




21.025-21,250 


21.350- 


-21.450 




28.000-28,600 


28.500- 


-29.700 






50,1 00- 


54,000 


Novioe 


3J00- 3 750 






Class 


7.100- 7 J 50 
21.100-21.200 
28,100-28,200 








SSTV Frequencies 








Suggested 


1 




3.775- 3.8g0 


3.345 






7 ISO- 7.225 


7.220 






14,200 14.275 


14.230 






21.250-21.350 


21.340 






28 500^29.700 


28.680 






50.100 54.000 








LICENSE FEES 





Initial License $ 9 

Renewal , $ 9 

New Class , $ 9 

Modification S 4 

sped Of Ib^^JI OJOn ><> mmt^^M^mr** E^^O 

Use FCC Form 610 and mail with 
appropriate fee to: 

Federal Comma nicst ions Commission 
Gettysburg PA 17325 



LYNCH YOUR SECRETARY 

If your club secretary does not 
send for the special secret club 73 
subscription offer and let you know 
about this incredible trial offer deal, 
then serious consideration should be 
given at the next club meeting to 
forming a lynch mob and getting 
someone a little more diligent for the 
job. Pacing up this amazing opportu- 
nity might be considered by some as 
an offense to therrttelves, to the club, 
to the community, to the country and 
perhaps to all mankind. 

Why take a chance? 

Drop a letter to Ace Goodwin 
W1GR0 and demand that he send you 
the special confidential secret club 

(continued on page J 04) 



73 MAGAZINE 




MAXIMIZE 

YOUR AMMUR RADIO 



What new 2M FM gives 
me most for my money, 
performance vs. price? The 
answer's as clear as the superb 
reception you'll get on the new 
Standard 826MA. 10 watt, 2 
meter FIVI transceiver. You'll 
find such outstanding features 
as 12 channels — with the four 
most popular ones included — 
and a RF output meter with 
selection of 10 watts or 0.8 watt 
for battery conservation. And of 
course, our "Astropoint" system 



money: 



that assures: top selec- 
tivity, great sensitivity, 
and rejection of unwanted sig- 
nals on today's active 2M band. 
Helical Resonators & FET front 
end provide the performance 
needed for tomorrows crowded 
channels. Provision for tone 
coded squelch to activate mod- 
ern repeaters. A radio that won't 
become obsolete. Occupies less 
than 200 cu, in. Weighs less than 
5 lbs. It has all the same "Astro- 
points" as entire Amateur line. 




NEW 22 CHANNEL BASE STATION 
SRC-14U 

Ultimate in a 2M FM Transceiver features 

D 22 channels 

D AC & DC supplies Built In 

n lOW (1 . 3 & 10 selectable) 

D Receiver offset tuning 

n VOX 

n Three Front Panel Meters 

D Plus many more exciting features. 

For detailed information on these; the complete Standard line and the name of your nearest dealer write: 




Standard 



Communications Corp. 

213/775-6284 ■ 639 North Marine Avenue, Wilmington, California 90744 



JUNE 1973 




Dave Ingram K4TWJ 

Rte. t r. Box 499^ Eastwood Vif. 

Birmingham AL 352 W 



SON 



Some confusion over identification 

and mformation exchange was noted 
during the Slow Scan contest this 
year. Initially the plan was to ex^ 
change all information on SSTV; how- 
ever. Franco did make an exception 
for those countries requiring SSB 
identification of SSTV transmissions. 
In fact, the actual Slow Scan exchange 
was narrowed down to merely ex- 
changing an ID frame with the QSO 
number for each contact. You could 
identify on SSB before, during, or 
after Slow Scan transmissions if de- 
sired (this will probably be the situ a- 
tion next year also). Some problems 
still arose by stations using only SSB 
and no Slow Scan. It is my under- 
standing these QSOs were rejected. 
Remember, this is not a hair, teeth 
and eyeball DX massacre, but rather a 
worldwide promotion of the SSTV 
mode. Yet, like any contact, it must 
have rules which must be followed* I 
hope to have the complete contest 
results next month, either in this 
column, or the preceding newspages. 
We have a guest column this month 
written by Professor Franco Fanti, 
I1LCF, on Slow Scan activity in 
Europe. 1 have translated his info, 
thus it may not reflect an Italian 
accent. Franco was one of the original 
Slow Scan pioneers in Europe. While 
SM0BUO made the first European/ 
American QSO, Franco made the first 
European/New Zealand QSO. 
"There is a relatively large amount of home- 
brew Slow Scan gear in Europe, mostly of 
the classic MacDonald and K7YZZ design. 
However, the second and third Slow Scan 
contest results confirmed the large amount 
of new commercially built gear now appear- 
ing in Europe. Indeed, Slow Scan appears to 
be catdhiTtg on heavily in Italy. A largt 
market lof SSTV gear H developing on 
Italy's 27 MHz "business band." In Italy, 
this band comes under the Postal Depart- 
ment ^nd was first estabUshed for their 
many fishing ships to use, etc. Also (as in the 
U.S.1 many illegal CB-type operators use this 
band. Now both the legal (businesses) and 
illegal (hobbyists J are starting to set up Slow 
Scan gear on this band of frequencies. The 
utilization of SSTV by large businesses is a 
trend that may expand into other European 
countries." 

! guess you have heard that JA's 
can now legally operate SSTV. Judg- 
ing from the number that had been 
watching pix on 20 meters, there 
should be quite a group on very soon. 
The VK boys say the first ones on had 
very good pix. No info yet on their 



gear, but I suspect their nnanufacturers 
will be quick to recognize the tremen- 
dous market 

Incidentally, I understand sonw 
overseas Slow Scanners (and others) 
are having a real problem securing 
parts. They send money and orders to 
stateside companies and that is the 
last of it. No reply, no parts, etc, I've 
helped a couple of the fellows by 
acting as an intermediary — they sent 
me their money, I bought the parts 
and sent them to the fellows. If other 
SSTVers help a DX friend like this, we 
will soon get even more countries on 
Slow Scan. Why not ask them about 
this during your next QSO. Further, I 
would like to hear what companies the 
DX ops are having problems with. 
Then we can pressure them . . , or the 
involved mail services. 



TO QKH II4SE 



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'Sib 




WCRTtCAt 
C€«ITEIi 



•4fiOEii iwiirs 



Fig. J. f^odiftcadon for the popular 'MXV 
monitor which enables a stRji-step analysis 
of the wceived video signal to bt displBy&d 
on the screen. 

Here's another modification for 
'MXV type monitors which should 
prove interesting. Our thanks to Ed 
Walker VE4CG, for the initial circuit. 
(You didn't miss the other modrfica- 
tion which was in the February issue, 
did you?) Here the addition of two 
pots and a DPDT switch converts the 
screen display to a stair-step spectrum 
analysis of the "received video signal 
(so called because of the various amp- 
litude displayed for each frequency, 
or gray shade). The connections 
originally made to pin 4 and 5 of 
ICnO, the vertical deflection op-amp, 
are broken and run through each side 
of a DPDT switch, leaving tne "down' ' 
position free. The ''down" positions 
now connect to the wipers on the two 
pots {see Fig.lK The 1 Meg pot 
adjust the size of the video discrimi- 
nator pattern, and the 10K pot is for 
proper centering of this display on the 
screen (this may drift slightly, so place 
it in a convenient location K The moni- 
tor now gives either a Slow Scan 
picture or video anaylsis, depending 
on the position of SW1. This same 
principle may be applied to practically 
any monitor. All that is necessary is to 
sample the video voltage just before 
it's applied to the crt (1 Meg potj and 
run this small voltage to the vertical 
amplifier/sweep stage. The second pot 
(10K poti is used rather than re- 
centering with exiiting controls. 

K4TWJ 



AMSAT 




NEWS 



Michaet Frye WB8LBP 
640 Deauvilfe Dr 
Dayton OH 45429 



Good news for OSCAR 6 users — 
the satellite will now be on for an 
additional two days per week. The 
satellite operating schedule is as fol- 
lows: 

Satellite 2/1 OM translator ON 
OOOOZ Thurs.-2400Z Mon. 

Satellite 2/1 OM translator OFF 
OOOOZ Tues."2400Z Wed 

It should be noted at this point that 
it is very important that you do not 
try to use the satellite during the off 
times. If you do hear the satellite it 
will be the command stations either 
running experiments or recording the 
telemetry. Telemetry is very im- 
portant in the operation of the sate)- 
lite and it is impcssible for ground 
command stations to receive it if the 
translator is jammed with calls. If you 
hear someone using the satellite please 
do not try to contact them. They may 
be part of an experiment or a test. 
Instead, log ^eir calls and the time 
and send it to AMSAT, Also, if the 
satellite is not allowed to recharge, the 
batteries will become weak and even- 
tually one will reverse, destroying the 
satellite for everyone. This problem of 
weak batteries is caused by the small 
dimensions of the satellite and limited 
area of solar cells. To make matters 
worse, one of the cells is malfunction- 
ing and gives only intermittent power 
Please observe these times. 

From information received from 
AMSAT I find that only 42 of the 50 
United States have amateurs com- 
municating through OSCAR 6. Sta- 
tions are badly needed in the follow^ 
ing states: 

Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Nebraska 
New Mexico 
South Dakota 
Vermont 
Wyoming 
Why not try to gear up these states? 
Possibly a group could form "DXpedi- 
tions" during weekends. Field Day 
(June 23-24) would be more than an 
ideal time to try. I have heard some 
speculation on the possibility that 
Vermont does not exist! Well, I don't 
know about that, but if it does I feel 
that whoever turns that state on had 
better be ready for one heck of a 



6 



73 MAGAZINE 



time. [ know quite a few amateurs 
whc need Vermont to complete a 
WAS. 

AMSAT has asked us to continue 
sending signal reports m they really 
help in determining what OSCAR is 
doing. In addition, for those amateurs 
who copy telemetry, anyone observ- 
ing an extra dot or dash on the end of 
transmissions from the satellite will 
you please send this infomiation to 
AMSAT (time, date, etc.* includedO? 
This coufd indicate some form of 
degradation in one of the channels of 
the translator. This could be caused 
by the abnormally high temperature 
that has been observed recently and 
further studies would like to be made 
on this possibility, 

I will continue to publish a list of 
one reference orbit per day for the 
month. To find orbital info for other 
than orbits shown, simply keep adding 
Its minutes and 28.75 degrees for 
each succeeding orbit. 




FCC NEWS 



Orbit 


Data 


Time 1 


.ongitude of Eq 




(June) 


(GiVITI Crossing °W 


2860 


1 


01 54.0 


75.9 


2872 


2 


00S3.9 


60.9 


2885 


3 


0148.8 


74.6 


2897 


4 


0048.8 


59,6 


2910 


5 


0143.7 


73.4 


2922 


6 


0043.6 


58.3 


2935 


7 


0138.6 


72.1 


2947 


8 


0038.5 


57.1 


2060 


9 


0133.4 


70.8 


1972 


10 


0033.4 


55.8 


2985 


11 


0128.3 


69.5 


2997 


12 


0028.2 


54.5 


3010 


13 


0123.1 


68.2 


3022 


14 


0023.1 


53.2 


3035 


15 


0118.0 


56.9 


3047 


16 


0017.9 


51.9 


3060 


17 


0112.9 


65.6 


3072 


18 


0012.8 


50.6 


3085 


19 


0107.7 


64,4 


3097 


20 


0007.7 


49.3 


3110 


21 


0102.6 


63.1 


3122 


22 


0002,5 


48.1 


3135 


23 


0057,4 


61.8 


3148 


24 


0152.4 


75.5 


3160 


25 


0052.3 


60.5 


3173 


26 


0147.2 


74.2 


3185 


27 


0047.2 


59.2 


3108 


28 


0142.1 


73.0 


3210 


29 


0042.0 


57.9 


3223 


30 


0137.0 


71.7 



It is with deep regret that I must 
announce the death of Clinton A. 
Petry W3AWN, who died of a heart 
attack at the age of 67, while on tour 
in Hong Kong, March 25, 1973, 
"Cap" has been very active in AMSAT 
and OSCAR promotion. He was 
scheduled to be moderator of the 
SpaceComm forum at the Dayton 
Hamwention. I am sure his loss will be 

felt by alL 

WB8LBP 



If you should need to report sus- 
picious or improper radio activity, 
anomalous signals, or interference, 
contact the monitoring station nearest 
you, rather than the FCC in Washing- 
ton, Address your report or complaint 
to ''Engineer in Charge, Federal Com- 
munications Commission, (name of 
city) Monitoring Station, "at the vari- 
ous addresses given below, listed 
alphabetically by city or town. The 
telephone number for each monitor 
ing station is also listed. 

P.O. Box 89 
Allegan Ml 40901 
(616-673-2063) 

P.O* Box 1 1 26 
DeiTi$on TX 75020 

(Ambrose Monitoring Station) 
(214-965-7729) 

P.O. Box 6303 Annex 
Anchorage AK 99502 
(344-1011) 

P.O* Box 470 
Belfast ME 04916 
{207-338^088) 

P.O. Box 374 
CanandaJgua NY 14424 
(315-3944240) 

P.O. Box 251 
Chtllccothe OH 45601 
(614-775-6523) 
P.O. Box 6 
Douglas AZ 85607 
(602^364-2133) 

9900 West State Road 84 

P.O. Box 22836 

Fort Lauderdale FL 33315 

(305-583-2511) 

P.O. Box 1588 

Grand Island NE 63801 

(308-3824296) 

P.O. Box 1087 

Imperial Beach CA 92032 
{7144350048) 

P.O. Box 632 
Kingsville TX 78363 
(512 592 2531) 

P.O. Box 40 

LauretMD 20810 

(301-725-3474) 

P.O. 6ox 311 
Uvermore CA 94550 
(415447-3614) 

3222 McLeod Road 
P,0. Box 330 
BelltnghamWA 98225 
(Marietta Monitormg StationJ 
(206-7344196) 



3600 Hiram- Ltthia Spring Road, S*W. 
P,0. Box 85 

Powder Springs GA 30073 
(404-943-5420) 

P.O. Box 1 81 

Sabana Seca Puerto Rico 00749 

(309-784-3772) 

P.O. Box 5126 
Santa Ana CA 92704 
(714-545-1333) 
P.O. Box 191 
Spokane WA 99210 
(509^244-2141) 

P.O. Box 1035 

Waipahu HI 96797 
(808-677-3954) 

F(X ACTION IN RACES 
DOCKET CASE 

in Report No. 849S, dated April 
20, 1973^ the Commission has ordered 
an inquiry into the feasibility of ex- 
panded operation of the Radio Ama- 
teur Civil Emergency Service 
(RACES), which provides for amateur 
radio operation during civil emergen- 
cies. 

A request by the New York State 
Civil Defense Commission (NYCD), to 
expand emission privileges for ama- 
teur stations in the RACES program 
v^as denied. 

RACES is a radiocommunication 
service conducted by licensed amateur 
radia stations for civil defense pur- 
poses only. The amateurs operate on 
specifically designated segments of the 
regularly allocated amateur frequency 
tiiands, under the direction of author- 
ized local, regional or Federal civil 
defense officials, according to an ap- 
proved civil defend communications 
plan. Amateur licensees and certain 
grades of commercial radio operator 
licensees are eligible to operate 
RACES stations, providing they are 
enrolled as radio operators in thecivi] 
defense organization. 

RACES stations share the allocated 
frequencies with other amateur sta- 
tions. Since the privileges of amateur 
radio operators classes (Section 97.7) 
do not generally apply to the opera- 
tion of RACES stations, and non- 
amateurs may operate RACES sta- 
tions, the Commission stated, safe- 
guards are necessary to insure that 
non-essential RACES radiocom- 
munication is not conducted at the 
expense of regular amateur radiocom- 
municatlons. 

The Commission explained that it 
was ordering the inquiry because it 
had received no positive response to a 
rulemaking proposal, adopted March 
22, 1967 (Docket 17315), In response 
to a NYCD petition, and it lacked 
"any other substantive information" 
on the need to expand RACES. 

Four additional petitions for ex pan* 
slon of RACES were filed later with 
the FCa 



JUNE 1973 



The Commission invited comments 
on specific questions as to whether 
RACES is an effective means of pro- 
viding needed communications during 
local, regional or national emergen- 
cies; if the present licensing system for 
RACES stations is appropriate; if 
RACES stations should be assigned 
distinctive call signs that could be 
used only for RACES activities. It also 
asked for discussion on rule abuses by 
RACES stations to determine whether 
they are "commonplace," and what 
possible solutions exist to end them; if 
additional frequencies, emissions, or 
operators should be authorized for 
RACES stations; the most needed 
additional privileges; the consequences 
to both RACES and the Amateur 
Radio &rvice generally, if RACES 
privileges are expended; the conse- 
quences if the privileges are not ex- 
panded; and additional safeguardSj if 
any, which might be required to in- 
sure that non-essential RACES radio- 
communication is not conducted to 
the detriment of non- RACES amateur 
radincommu nlcatton* 

Comments are requested on or be- 
fore July 1 , 1 973. 

The Mew York State Civil Defense 
Commission petition, denied by the 
FCC, asked for expansion of RACES 
to permit the use of facsimile, F4 
emission, in the 1800-2000 kHz and 
3500—4000 kHz amateur frequency 
bands. The plan called for a RACES 
radio link to serve as a back-up capa- 
bility to the primary wireline link in a 
system for facilitsting the collection, 
interpolation and dissemination of 
radiological fallout data from moni- 
toring stations throughout the state. 

The Commission noted that no one 
filed comments supporting the New 
York request. The American Radio 
Relay League (ARRL) and the New 
York State Phone Traffic and Emer- 
gency Net opposed it, The New York 
Telephone Company disputed the 
New York State Civil Defense Com- 
mission's contention that New York 
State's "post-attack wireline survival 
capability is an unknown," and a 
radio back-up link was necessary- 

The four petitions for expansion of 
RACES still before the Commission 
include a request by San Diego 
County, Calif,, to operate RACES 
stations by radio remote control 
through a control link using non- 
amateur frequencies; a request by the 
California Disaster Office for exten- 
sive rule changes, including expansion 
and revision of frequency allocation 
for RACES; a request by the Area 
"D" Civil Defense and Disaster Board; 
Pomona, Calif,, for authorization of 
40F2 emission for radioteleprinter 
operation in the frequency bands 
145,17-145.71 MHz, 146.79-147.33 
MHz and 220-225 MHz; and a re^ 



quest by a licensee to permit Tech- 
nician Class licensees to operate in the 
503.5-53,75 MHz, 145J 7- 145.71 
MHz and 220-225 MHz frequency 
bands in RACES, and to authorize the 
frequencies 146-147 MHz for 
RACES with emissions of 0,1 A 1, 
MF1,6A2, 6A4 3nd40F3. 

Action by the Commission April 
18, 1973, by Notice of Inquiry and 
Report and Order, Commissioners 
Burch (Chairman), Johnson, Reid, 
Wiley and Hooks, 




The Hamburglor 

STRIKES AGAIN i 



LIrt from Past Issues: 






Mfr, Modal, S^r. No. 


Owner 


Issue 


Coll. 8281 No. 10728 


MSU ARC 


6/72 


WRL Duo Bndf 60TOAT302 


WA6FCV 


6/72 


HR.2A. n Chan., 04-07 IS2 


WA1NVC 


srrz 


Colltni mc, Mod.MMs, 


K4ACJ 


9/72 


IMo,4294 






Heath HW 100 a AC PS 


WAejGP 


10^2 


SwBfl 270B. Mo. M'39B430 


WBHST 


11/72 


A F 68 Mo. 10888 


K5LKL 


1/73 


PMHB No 1&918 






Ml 070 pwr supply 






Trio rR2Z00 No. 24^969 


WA2ZBV 


1/73 


Ckm 2a«f Mo. 1900^578 


mOHP 


2/73 


Standard 82€M,No. 112007 


WA8PCG 


3/73 


FM27E No. 27013^1 141 


W2LHI 


4/73 


FM-144-10L No. F4SS 


WAeWOA 


4m 


NPC 107rn pw supply 






2, 5Af IPL Onan G«n,, 






No. 327885 







The Muskegon Area Amateur Radio 
Council reports the theft of the fol- 
lowing pieces of equipment from their 
club station sometime during the 
week of March 12th: Electro- Voice 
641 mic on Astatic GN series stand, 
R.L. Drake R4B recerver SN t1578G, 
R,L, Drake T4XB transmitter SN 
17801G, R.L Drake W4 wattmeter 
SN 8390, Swan 250 six meter trans- 
ceiver SM F 154806, and a Swan ac 
power supply SN 0653556, Any infor- 
mation regarding this equipment may 
be sent to the MAARC, P.O. Box 691, 
Muskegon Ml 49443 or WA8GVK, 
Area code 616 - 722 3910 or 
744-1400. 

Stolen from W6 GSR's auto on 
March 10, 1973 in Berkeley CA" 
Regency HR-2 Ser, No. 04- C 2879 and 
SB-34 Ser. Na 211828, Ple^ notify 
Frank Inami W6GSR, 1168 Hillcrest 



Court, Livermore CA 94550 or the 
Berkeley Police Department. 

Afso stolen was a Standard 826, 
Ser. No, 011268 with an 806 front 
panel and a Dycomm 500D amplifier 
from the locked car {it was parked in 
the driveway [) of Martin Siegel 
WA2FSD, 22 Burbury Lane, Great- 
neck NY 11023. 

A Motorola HT220, Ser. No. 
G J 7327 was bethefted from the 
SUNYA Campus, Albany, N.Y, Re- 
plies should be made to the State 
University of N.Y, at Albany, 
Washington Ave,, Albany NY, c/o IVIr 
Williams, SUNYA P.D, 






Bin Turner WA0ABi 
Five Chestnut Court 
St Peters MO 6337B 

WA9FEF writes from Chicagoland 
that March was rather quiet until the 
19th when he worked WA1 EXN on E. 
Later the same day a very good aurora 
set in, providing contacts with 
WA2DPJ, WA1RFA, W3BWU, 
WB8NGD and others. The aurora last- 
ed six to seven hours- The following 
day the band again prodcued aurora, 
this time for only a short time, but 
long enough to work Jim WB4YAB of 
NE Kentucky. Also mentioned was an 
E opening the 22nd during which 
WA2DPJ was again heard. Dave men- 
tions too that K0AGJ (also Dave) puts 
e strong CW signal into the Chicago 
area and is interested in starting a CW 
net on 6 meters. Anyone interested 
may contact him at 3322 W. 17th St, 
Davenport, Iowa, 1 might add that 
Dave is often heard in the St. Louis 
area calling CQ on CW but seldom is 
there evidence of anyone answering. 

Elmer K0OCN writes that he has 
returned to 6 meters after several 
years of inactivity only to find an 
almo^ complete lack of contacts on 
AM. The conversion to SSB is nearly 
as complete as it is on the lower 
frequencies. For some years now, and 
with very few exceptions, all new 
equipment has been basically SSB 
with provision in some cases to insert 
carrier for pseudo AM operation. 
While there is still some AM operation 
around, the amount is rather small 
compared to what it was even five 
years ago. 1 have been calling CQ on 
AM for over two weeks trying to get a 
signal report . . . not one signal has 
been heard. 

WA7FLB, "Doc," of Mayer, Ari- 
zona, has recently experienced a little 
troubie with his five-year-old linear. 



8 



73 MAGAZINE 



but the problem turned out to be just 
a bad power switch contact , . . the 
linear is back on the air and working 
as wetl as ever Doc says he has heard 
lots of "burbles" of fate but not well 
enough to identify them. 

Bob WA5RBI, says Enid, Oklahoma 
had openings February 
3^4-5-8-9'iai2- and 22 covering 
Maryland to California and Louisiana 
to Utah. Of the April 1st aurora, Bob 
says, '1 called CQ's both sideband and 
CW but the only one I got a rise out 
of was a South Dakota station . , , 
sure wish I knew who he was , , . I 
don't think the many signals I heard 
even realized that the band was 
open ... 1 heard many Vs yakking 
back and forth but not doing any 

listening " Bob also mentions hav- 

tng worked Arizona (WA7BXK) three 
nights in a row with 5/9 signals. 

Mike WA2DWZ would like to con- 
vert a Lafayette HA-460 to FM but 
can't find a commercial unit with 
enough deviation at 50 MHz. 1 have 
sent along some suggestions, but 1 am 
sure Mike would appreciate hearing 
from someone who has successfully 
completed such a modification. You 
may write Mike at 1381 Linden Blvd., 
Apt. 7F, Brooklyn, N,Y. 11212. 

Preliminary reports from the Itchy- 
coo Park VHP ARC "Worldwide VHP 
Activity" show a 50 to 100% increase 
in activity over last year. Band condi- 
tions in the East provided very good 
ground wave and a number of stations 
were able to take advantage of the 
situation. WA1RFA (MassJ worked 
several Pennsylvania stations, includ- 
ing K3YWY and WA3EBX; K1ZKR 
worked 123 stations in 8 states; 
WA3NLH worked 9 states with a total 
of 145 contacts. Congratulations are 
again due this group for their effort to 
increase VHP band occupancy. 

The April 1st aurora previously 
mentioned was one of the best I have 
ever heard. I can recall only one 
previous opening which could be conn- 
pared to this one. The first indication 
here was around 2000Z, the initiaf 
period lasted somewhat over SVj 
hours, followed by an hour or so lull, 
then opened again until after the plug 
was pulled at 0400Z. Signals from 
unusually far south were heard, with 
Atlanta marking the southern edge as 
received here. 

April 8th brought a strong but 
localized opening to Charleston, S,C. I 
worked the entire 6 meter SSB popu- 
lation of the area consisting of 
WA3BSZ/4, W4USW, WB4TTY and 
WB4MJY. No other stations were 
heard from this end. Several of the 
above worked W0CCD, Omaha, This 
was apparently the only other station 
active on the western end of this 
particular opening, 

WA0ABI 



73 s WORLDWIDE 
SALES REPRESENTATIVES 



U,S AREA REPRESENTATIVES 

IMew Mexico/West Texas 

Ambrose G. Barry, W4GHV/5 
1010 Juniper Avenue 
Alamogordo, New Mexico 88310 

Midwestern States 

Gloria M. Ligon, K8WKE 
47160 Condor Street 
Utica, Michigan 48087 

DX REPRESENTATIVES 

BCN Agencies Pty. Ltd. 
178 Collins Street 

Melbourne 3000, Victoria 
Australia 

The Wireless Institute of Australia 

478 Victoria Parade 

P.O. Box 36 

East Melbourne, Victoria 

Australia 

Carlos Rohden 
Caixa Posal 5004 
Sao Paulo, S,P, 
Brasil 

Jim Coote 

56, Dinsdale Avenue 

Kings Estate 

Waflsend 

Northumberland, England 

Radio Society of Great Britain 

35 Doughty Street 

London WCIN 2AE, England 

Short Wave Magazine 
55 Victoria Street 
London, SW1, England 

Bryan Fogerty 

Irish Radio Transmitters Society 

9 Wellington Street, 

Dun Laioghaire, Eire 

Wireless Sen/ices, P.U,Sukhadia, 
1/16, Shantmath Bhuvan, 
427, Sion Road 
Matunga, C. Rly., 
Bombay 19, India 

Orion Books 

13-19 Akasaka 2-chome 

Minato-ku 

Tokyo 107, Japan 



Tama Electronics Co,, Ltd. 
Towa Building 502 
515 Higashi Oizumi, Nerima-Ku, 
Tokyo 177, Japan 

Sun Electron Corporation 
15—20 Takaban-1-chome 
Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152, Japan 

Kushal Harvant Singh 

83, Aulong Road off Stephens Road 

Kampong Boyan 

Taiping, Perak, Malaysia 

Gordon and Gotch Ltd. 
P.O. Box 584 
Auckland, New Zealand 

G. H. Gillman 

Smarts Road 

Waikuku RMO 

Rangiora, North Canterbury 

New Zealand 

New Zealand Assn. of Radio 

Transmi tters 
P.0, Box 1459 

104 Hereford Street 
Christchurch, New Zealand 

Harold C. Leon 
P,0, Box 61141 

Marshafltown, Transvaal 
South Africa 

South African Radio Publications 
P.O, Box 2232 
Johannesburg, South Africa 

South African Radio Relay League 

P.0, Box 391 1 

Cape Town, South Africa 

Julio Antonio Prieto Alonso, EA4CJ 

Donoso Cortes No. 58 

Piso 50, Letra B 

Madrid 15, Espana (Spain) 

All Europe, 

except Great Britain & 1 re land - 

Eskil Persson, SM5CJP 

Frotunagrand 1 

194 00 Uppiands Vasby 

Sweden 



HAM HELP 

If you need help getting your license, send 73 your name, address and 
phone number. Don't be bashful - remember, it's always easier when you 
have someone to give you that added bit of confidence. 

73 would appreciate amateurs Bnd clubs looking this list over and helping 

whoever they can, 

Gary L. Weseman Mike Noar Donald A. Cook Richard Groat 

4170 52nd St, Apt #12 9940 Belfair St RR. 1 Rt #1 

San Oiega C A 92105 Bellflower CA 9Q706 Centerville IN 47330 WashingtoirVVV 26187 



JUNE 1973 



mm 




mum ATLAS BEGISTBAim 



I 



REPEATER CALL (WR only) 



FORMER CALL 



LOCATiON (City) 



STATE 



INPUTS ; 


OUTPUTS 


TT Wh 
TB PL 


FM AM 
HTTY 


AUTO 
PATCH 


ERP 






H^ 












H? 












H^ 








1 




Hz 












Hz 




1 





USEFUL RANGE (RADIUS) 



EOUfPMENT 



D SPLIT SITE 

ANTENNAS & HEIGHT Doiplexer 



REPEATER GROUP/SPONSOR 



Ol ttrtify inmi i tiave recaived 
pleiinn this form. 



DATE 



TRUSTEE 



SOURCE (NAME/CALL) 



JD-TYPEOR MFR 



SPECIAL OR EMERGENCY FUNCTIONS 





(f REPEATER UPDATE 

( LISTENING 

V 94 76 88 7 3 70 64 82. 




■Ml 




AZ 


W7DAY 


Pht>enij( 


52.576- 


-52.525 


CA 


WflGAAA 


Cataliita Island 


147J9- 


-147.09 




ixWASZZE 






CT 


W1E0B 


GlasiDnbury 


147.S9 


-147.M 


GA 




Athens 




13-73 


lAl 


WR9AAC 
ex W9JSD 


Fl Wayne 




34^94 


IN 


WAflEAU 






16" 76 


MA 


KfUZR 


Bellingham 


146.fl6^ 


-147.0B 


MA 


WA1HDS 


Aflflwam 


146.40^ 


-147,00 


MA 


WA1U1Z 


Bofion 




01-61 


Ml 


wiacsQ 


SackitiJi 




23-6B 


Ml 


WSIIE 


Grand Rapids 
T2250 Of 


PilQO 


16-7i 


liH 


KIVWJ 


Landonderry 


147.66^ 


-147.06 


OH 


WBgNON 


Cincinnati 




115-70 


OH 


KBSCH 


Cincinnati 




07-67 


OK 


KSCFM 


Okiahams City 




22-82 




OelGie K5CEM 






PA 


WR3AAA 


Ffpedom 




26-85 


Rl 


WA10MS 


Prq vide nee 




28-S8 


SD 


WAiVWH 


Ri|iiif City 




34-14 


TN 


K4LSP 


Kin^^porr 




16-76 


TX 


W5AW 


Big Spring 




22-82 



REPEATER DXing 

Several repeater groups have asked 
that some sort of confidential record 
of telephone call up numbers be kept 
Every now and then someone is able 
to get hold of a Wats line - or has a 



friend on a test board — or something 

which makes long distance tines avail- 
able for a reasonable or less cost - 
and the thought comes to mind - 
how about connecting our repeater to 
another one somewhere? 

One local group has been working 
toward making such contacts in all 
states. The limiting factor is getting 
the telephone numbers of different 
repeaters so they can call in over the 
autopatch systems. 

If your repeater has a call up 
feature and your group wouW be 
interested rn getting calls from other 
repeater groups please send the call up 
number to 73 Magazine. We'll keep it 
reasonably confidential — that is we 
won't publish it in 73— and who 
knows, you might have some extra fun- 



UPDATES 
NEEDED 



I f you know of a new repeater or of 
an established machine that has re- 
ceived its WR cafi, mail in the above 
form completed with as much infor- 
mation as possible. We would prefer 

having duplicate - triplicate — even 

megaplicate information rather than 
none at alt. 



lOUCHTONE 




HERE COMES THE BRIDE 

13 3 3 

Here comes the bride 
1 9 G 6 
All dressed in white 

TWINKLE, TWINKLE, 
LITTLE STAR 

119 9 

Twinkle, Twinkle, 
9 
Little Star 



OLD MACDONALD HAD A FARM 

6 6 6 7 B 8 7 

Old Mac-Donald had a farm 
9 9 4 
EE-II-EE-IIOHHI 

4 G 6 6 7 8 
And on this farm he had 

8 7 
some chicks 
9 9 4 
EE-I-EE-I-OHH! 

4 4 4 4 4 

With a chick chick here 

4 4 4 4 4 

And a chick chick there 

4 4 4 4 4 4 

Here a chick there a chick 

4 4 4 4 4 4 

Ev-ry-where a chick chick 



10 



73 MAGAZINE 



REPEATER OWNERS 



Don't Take Chances. SENTRY 
to your specifications. When it co 
BEST -SENTRY. 



offers custom made crystals made exactly 
to crystals for your repeater, BUY THE 



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need SENTRY CRYSTALS. SENTRY CRYSTALS are custom made for your 
rig. We don't stock a large quantity of crystals for a certain frequency and 
hope you can tweak them to frequency in your rig. We do offer FAST service 
on crystals made especially for you and your rig. If you want reliable, 
on-frequency operation, INSIST ON SENTRY, 




[ 



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NOTE: Although at first glance this construction project may seem to be simple 
enough for even the most inept CB'er, it is recommended that only CB'ers 
that have achieved a rating of "Yogi Bear," or above, attempt to build a 
rig of this complexity. 



1 



12 



73 MAGAZINE 




BY, Gus Browning, W4BPD 

Setting here each month, thinking 
of various items to write about DX 
and looking over a heck of a lot of 
notes etc. you come to the conclu- 
Sfon that it is impossible to tell you 
all about everything, this means I 
am sure to leave out something that 
quite a few of you woufd have 
liked to know or read about, but I 
have just a certain amount of space 
for these "footnotes". I try to do 
what I can in the space available. 
It would be interesting to do a 
real "tracking-down*' job on just how 
certain "rumors" or at times just 
plain "lies" get started, its easy to see 
how they get circulated after the first 
bidbber-mouth gets the story. What I 
woufd like to track down to the 
originator, is the rumor that Jack— 
W2CTN was dead ! I got the info my- 
self from a short letter from K4AEB, 
Tava who lives over in Huntsville, 
Alabama. Then I went ahead and 
published it in my littie magazine* 
When the magazine was delivered a 
few days later the telephone began to 
ring, each caller telling me that this 
was not true. W2GHK, Stu Meyer 
even phoned Jacks home and was 
told that this was not true. Of course 
I retracted the story, mentioning that 
I got the info from K4EAB, Tava then 
phoned me telling me that he got the 
info in the form of a "bulletin" thats 
published and delivered from the West 
Coast — Now it would be interesting 
to find out WHO TOLD THEM ! 
Just what was accomplished by any- 
one circulating such a rumor is be- 
yond me to grasp. I know there are 
"sick people" in the world and it sure 
would be fine if they stayed out of 
bam radio, wouldn't It ? 

I have found out from a number of 
letters that NO ONE likes to be 
referred to as a "garden variety" 
DX'er ! I mentioned, something in a 
previous article about a "garden 
vai^iety" DX'er. I suppose my choice 
of words was wrong or something, 
I suppose they should be referred to 
as, "casual DX'ers" or something like 
that. I wonder what "word " is best 
to describe a "non-serious'' DX'er ? 
I see that now the VE6 group of 
fellows who have plans to put on a lot 
of the ''most needed" countries of the 
world have delayed their trip some- 
what because they are now building a 
boat of their own to use for some of 
their island hopping, I suppose. I can 
tell you this Js definitely the cheapest 



way to * go , but 1 warn them» look 
out for that one (or maybe more) 
land-lubber that may be in the crew. 
they can cause you a lot of trouble 
when those seas get a little rough and 
they be^Jn to get "pink around the 
gills" ! And, another item of import- 
ance is those fellows sure had better 
be "compatable" since its rough going 
when 5 or 6 fellows are together 24 
hours each day, crammed up in a small 
boat. I know all about this because 
I have been in the same situation a 
number of times and each time I will 
say to myself, ''never again" i So 
I am just warning you fellows, be very 
careful of the "crew'' you take along ! 
If you are a little suspicious now, it 
will get worse as the trip progresses. 
Remember fellows, its wintertime 
on the other side of the equator, the 
summertime QRM is nil down there* 
Since some fellows don't like to do 
battle from "down under" this may 
be the only time of the year that you 
can work certain of them. Of course 
it may be a little hard on your ears ! 
(especially if you are on 80 or 160 
meters), but it will be worth it if you 
can snag a good one from down there. 
All you fellows who have sent in 
your WTW applications please be a 
little patient with me because the 
printer (NOT MEJ was slow in deliver- 
ing the stickers to me. We issue the 
basic certificate for the first 100 
countries and then when you qualify 
for more countries later on and send 
us the info we will issue you a sticker 
to put on your WTW certificate. When 
we first started the WTW we had 
a different certificate printed for 
each band and mode, this involved a 
lot of printing and printers bills, so 
to sort of streamline and cut costs we 
now use the same basic certificate. 
We have had a delay in delivery of 
the 73*73-73 certificates also and I 
hope by the time you are reading this 
you will have yours in your hand. 
In case you haven't heard about the 
73-73-73 Certificate let me explain* 
If you have worked 73 countries in 
the first 73 days of 1973. you have 
qualified for the certificate and all 
you have to do is either send us your 
cards or just get three licensed ham 
friends to certify the copy of the 
list of the stations you contacted in 
the first 73 days of 1973 and we will 
send you your certificate. This is 73*s 
year, and NO OTHER MAGAZINE 
can say that ! And, this certificate 
is being issued for this momentous 
occasion and this will never happen 
again until the year of 2073 and 
YOU wont be around then to help 
73 magazine celebrate. 

Plenty of places around the Mid 
East that are gradually becoming rare 
DX again. Such an ex-common place 



as VS9A-Aden is one of them and 

then there is Kama ran Island that 

was always more or less rare^ now 

very rare. There Is a group of islands 
right near Aden» but in the Red Sea 

called the Hanish group, the larger 
one of them Great Hanish is claimed 
by Yemen leaving about 10 smaller 
islands^ un-officially unclaimed. Here 
is a good possible '*new country" for 
some "daring/' adventuresome DX'er 
to go to and operate from, I feel that 
I should warn you though that you 
may have to dodge bullets from two 
directions - The Yemenis and I have 
heard that Israel just might have some- 
one on some or one of them and they 
may not like, uninvited visitors com- 
ing there, looking around, and mayt}e 
"talking" after they depart. If they 
are anything like Kamaran Island they 
can have the place as far as I am con- 
cerned (Kamaran Island is near-by so 
I would assume they are all alike 
more or less,) Very hot, humid, sandy 
with very tittle breeze, and when that 
blows its very hot - sort of like a blow 
torch. From a DX viewpoint, its very 
FB. from ANY OTHER viewpoint its 
"unhealthy". I wonder when that 
part of the world will really open-up 
again - if ever ? 

Looks like good old ten is gone for 
some years, and if things go like they 
did some years back fifteen will be 
the neKt one to be almost gone ex- 
cept a very short time each day and 
some days it never did open up for 
any worthwhile DX to speak of. 
Better get your "needed'* countries 
on fifteen" right now fellows, because 
you might not have that DX in there 
too much longer. Get *em NOW ! 
I wonder what ever happened to 
the plans of Martin, 0H2BH going to 
that "new one" somewhere up around 
the Baltic Sea area ? It was supposed 
to be a Brand New One, or so I under* 
stood. How about it Martin Ole 
Buddy ?. Lets get *'hopping" and put 
it on the DX map, and just exactly 
where is it anyhow ? 

Then there is a little small piece of 
land (actually mountain) at the Kyber 
Pass thats a Neutral Zone, looked like a 
good possibility for a new one when I 
went through Kyber Pass some years 
ago IF you could TRUST those guards 
with those Long Barreled guns who 
act as border guards there • They look- 
ed MAD and MEAN to me ! I didn't 
even SLOW DOWN after being check- 
ed by their Passport control. 

We are still looking for a good Ham 
Cfub in some USA call areas to be 
our WTW check points, no "pay" 
but we will publish the name of the 
various clubs a few times each year 
thus they will get a little "free" 
publicity, which is not bad for them. 



I ( 



JUNE 1973 



13 




1 




^oakmg 



BUI Pasternak WA2HVK/6 
14732 BIythe Street wf 7 
Panorama City CA 

By the time you read this, the first 
WR6 repeater will be in operation. 
The prize WR6AAA call has been 
issued to the Catalina Island Repeater 
which will be going on the air shortly. 
This will also to my knowledge be the 
first amateur repeater to operate from 
an island, and coverage up and down 
the Pacific coastline should be very 
good. I know everyone congratulates 
Catalina on their two firsts. 

As I mentioned last month, my pet 
project has been to try and set up a 
transcontinental repeater link between 
one of the local LA. repeaters and a 
machine on the east coast via tele- 
phone. I already have this end set, but 
need some help from the other side. If 
your group is interested, pie^e get in 
touch with me. This will not be a 
cheap project (unless your club or 
repeater has access to a wats line; we 
don't). Aside from the fun aspect of 
the project, it will enable FMers here 
and back east to exchange ideas on a 
one-to one basis. 

For a long time we have wondered 
when repeaters would settle the ques- 
tion of what type of break meant 
what. Get on one machine and say, 
"Break;" you are welcome- Gel on 
another, do the same, and 25 fellow 
hams jump to tell you that you are 
committing a cardinal sin. About a 
week ago 1 received in the mail what I 
think may be one good way to go and 
present it here for your consideration. 
It corrms from George KITKJ, who 
owns and operates WR2AAA (ex 
WA2SUR)andWAlKGK. 

"U?e lh6 word BREAK if your traffic is 
URGENT (NOT emergency). Use Break^ 
Break Emergency only when life is at stake. 
Traffic reports are not emergencies and 
should not be broadcast to the world at 
large. Call a station on frequency and tall 
him — tveryone else will hear at the same 
time/' 

Basically, what George says, is to 
use your call (i.e., WA2HVK/6 or 
WA2HVK/6 on frequency) to enter a 
QSO already In process, and reserve 
the Break, and Break-Break Emer* 
gency for times only when they are 
necessary. Having operated WA2SUR 
almost from the time it went on the 



air, I know the validity of this system 
first hand, and it works. It's a good 
step in the right direction, and well 
worth consideration as a national 
standard, 

AM repeaters have jammers. They 
come in all styles from the ones who 
like to wipe out a QSO in progre^ 
with an unidentified carrier, to the 
music players, to the type who have 
to prove their lack of manhood by 
uttering obscene language atop 
another QSO. To put it bluntly, there 
are sick people found in every facet of 
life, and we here in ham radio are 
unfortunate enough to have our share. 
It is beyond my comprehension why 
someone would spend the time and 
money nece^ary to join this "un-elite 
club" that gets its kicks by making life 
miserable for everyone else on the 
channel, when the real enjoyment is in 
belonging. 

The best method I know of to date 
in handling one of these problems is 
to simply ignore it* It's not easy^ 
especially if the jammer is aiming his 
attacks at you pereonally. Give a 
jammer an audience and you will have 
him with you for a long, long time. 
Ignore him, and he will eventually 
crawl back into the woodwork. To 
again quote the WR2AAA group, 

"To acknowledge a mit is to encourage a 
nut/' 

If he insists on staying around long 
enough, he will eventually get caught, 
his toys taken away and he may even 
get sent to bed without his supper. 

Heath kit has conrie through as we 
all hoped they would. By the time the 
March issue htt the stands, their VHF 
Scanner was already on the market; 
and now they fiave announced their 
HW202 Two Meter Transceiver, de- 
signed for those of us who like to roll 
our own. It's sure a neat little package 
with that built-in tone burst encoder. 
Now who will be first with a 220 MHz 
transceiver kit? 

That of course gels us to the 
subject of 220 and some good news. 
The WB6ALV and W6FISI0 two meter 
groups are in the process of assenn- 
bling 220 machines, and two others 
are in the works. One belongs to the 
four guys who record meetings for me 
when I can't make it. The other, 
tentatively dubbed 'The (com Ama- 
teur Radio Club" is the brainchild of 
Bill WA6NTW, Max K6GLG and 
Warren WA6JM1V1, It will be com- 
pletely solid state and located on a hill 
1300 feet above the LA. basin. It 
seems that a number of years ago Brit 
had a 220 AM repeater on the air out 
here (probably the first anywhere) but 
took it off the air due to lack of usera. 
We hope his present effort meets with 
greater success. 

Going down by about 150 MHz or 
so, a quick note on 6 meters. While 



activity there is in no way overwhelm* 
ing, there are quite a few stations that 
seem to be dedicated to keeping the 
band alive. Such a group worth noting 
is the Los Angeles Metropolitan Traf- 
fie Net, They meet every evening 
except Sunday at 50.40 MHz AM. I 
happened across the net one evening 
last week, checked in, and originated 
some traffic to Lou K2VMR in New 
York. Lou received the message in less 
than 24 hours and confirmed receipt! 
Now that's what 1 consider traffic 
handling. 

WA2HVK/6 



* 






'iCMt 



^O 




Joe Kasser 

1701 East-West Midway, Apt 205 

Silver Spring MD 209 10 

At this time of the year most of us 
are about to take a well-deserved 
vacation* Those of you coming to 
Washington D,C, might be interested 
in reading about amateur radio in the 
Washington area. 

Two n^eter FM is very active. Thene 
are repeaters on 01-61, 07—67, 
28-88, 31-91, and 37-97 (whistle- 
on) in the area. Both the 01—61 and 
31-91 repeaters have autopatch facili- 
ties. There is no repeater on 34-94, 
but 94 is a well-used simplex channel. 
By the time this article gets into print 
there should also be repeaters on 
22-82 and 25-85. The 25-85 re- 
peater is being assembled by AMSAT, 
so if you wish to talk to ttie active 
AMSAT personnel, carry 25—85. 85 
simplex is being used at present as an 
AMSAT intercom channel, and the 
25-85 repeater is planned to improve 
the coverage. If you are driving into 
Washington, there are also repeaters 
located near Washington, 04-64 is in 
Damascus, Maryland (north of 
Washington on l-7Ds), 16-76 is In 
Baltimore, 13-73 is in Frederick, 
Maryland and 146.46-t47.06 is in 
Annapolis, Although these repeaters 
are some distance from Washington, 
anyone with a handy-talkie In a tall 
hotel will have no trouble in com- 
municating through them. 

Talking of handy-talkies, do you 
own a TR-22? Well, this month's 
column was written with you in mind. 

TR 22 Modifications 

Have you ever waited for a call (on 
the TR 221 in vain, only to find that 
the rig was switched off, or have you 
ever put the rig away for the night and 



14 



73 MAGAZINE 






Another American Favorite! 



A discriminating ham and Yaesu prod- 
ucts go together like that old Amer- 
ican favorite, ham and eggs. That's 
why there's an ever-increasing de- 
mand for the complete line of amateur 
radio products now available from 
Yaesu Musen USA Inc. 

Yaesu products are a natural for 
American hams because of their strict 
standard of high quality. And because 
Yaesu now has its own factory in the 
U.S. to provide direct service and to 
back up its dealers throughout the 
country. 

Another American favorite. Ham and 
Yaesu. 





YAESU MUSEN USA INC. 

7625 East Rosecrans Ave., Unit 
Paramount, California 907/*3 
Phone; (213) 633-4007 



-29, 



YAESU DEALERS: 

HENRY RADIO STORES 

Los Angeles, Anaheim, Calif.; Butler, Mo. 
HAM RADIO OUTLET 

Burlingame, Calif. 
RACOM ELECTRONICS 

Renton, Wash. 
WILSON ELECTRONICS 

Pittman, Nev, 



ED JUGE ELECTRONICS 
Fort Worth, Dallas, Texas. 

AMATEUR ELECTRONICS SUPPLY 

Milwaukee, Wis.; Cleveland, Ohio. 
FRECK RADIO & SUPPLY 
Asheville, No. Carolina. 

HARRISON RADIO 

Farmingdale, New York, Valley Stream, N.Y. 



«M» 



n 



come back the next mornmg to find 
that your batteries are discharged be- 
cause you left the rig on overnight? 
For about SI and a little effort you 
can insure that such things will never 
happen again* The magic cure is 
known as an LED (a light emitting 
diode). This is a solid state lamp that 
will put out a good visible light for 
about 10 mA of current. It is even 
detectable in bright sunlight 

The modification is simple' just 
connect the LED in series with a 1 
KO resistor and put it across the 12V 
supply line. There is plenty of space 
to put the resistor inside the rig- The 
LED can be a Fairchitd FLV-110 or 
other manufacturer's equivalent, I 
used a HP device because it came with 
a handy mounting bushing. The LED 
(and/or bushing) is pushed into the 
hole already drilled in the panel and a 
dab of epoxy cement put on it to hold 
it in place. 

This modification gives the rig a 
power-on Indicator, improves the 
appearance of the TR-22 and should 
be equally applicable to other FM rigs. 

Have you ever wondered what is 
under that "stuck on" label on the 
front panel of the TR-22 (in older 
models}, but have been unwilling to 
find out for fear of defacing the rig? 
Well, wonder no more — for under the 
label is the original panel logo that 
says Trio TR'2200. The panel comes 
off easily and does not leave any 
marks on the panel. Tell someone you 
are running 3 TR-2200 and they will 
say, "What kind of a rig is that?" 

Have you ever had any difficulty in 
remembering what crystals are in 
which switch position? You have? 
Well, W3ATE has come up with an 
ins^nt modification that wit t end that 
problem forever. The TR'22 switch 
knob has a see-th rough section that 
indicates the selected channel 

The modification works like this: 
First, determine the crystal positions- 
Set the knob to position #1, then 
loosen the two screws in the knob and 
remove it* You will then see the 
channel numbers* Prepare some stick- 
on labels as follows: Type on the 
sticky labels the numbers to corres* 
pond to "the crystals - for example, 
91 would be T46.9T MHz and 94, 

146.94 MHz - then stick these labels 
over the switch position numbers. 
You might even make simplex channel 
labels of a different color than the 
rep^ter ones. Then replace the knobs 
and tighten the screws. Make sure the 
knob goes into its original position 
(position #1) when you tighten it up. 
The channel number modification 
is the most painless and should be 
tackled first. When you have done 
that you might develop the courage to 
drill a hole in the panel, but take care. 

G3ZCZ/W3 



'sociAt//; 

EVENTS r 



;mi 



CONTESTS 



MASS, AMATEUR RADIO WEEK! 

The Amateur Radio Operators of 
Massachusetts invite all amateur radio 
operators to participate in the Fifth 
Annual Massachusetts Amateur Radio 
Week, Certificates of Recognition will 
be issued to all amateurs who take 
part in the Operations program for the 
week. Operating times are from 0001 
GMT June 10th to 2400 GMT on 
June 16th. Massachusetts amateurs 
must work 16 other Mass. amateurs. 
The rest of New England, work 8 
Mass. amateurs. All other U.S. ama- 
teurs must work 5 Mass, amateurs. 
DX, including KL and KH, must work 
2 Mass. amateurs. Any band and mode 
may be used, 

Appficants must include a No. 10 
size stamped, self -addressed envelope 
(DX enclose 1 IRC} with their appli- 
cation, which must be received no 
later than July 31, 1973, Submit 
applications to William C, Holliday 
WA1EZA, 22 Tmdy Terrace, Canton 
MA 02021. 

ORLANDO HAMFEST 

The Orlando Hamfest/Southeastem 
FM Convention will be held in 
Orlando, Florida June 2nd and 3rd, 
1973, Location: Fairgrounds Exposi- 
tion Hall in downtown Orlando. Fur- 
ther info may be obtained from Clair 
E, "Buzz" Showalter, W4UFU 1810 
Lorena Lane, Orlando FL 32806. 






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DES MOINES HAWKEYE HAMFEST 

The Des Moines Radio Amateur 
Association will hold a Hamfest 
Sunday, June 17, 1973, from 8 a.m, 
to 6 p.m. in the Teen Town Arena of 
the Iowa State Fairgrounds. Give Pop 
a present for Father's Day and bring 
him to the Hawkeye Hamfest. Lots of 
free parking — refreshments — lots of 
room for Flea Market Limited num* 
ber of covered booths and extra tables 
available at small charge. Open area 
inside the arena at no extra charge. 
Dealer displays, valuable prizes and 
XYL activities. Auto races and camp- 
ing on Saturday night, extra. Registra- 
tion $L50 advance, S2.00 at gate. 
Write Des Moines Radio Amateur 
Association, Box 88, Des Moines, 
Iowa 50301. 



RTTY PICTURE - Courtesy K2AGI 



AKRON GOODYEAR PICNIC 

The Goodyear Amateur Radio Club 

(Akron) will hold its 6th Annua! 
Hamfest Picnic on June 17 at Good- 
year Wingfoot Lake Park east of 
Akron, 1 mile west of Suffield, Ohio 
on County Rd. 87 near Ohio Rte 43, 
Join us for an enjoyable day of 
e ntertai n me n t, swap-a nd-sh op , p rize 
awards, and good fellowship. Refresh- 
ments, displays, huge flea market- 
Hours: 10 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Family 
admission $2 prepaid, $2.50 at gate. 
For details, tickets, and map, write to 
Floyd Gilbert, 1976 Newdale Avenue, 
Akron, Ohio 44320. 

CENTRAL KANSAS ARC 

The annual hamfest is scheduled for 
Sunday, June 3, 1973, at the 4-H 
Complex, Kenwood Park, Saltna. For 
early arrivals there will be a dinner 
Saturday evening. Registration starts 
Sunday morning at 9:00 a*m,, with a 
program of interest to OM, YL, XYL, 
and harmonic. Covered -dish lunch 
with beverages supplied by the club. 
TaJk-in on 146.34-94, and 3920 kHz, 
For more information write 
WN0DEa William Peck, 1028 W. 
Ash, Salina, Kansas 67401, 



PENN^ENTRAL HAMFEST 

The tenth annual Penn- Central 
hamfest will be held by the Williams- 
port and Milton clubs on Sunday, 
June 3, 1973, at the Union Township 
Volunteer Fire Co. grounds on Route 
IS in Winfield PA. This informal 
hamfest with indoor and outdoor 
facilities for contests, auction, and 
flea market, will start at 12 noon. 
^ Gate registration S3.00, XYL and 
children free, free parking. Talk-in on 
3940 and 146.52/146.94 MHz. More 
info from Cfair Yeagle WA3QXI, 714 
N. Main, Watsontown PA or call 
717-53809292. 



16 



73 MAGAZINE 



ARMED FORCES CONVENTION 

On-the-air amateur radio facilities 
will be providea by K4NAA during 
the Armed Forces Communications 
and Electronics Association conven- 
tion in June. K4NAA is the official 
AFCEA amateur radio station, provid- 
ing attendees with amateur facilities 
to contact friends during the conven- 
tion on June 5, 6 and 7, 1973. The 
K4NAA portable station will be 
operational from 1000 to 1800 EDST 
with two available positions for CW 
and SSB on the 10, 15, 20, 40 and 80 
meter bands. A specially designed 
QSL card has been prepared. Please 
bring your original FCC license if you 
plan to operate. The convention will 
be held at the Sheraton-Park Hotel in 
Washington, D.C 

WORKED ALL MASS, 
CITIES & TOWNS CONTEST 

In celebration of Massachusetts' 
Radio Week, a contest will be held 
from 0001 GMT June 10th to 0004 
June 14th. One point is scored for 
each station worked, regardless of 
band or mode utilized. There are a 
total of 351 Mass. cities and towns 
and the final score is the no, of 
different Mass. stations vvorked times 
the no. of different cities and towns 
worked. Entries must be recieved no 
later than July 31, 1973, and submit- 
ted to Nina Bobbins, 30 Prospect St., 
Bridgewater, Mass., 02324. For com- 
plete contest rules write to Steven 
Rich WA1DFU Publicity Chairman, 
Massachusetts Chapter National 
Awards Hunters Club, 31 Arlington 
Ave,, Revere MA 02141. 

The Egyptian Radio Cfub Inc, will 
hold its annual Ham-Picnic Sunday 
June 24, 1973 at the Club grounds, 
700 Chouteau Slough Rd„ Granite 
City, Illinois. Something for every- 
one - prizes, games for the children, 
food at the club house, parking for 
swaps — etc. For further info write 
Andy Anderson K9KXP, 1712 Nq. 
Keebler St., Collinsville, Illinois 
62234. 

ROMAN HOLIDAY 

The Rome Radio Club sponsors its 
21st consecutive Ham Family Day on 
Sunday, June 3, 1973, at Beck's 
Grove, 10 miles west of Rome. Tech- 
nical talks, contBSts, equipment dis* 
plays, ladies' and children's fun pro- 
grams. Meetings: The Post Office Traf- 
fic Net, Air Force MARS, and Repeat- 
er Council. Flea market with plenty of 
display space. Registration starts at 
1 1:00 a.m. and ends with that famous 
(all you can eat) steak and chicken 
dinner served at 5:00 p,m. Advance 
reservations: Adults $5.75, children 



under 12, S2.00- under 6, FREE 
Tickets at the gate: add 504. Tickets 
w/o dinner at gate: Adults S2,00, 
children, FREE. Send your reserva- 
tion ASAP to Rome RC, KG, Box 
721, Rome, N;Y. 13440. 

ATLANTA 45th ANNUAL HAMFEST 

This event will be held June 9 and 
10, 1973, at Lenox Square, Atlanta, 
Georgia. Approximatefy 2,500 ama- 
teurs attended last year's hamf est, and 
with the expected continued growth it 
is sure to become one of the biggest in 
the U.S. For information write Phlip 
R, Cass W4BTW, VP Atlanta Radio 
Club and Hamfest Committee Chair* 
man, 175 West Wieuca Road, N.E., 
Atlanta GA 30342, 



3/8 '-24 threaded base to fit standard 
mobite bafi mounts. It has the same 
outstanding electrical characteristics 
as the Model CGT-144, 

For complete specifications contact 
New-Tronics Corporation^ 15800 
Commerce Park Drive, Brook Park OH 
44142. 

DIP SOCKETS 




2m MOBILE COLLINEARS 




Extremely low radiation angle, 5.2 
dB gain over a 1/4 wave ground plane, 
low SWR and wide bandwidth are 
features of Husiler CG-Series Super 
Gain two meter col linear mobile an- 
tennas from New-Tronics Corpora- 
tion. 

Model CGT'144 is a complete sys- 
tem including col linear antenna vwth 
stainless steel radiating sections, 180** 
swivel bait, heavy duty trunk lip, and 
17' Mil Spec RG 58^U coax with 
factory attached connectors. Power 
rated at 200W FM, the completely 
operational CGT-144 has a SWR of 
1,1:1 (typical) at resonance and a 
SWR within 1,5:1 over its 6 MHz 
bandwidth of 143-149 MHz. Overall 
length is 86 inches. 

The Hustler Model CG- 144 consists 
of the 84" coNinear antenna with 




A new line of 14- and 16-pin 
duaf-in-line sockets incorporates a 
tapered entry way for easy automatic 
or manual insertion* The wide, cham- 
fered entry accommodates slightly 
bent or misaligned component pins 
and guides them to strong gold plated 
beryl I iun> copper contacts. The com- 
pact R714-2 and 716-2 sockets reduce 
the height of DIP components by 
nearly 50 percent over conventional 
sockets. The individual contacts are 
precision spaced for insertion in per- 
forated circuit boards and they may 
be placed immediately end-to-end or 
side-by-side for maximum packaging 
density. 

The sockets are available in 1000 
unit packages and also in five unit 
packages for smaller users. Contact 
Vector Electronic Company, 12460 
GiadstOFW Avenue^ Sy/mar CA 91342. 

POSITIVE PC PROCESS 




Vector has introduced a pc board 
that is factory coated with + positive 
photo resist that does away with the 
usual artwork reversing step required 
with negative resist. After using their 
pre-printed pads, contact tabs and 
tape interconnections to lay out the 
full size pc pattern on a piece of clear 
my far film, the completed master is 
placed on the photo sensitized board 
and a contact print is made under 
photo-floods or in strong sunlight. 
The board is then dipped in developer 



n 



JUNE 1973 



17 




World's 



of Aniilifiers 



MonyiflctoNr 



The biggest, broadest, finest line of amateur 
power amplifiers 




2K4 . , • THE 'WORKHORSE" 

The 2K-4 Imear amplifier offers engineerrng, construction 
and features second to none, and at a price that makes It 
the best amplifter valye ever offered to the amateur. 
Constructed with a rugged n ess guaranteed to provide a 
long life' of reliable service, its heavy duty components 
aMow it to (oaf along even at full legal power If you want 
to put that strong clear signal on the air that you've pro^ 
bably heard from other 2K users, now is the time. Move 
up to the 2K-4. Floor console or desk model , . . $845,00 



2K-ULTRA . . - THE "ULTIMATE" 

There has never been an amateur linear ampliffer like 
the new 2K'ULTRA. Small and lightweight, yet rugged 
and reliable ... all that the name implies. The ULTRA 
loafs along at full legal power without even the sound of 
a blower. Its anode heat is silently and efficiently con- 
ducted to a heat sink through the use of a pair of Eimac 
8873 tubes. In factp all of its components are the very 
best obtainable. The price*. « $845. QO 



TEMPO /2001 

Small but powerful^ reliable but in e?t pensive, this ampli- 
fier is another top value from Henry Radio. Using two 
8874 grounded grid triodes from Eimac, the Tempo 20O1 
offers a full kilowatt of power for SSO operation in an 
u n bet iev ably compact package (total volume is .8 cu. ft.). 
The 2001 has a built-in solid state power supply, a built-in 
antenna relay^ and built-in quality to match much more 
expensive amplifiers. This equipment is totally compatible 
with the Tempo One as well as fnost other amateur trans* 
ceivers. Completely wired and ready for operation, the 
2001 includes an internal blower, a relative RF power in- 
dicator, and full amateur band coverage from 80-10 
meters. $545,00 

TEMP0/6N2 

The Tempo 6N2 combines most of the fine features of 
the 2001 for 6 and 2 meter amateur operation. The am* 
plifEer uses the sarne small cabinet, the same modern 
tubes, the same inherent quality for 2000 watts PEP 
input on SSB or 1000 watts input on FM or CW. The rig 
is completely wired in one small package with an internal 
soHd'State power supply, built-in blower, and RF relative 
power indicator, S595.00 

3K-A COMMERCIAL/MILrTARY AMPLIFIER 

A high quality linear amplifier designed for commercial 
and miiitary uses. The SK-A employs two rugged Eimac 
3-&00Z grounded grid triodes for superior linearfty and 
provides a conservative three kilowatts PEP input on 
SSB with efficiencies in the range of 60%. This results 
in PEP output in excess of 2000 watts. In addition, the 
3K A provides a heavy duty power supply capable of 
furnishing 2000 watts of continuous duty input for either 
RTTY or CW with 1200 watts output. Price . . , $1080.00 

Prices subject to change without notice. 



11240 W. Olympic Blvd. Los Angeles. Calif. 90064 213/477 6701 
931 N. Euclid, Anaheim. Calif. 92801 714/772 9200 

Butler. Missouri 64730 816/679 3127 

World's Largest Distributor oj Amateur Radio Equipment" 



I 



18 



73 MAGAZINE 



I 



they're both 
Tempo... so 

you can't 
go wrong 



THE 
TEMPO 



200 




LINEAR AMPLIFIER 



Small but powerful, reliable but inexpensive, this 

amplifier is another top value from Henry Radio. 
Using two 8874 grounded grid triodes from Eimac. 
the Tempo 2001 offers a full 2 KW PEP input for 
SSB operation in an unbelievably compact pack* 
age (total volume is .8 cu, ft.). The 200t has a 
built-in solid slate power supply, a built-in antenna 
relay, and built-in quality to match much more ex- 
pensive amplifiers. This equipment is totally com- 
patible with the Tempo One as well as most other 
amateur transceivers. Completely wired and ready 
for operation, the 2001 includes an internal blower, 
a relative RF power indicator, and full amateur 
band coverage from 80-10 meters. PRICE; $545.00 



THE 

TEMPO 





The Tempo 6N2 combines most of the fme features of 
the 2001 for 6 and 2 meter amateur operation. The am- 
plifier uses the same small cabinet, the same modern 
tubes, the same Fnherent qyality for 2000 watts PEP 
input on SSB or 1000 watts input on FM or CW. The rig 
is completely wired in one small package with an internal 
solid state power supply, built-m blower, and RF relative 
power indicator, $595.00 

Prices subject lo charge without notice 



/ 



/ 



11240 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. Calif. 90064 

213/477-6701 
931 N. Euclid, Anaheim. Calif. 92801 714/772-9200 
Butler, Missouri 64730 816/679-3127 



"World's Largest Distributor of Amateur Radio Equipment" 

JUNE 1973 




and HENRY RADIO 



mSL 



antenna 



THE MODEL 4-BTV 
FIXED STATION 
TRAP VERTICAL 

40 through W meters 



ONE SETTING FOR TOTAL 
BAND COVERAGE 

• Lowest SWR— PLUS! • Bandwidth at its 
broadest! SWR 1 .6 to 1 or better at band 
edges. • Hustter exclusive trap covers 
"Sprjtz'' extruded to otherwise unattainable 
close tolerances assuring accurate and 
permanent trap resonance. • Solid one 
inch fiberglass trap forms for optimum elec- 
trical and mechanical stability, • Extra 
heavy duty aluminum mounting bracket 
with tow I o s s — h i g h strength 
insulators. • All sections 1%" heavy wall, 
high strength aluminum. Length 21" 
5". • Stainless steel clamps permitting 
adjustment without damage to the 
aluminum tubing. • Guaranteed to be 
easiest assembly of any multi-band 
vertical. • Antenna has H"-24 stud at top 
to accept RM-75 or RM-75S Hustler 
resonator for 75 meter operation when 
desired. • Top loading on 75 meters for 
broader bandwidth and higher radiation 
efficiency! • Feed with any length 50 ohm 
coax. ♦ Power capability— full legal limit 
on SSB and CW/» Weight: 15 
pounds • Price: $47.95 Amateur Net 

pAmuth ^Ka&f (WW i^f 



KemMff 

11240 W. Ofympic Blvd.. Los Angeles, Caiif. 900S4 

213/477-6701 
931 H. Euclkt, Anaheim, Calif, 92801 714/772-9200 

Butler, Missouri 64730 816/679-3127 



19 



for about three minutes and the board 
panern will appear, ready for inspec- 
tion and possible retouching. At this 
point the board is complete except for 
etching, drilling and trimming, which 
are normal operations anyway. 

The big advantage with the Vector 
method is that no special equipment, 
other than a nimble set of fingers, are 
required to produce (and reproduce) 
high quaiitv pc boards. Everything 
you need is supplied with one of their 
kits, the + positive photo sensitized 
board, layout tape and film, develop- 
er, the etchant and even a plastic bag 
for use as an etching container One 
happy volunteer working in the XYL's 
kitchen can turn out enough boards in 
an evening to keep his buddies happy 
for a long time. Contact Vector Efec- 
ironic Corps, 12460 Gladstone Ave., 
Sy/marCA 91342, (212} 365-9661 

ALPHA ENCODER 



HEP INDEX 




The new Alpha ST-SBJ-IU/ multi- 
frequency encoder makes it possible 
to encode up to five frequencies of 
sub-audible continuous tone or high 
frequency burst tone (20 Hz to 3000 
Hz) and is ideal where multiple base 
station or multiple repeater tone ac- 
cess is required. 

For rigs not equipped with the 
necessary pin sockets, a kit is provided 
that can be field installed and a five 
position tone selector switch is in- 
cluded along with complete instruc- 
tions. The ST-85J'107 is comprised of 
miniature plug-in thick film hybrid 
modules, which makes changing fre^ 
quencies or adding frequencies excep- 
tionally simple. The thick film hybrid 
technique and the all electronic non- 
reed design, eliminates many of the 
problems generally associated with the 
use of reed relays. There is no falsing 
from vibration and a far greater degree 
of shock resistance from dropping. 

Frequency stability is plus or minus 
5% over a temperature range of -40^ 
to +100^0. Current requirement 3,5 
mAat 12.6V dc. 

For more information contact 
Alpha Electronic Services, Inc., 843 J 
Monroe Avenue, Stanton CA 90680 
(714)821^400. 




The new 1973 Motorola HEP cross 
reference guide contains over 43,000 
isting of transistors^ diodes and SCR's 
\(vith HEP replacements for each. Be- 
sides the 66 pages of listings, there is a 
complete catalog giving ratings, 
characteristics and base diagrams for 
each HEP device. Handy guide lines 
are given that will assist a beginner to 
select and get the most performance 
from HEP substitutions. 

The Cross Reference sells for 50rf at 
most electronics distributors or from 
Motorola Semiconductor Products, 
Box 2953, Phoenix AZ 85036. 

TOUCH TONE PAD 




Just about everyone agrees that the 
ultimate in FM operation is a hand 
unit that can be carried everywhere. If 
you work through a repeater with 
autopatch or Touch Tone controlled 
functions you could be missing out on 
half of the available enjoyment if you 
can't use them. An accessory Touch 
Tone pad is the answer* 

73 recently had a pad installed on a 
KP 202 hand unit (similar to the 
Tempo/fmh) by Waller Electronics in 
Chevy Chase MD. The job they did 
was superb. Almost looking like origi- 



nal equipment, the pad fits neatly 
under the speaker and projects from 
the front panel about the same dis- 
tance. Practicaiiy no weight is added 
as the tone generator is a miniature IC 
(negative weight!) and the small 
mounting case is of a strong alloy. 

The unit works great. A squeeze of 
the transmit bar puts 16 tones at your 
fingertips so you can place calls 
through the autopatch from the 
weirdest locations imaginable. 

Contact Waller Electronics, P.O. 
Box 9913, Chevy Chase MD 20015, 
30h652'0996. 

MICRO SSTV PICTURES 



1 




An adjustable carriage kit is 
available that enables owners of 
Robot cameras to focus on objects 
smaller than a postage stamp! A vari- 
ation of the tens extension principle, 
the rnodification lets you move the 
vidicon back from its original position 
at the rear of the lens to the proper 
distance required for close-up focus- 
ing. 



The kit is uncomplicated and in- 
stalls in a couple of hours. The car* 
riage mounts between the lens mount 
bolts and the two existing chassis 
holes at the rear of the case. The long 
adjusting screw requires that only one 
hole be drilled for its rear mount 
because its front bearing plate is again 
secured by the lens mount bolts. 
Focusing is achieved by turning the 
adjusting screw which moves the vidi* 
con toward or away from the lens* 
Normal operation of the camera is not 
impaired as the vidicion can be re- 
turned to its original position against 
the camera's hex spacers. 



After the kit was installed in 73*s 
Robot camera, everything was hur- 
riedly connected up. The camera was 
mounted pointing down at the opera- 
ting desk approximately 7 cm away 
from the surface, A quick look around 
for an object on which to focus 
naturally resulted in a copy of the 
latest issue of 75. Positioning a small 
schematic under the lens and turning 
the focus screw resurted in a large 
image of two bias resistors and their 

Continued on page 100... .,. 



20 



73 MAGAZINE 




don * t ev 



r pruofr 




ro< 



I insist that you print ev 



INSURANCE COVERAGE ADVICE 

I am an insurance broker — in New 
York State you are covered for ham 
gear if your car fs broken into. You 
can endorse your auto policy and pay 
a small premium, as i have done on 
my business accounts vwhene the in- 
surance carrier has charged $10 and 
added protection of theft of the entire 
gear It can be obtained — ask your 
local broker. 

Under Homeowner's policies, we 
have paid claims for windstorm da- 
mage^ subject to the Homeowner's 
deductible of S50 or Si 00, to anten- 
na, TV or ham. If the amateur has 
only a Dwelling policy, then have 
your local broker under the Extended 
Coverage endorsement, eliminate 
under Windstorm & Hail the exclusion 
to Radio or Television antennas, in- 
eluding their lead-in wiring, masts or 
towers, and coverage wilt be afforded 
at the rate of $2.81 per $1 00 of value. 
A $1,000 antenna or tower would 
cost $28.10 per year, 

I hope this Helps. 

Larry SchuUnan WA2FVP 

Flushing NY 



FCC = 



W8KID 



The whole chain of events started 
slowiy back in September 1972 when 
Carl K8PAX happened to mention 
that in his business acquaintances he 
had come across another ham with the 
call sign W8KID, but couldn't recall 
any name or address. I assured him 
that my call sign had not lapsed and I 
would appreciate his letting me know 
if he came across the feltow again, I 
dismissed the vifhole thing as a mix-up 
in calts. 

My worst fears were suddenly con- 
firmed just before noon December 21, 
1972. WBK ID/Mobile 8 gave a cafl on 
the Muskegon, Michigan Civil Defense 
Two Meter FM Repeater (KBWNJ 
22/82). Monitoring at the time were 
WA8GVK, WB8HDD, WBaiVHX, 
WA80JI, W8QA0, W8TBP and 
WA8SCS, all of whom recognized the 
call sign but not the voice. Some 
comments about "bootlegging" and 
illegal caN signs were bantered about, 
and then my wife, who had been 
listening to the strange goings on, 
frantically called me in from my job 
of shoveling snow. "Somebody el^ is 
using your call on the repeater/' 
Jackie said. 

I broke in on the frequency only to 
hear WA8GVK return, "W8KID meet 
W8KIDI" Paul Hollinger, the other 



W8KtD, v^s probably just as surprised 
as I at the happening of that day. A 
fellow ham riding with Paul attested 
to the fact, over the air, that he did 
indeed have the call sign W8KID 
assigned to him by the FCC. 

About a month after writing 
Gettysburg on the subject, Richard C. 
Zeigler, Chief, Gettysburg Processing 
Section, sent me a cordial letter 
verifying the call sign was mine and an 
explanation of what had occurred. 

When Paul moved from Area 9 
(formeriy K9GAI) to Area 8 fn Janu- 
ary 1971 the computer mistakenly 
aligned my call sign to him and 
removed my data from the machine. 
When I renewed my license in June 
1972, Paul's data was in turn removed 
from the computer with the resultant 
error of both of us having been issued 
the same call sign. 

By now Paul has probably been 
issued another call sign and hopefully 
there ends the tale of two calls. There 
must be a moral to this whole thing, 
but I'm not about to probe that area, 

Dick Haihawav W8KJD 
Whitehall m 



FCC NO JOKE 

When the FCC dropped the bomb 
last falE (Docket 18803), commonly 

called the new repeater regulations, 1 
was aghast I wrung my hands in 
anguish, thinking of all the money and 
energy we had expended in our re- 
peaters. I had visions of 75% of the 
repeaters going off the air on June 
30th, 

Then the idea struck nr>e — it was so 
obvious, ) had to laugh. It was the 
most ingenious April Fool's joke ever 
devised. 

I listened as the weeks went by to 
the cries of outrage on 94 and 76, 
snickering to myself and feeling some- 
what guilty for not letting them in on 
the big secret. With tongue in cheek, I 
agreed with the cries and moans I 
heard in the QSO's, In times of doubt 
I reassured myself with the fact that 
these vvere grown men at the FCC, full 
of respect and admiration for the 
amateur service. I had to be right or 
else the only other plausible explana- 
tion was a coltecttve loss of sanity. 
Nonsensel 

As April 1st neared, I could hardly 
contain my mirth and excitement. 
The big day arriv^ — I watched the 
early TV news, and there wasn't a 
word. The noon news and hourly 
radio broadcasts came and went and 



there was nothing. The Sunday 

newspaper arrived; I searched it page 
for page, and not a line. It was 
perhaps too inconsequential for the 
news wires. 

That evening I went downstairs and 
copied the MARS RTTY broadcast 
and there wasn't a word, W1AW was 
completely silent on the subject. Well, 
it was Sunday; maybe it was inap^ 
propriate to pull such a monumental 
joke on the Lord's Day. 

All day Monday the ritual was 
repeated and stilt no word. But there 
was still hope — it was probably being 
held up for a first line article fn QST. 
Finally, QST arrived, and with frantic 
fingers I leafed through the pages. Not 
one word about it. Still there was 
hope — if it wras in print at all, it 
would be in 73. 

The new issue of 73 arrived and 
again I scanned page by page only to 
find that I had searched in vain* I 
hung my head, my shoulders sagged. 
It was true! The FCC had lost its 
collective mindf God help us alH 

Bob Hyeman WA8SSM 
Weirton WV 



HELPING HAM NEEDED 

I have recently acquired a piece of 
Navy surplus gear which was made by 
Hammariund. This particular piece of 
gear is a receiver, type CHC 46140, 
model 4BG 2, with a frequency cover- 
age of 54 MHz to 31 MHz. The 
physical layout of the receiver sug- 
gests that perhaps it might be a 
predece^or of the present HQ series. 

First, would you perhaps happen to 
have 9 schematic of this receiver in 
some of your back files? If not, could 
you tell me where I might find one? 
As a subscriber to 73, I have seen 

many ads for surplus; perhaps some of 
these places could help me, 

LL Scott Shannon WASCVl/7 
4216E Mcjuntain Village 
Hounlain Home AFB ID Safr 



CB'er SPEAKS 

Being a CBer myself, 1 can agree 
with the letters you receive about the 
unauthorized use of the 1 1 meter 
band by about 90% of licensed opera- 
tors. 

The only way I can see the practice 
of using CB as a hobby is completely 
close the band, or require a fecial 
license for "bootleg^rs/' Say $50 + 
$10 a watt. 

Keep up the good work. Who 
knows, I may learn enough to pass the 
Novice test some day, 

Sp6 Paul R, Hamson 
Tacoma WA 



How to understand the Govern- 
ment—remember, they don't have 
anybody selling the same thing 
cheaper on the next corner. 

W1QLD 



JUNE 1973 



21 



2 Meter FM 

THE BIG THREE 
FOR 73! 



GTX-1 

10 watts output power nom.; ac- 
comodates 10 channels; rotatable 
frequency selector; adaptable for 
portable operation (with HamPak, 

"'""' $199.95 

(Includes 146,94 MHz} 




GTX-2 

30 watts output power nomM ac- 
comodates 10 channels; push- 
button frequency selection; back- 
lighted for night operation, 

$249-95 

(Includes 146.94 MMz) 




GTX-200 

30 watts output power nom,; ac- 
comodates 100 channel combina- 
tions; features independent selec- 
tion of transmit and receive fre- 
quencies, and switch for pre- 
selected pairing. jjnCQ Qc 

(Includes 146.94 MHzJ 




Made in U.S.A. 
In Fac///f/©s In- 
spected by U. S. 
Gov't 




HamPak 

Battery pack for GTX-10 
portable operation. Uses 

10 D cells (not included). 

fincfudes portabiB antenna, 
carrying handle d mike dip} 




AddTtlonil 

Cnfttoli 

for Kifilt or rec«fv# 



$6.50 

per crystal 



VISIT YOUR LOCAL AMATEUR DEALER 
AND MEET THE "BIG THREE" IN PERSONl 



Geaeral Aviatiofl EleclroaicSi liic, 4141 Kinpan Mn, Indianapolis, Indiana 46226 - Area 317 - &4G-lllt 



Bill Hoisington KICLL 
Farover Farm 
Peterborough NH 03458 




-COST 2 20 M 






ATOR 



This article describes the design and 
construction of an easy to build, inex- 
pensive » crystal controlled signal generator 
for the 220 MHz band, including a very low 
cost attenuator that goes from a quarter volt 
down through l/20th of a microvolt and on 
to a real zero (of rf power). It is very useful 
for receiver front-end tuneup, low noise 
tests, and as a portable field generator for 
overall antenna tests through the receiver. 
For signal identification purposes, af and FM 
modulation are included. 

If you really want to fight for a low-noise 
front end, this piece of equipment will be of 
great assistance to you, because the attenu- 
ation really is infinite and without any 
difficult bypassing or shielding. 

Design of the attenuator. 

Infinite attenuation is achieved here by 
the use of a 50^ piece of aluminum tubing, 



as shown in Fig, L You cannot drive 220 
MHz signals more than a few inches down 
inside of a piece of aluminum tubing. By 
putting everything — battery, on -off switch, 
circuit and all — on the movable generator 
strip and sliding it in and out of the tubing, 
you avoid all touchy, difficult and expensive 
bypassing, costly attentuator pots, shielding;^ 
etc., and provide a simplified means of 
varying the attenuation with stable, smooth, 
easy repeatability. Cahbration is of the shde 
rule variety and also simple as far as writing 
down the microvolts on the scale is con- 
cerned. 

This principle is older than radio tubes; in 
fact Sir Oliver Lodge used it in his 1890 
microwave work. 

Attenuator Construction Details 

Figure 1 tells most of the story, v^th 
details in Figs. 2 through 9. An adequate rf 



STANDARD ALUMINUM MAST, I 1/4 INCH D., 46 tm LONG F 



COPPER 



SWITCH 







<v 



WOOD DOWEL 



iywyyw >f^^^y\vyyyy^ ^ ^ ^ ^ >f ^ / ^ y>^^ a ^ j // 



COPPER CLAD, 2.3 cm WIDE. 21.5 em LONG 




Z cm 
ROUND 



Fig. 1. Sidemew, 220 signal generator and infinite attentuator. 



EW PLATE 

COP PER 
PHONO JACK 



OUTPUT 



INSULATE 



JUNE 1973 



23 



WLikCK FIBER 
OR SIMILAR 



O 



o 



FASTEN UNDER 
PUSH ROD 




Fig. 3. Cable end view tubing. 



-WOOD DOWEL 
PUSH ROD 




WOOD 
2 cm THICK 



ALUMIfJUM MAST 



Fig. 2. Top view of the 220 signal generator and 
detaUs of the calibration pointer. 



seal can be made at the pickup end of the 
aluminum tubing, standard TV masting, 114 
O.D., by 2 or 4 tabs in one end as in Fig. 3 
and bending them back as shown, then 
cutting off the excess tubing. Install the 
pickup, plate, output jack, and end plate as 
shown in Fig. 1 . I used time-saving external 
mounts for fastening it down to the wood 
baseboard as shown in Figs, 2 through 5, 
Drill a 1^ in. hole for a screwdriver as in Fig. 
2^ and use angles for the pickup end. Figure 
2 also shows the scale in use for attenuation 
settings, and Fig. 3 shows pointer details. 
Figures 6 and 7 show pictorials of the 
layout, top view and side view. 

The Generator 

Nothing too fussy here, but attention to 
details will assure reliable af and rf oscilla- 
tion at low power and low battery drain and 
good frequency multiplication. Figure 8 
shows the schematic with the details of the 
two oscillators, the crystal in the 44 MHz 
range, and the quintupler. The af uses a 
standard circuit which, however, has one 
item to watch. Contrary to a transformer 
coupled circuit, which is seldom mentioned, 
this twin-T job has a nasty trick of not 
starting every time. However a small cap 
from collector to ground cures this and 
makes it 1 00% reliable in that respect. The 
emitter being groimded, I suppose this estab- 



lishes the correct in-phase relation with the 
collector, in which both of these elements 
should be in phase. You can put a small trim 
pot af gain control between the modulator 
and the oscillator if you wish, watching out 
for dc voltages of course. As shown here, 
there is plenty of modulation for signal 
identification, both AM and FM. 

Referring to Fig. 8, at the left is the af 
oscillator. It is not down symmetrically, but 
you can note the two 22K resistors and the 
two -02 frequency settling caps, along with 
the .05 and the 2.2K terminating the lines. 
All of these set the frequency, and to change 
the frequency you should vary all of them in 




CZZZI^oiZZZ] 



Fig. 4. Open end view. 

at least their approximate present ratios. It 
is around 500 cycles as shown. Do 
not forget the ^'starting cap" from collector 
to ground. 

This audio is fed to the base of the 
multiplier where it provides some AM and 
some FM modulation for signal identi- 
fication purposes. When working with receiv- 




jv////y///wooD ///T/y/zA 



Fig. 5, Side view. 



24 



73 MAGAZINE 



SWITCH 
SOLDER 



HEP75 




SOLDER- 



Fig, 6A. Layout, top view. 



SOLDER 




f-tffj^ff^f^f*<ff*r 



\f^JJJ:fff:f*^ff^f* 



COPPER CLAD BASEBOARD 



COMMON PIN 

DRILL HOLE AND 
HAMMER IN 

FIBER 




Fiq. 6B, Tie-point construction. 

er oscillators, and in particular with high- 
ratio multipliers, this is very important. It 
may also be locked into any old scope sync 
for noise figure and sensitivity comparisons. 
The scope sync gives a reference point where 
the signal to noise ratio will always be the 
same, without resorting to guess work. The 
crystal oscillator is my old tried and true 
ciystal phase-reversing job, which uses nega- 
tive feedback from the collector coil, which, 
after going through the crystal, reverses 
phase and becomes positive, thus assuring 
oscillation but only on the crystal frequen- 
cy. A HEP 75 (similar to the famous 3866) 
is used for the quintupler. A lot more output 
is noted with this powerful but smooth 
operating old faithful, still good to 450 
MHz. 



The output goes to the antenna plate on 
the forward end of the baseboard plank. 
When this plate is moved all the way in so 
that it is only Va in. from the cable pickup 
plate in the end of the aluminum tube, a full 
scale reading may be obtained on a 50 
microamp meter on the output of a tuned 
diode detector (see Fig. 9). My first model 
here has marks on the scale (see Fig. 2) for 1 
rf stage; 2 rf stages; mixer (feeding into a 
good i-f strip); mixer plus 1 rf, etc. At the 1 
rf plus mixer, you begin to hear all the 
repeaters within 100 miles or so. With 2 rf 
plus mixer (followed by a sensitive i-f of 
course) you are really getting sensitivity. 
This is where you put a scope in line in order 
to have an electronic comparison point for 
signal coming out of the noise purposes, and 
then can really get into the low-noise bit, if 
you have a hermit location. Just happens I 
have one here. When 1 hear the noise of a 
car, it's a visitor! 

Output 

You will see for yourself as soon as you 
start testing that the attenuator is smooth- 
working and stepless, and that true infinite 
attenuation is at hand. An rf input state 
(pre-amp) with a noise figure a fraction 
better than another shows right away on the 



COPPER SIDE 




9 V BATTERY 




SUeMINIATURE SWITCH 



2 TIE POINTS 
FOR AF CIRCUIT 



4 TIE 
POINTS 



ur^ji^j-yy 




COPPER^ 




HEP 75 



/-rfSK f ■ ifir^^^^A^ 



/y/A 




JJ 



HEP 55 

AF OSC 



y 



HEP 55 

WITH 5 
TIE POINTS 
RF OSC. 



9^ 



\ 




^ARCO 404 SOLDER 

8-fiO TRIMMER 



Fig. 7. Side view of the signal generator, 220 MHz. 



JUNE 1973 



25 



■ 




Reg^noy S liffeter yi,£ — A^imerioaxi made aut Import prloes 

Instant access to 144 frequency pairings with 
20 watts out on the new HR-212 twelve channel 
2 Meter FM Transceiver by Regency 

Specifications 

Power Output: 20 watts 
(nom.) at 13.8 V DC 

frequency Range: 
144-148 MHz 

Channels: 12; 

crystal controlled 

Sensitivity: 0.4 uv, 
20 DB quieting 

Spurious Rejection: 60 DB 




Model HR-212 $259 Amateur Net 

Includes microphone^ mounting bracket and factory 
installed transmit and receive crystals for 146.94 MHz. 



for all your 2 Meter FM needs 






Model HR-2MS 8 channel 
Transcan^*** with signal search 
reception and 15 walls mifiinnum 
ou^yi. $319.00 Amateur Net 



Model HR-2A 6 channel 
transmit, 12 receive 2 Meter FM 
Trarsceiver with 15 watts minimum 
output, $229,00 Amateur Net 



Model AR-2 Amplifier boosts 

2 Meter FM output power 

300%. 

$119.00 Amateur Net 




^ 



€^€>*\Cy Electronics, Inc. 

7900 Pendleton Pike 



Indianapolis, Indiana 46226 



K^egexioy S Itfeter F'M; — A^Jixi&riQATk maci© at Import prloea 



scale. For example, adjustment of the fixed 
bias voltages on the two gates of a 3N200 or 
3N201 shows right away on the scale as the 
push-rod is moved in and out and the signal 
is locked onto the scope. This work you can 
do right on the bench and at low cost. ' 



There is quite a bit of mechanical work in 
the unit J depending on just how much 
''finish" you want it to have. You can also 
bring a dowel rod for ''on and off" use. 
Do not, under any circumstances, bring out 
a conductor. You can do this, but only with 




ANTENNA 
PLATE 



RFC y QUJNTUPtER 
HEP 75 




3-30 > J5I 



+ 



"% 



Fig. 5. Schematic, LI - 16 turns No* 26 output tap at 2 turns, crystal feedback tap at 4 turns, from 
cold end. Wound on phenioic form ,6 cm O.D, L2 = 6 turns No, 18 bare, air wound, .6 cm 0*D,, Z5 
cm tong between tie points, RFC = about 40 turns No^ 40^ on phenolic form .3 cm O.D,^ 1 cm long 
(not critical I 



26 



73 MAGAZINE 



1.4 cm SPACeHS 



CQPPEI^-CLAO 
COPPEft INSIDE 



PHONO 
JACK 




INSIDE TEFLON 
OF RG'-Se/U 

2.2 pF 

POT LOCKMG 
ASSEMBLY 

KNURLED NUT 

COPPER TUBE 



RG"5e/U 



SOLDER 

BRAID 



VARIABLE 

CAPACITOR^. M 
lO PLATE TOtAL.M 
PROQABLY" 25 pF 
TOTAL 

COPPER OR BRASS CENTER STRAP 
E.5cm WIDE, SET VERTICALLY 






JO X 10 cm 
PANEL 



POfNTER 
KNOB 



Fig, 9. Timed diode detector, 160— 460 MHz. 



an extreme amount of filtering, which is not 
part of this article. Be sure to set up the 
baseboard, antenna plate and batteiy first, 
and get them worldng mechanically. With a 
drawn-out shape like this I generally start 
with a longer piece of copper-clad than 
needed, build from one end, and then cut 
off what is left over. Understandably, once 
you have made the first one you can always 
see, after it is done, many ways of improving 
it. However, someone has to make the first 
one, and that's generally my job- 
Antenna and Field Tests 

Out of the tubing, and with a small 
antenna connected via a one turn link 
around the quadrupler coil and then to 
ground, returning L2 for maximum output, 
this little rig puts out a lot of signal on 220, 
Especially if you reduce the oscillator emit- 
ter resistor! Up to several volts of rf can be 
obtained in a tuned diode receiver if you push 
things along, which is around 5 to 10 mW, If 
you place this generator out in a field several 
hundred yards or more away, you can then 
line up your antenna on the car or house, 
check antenna cables^ antenna input align- 
ment, and match or mismatch for lowest 
noise figure, etc. 

Front end alignment should first be done 
with a relatively broadband i-f strip on 1 0.7 



MHz. Be sure nothing metallic on the genera- 
tor strip protrudes enough to touch the 
inner wall of the tubing, or "scratch" will 
occur in the high gain receiver. A piece of 
thin fiberglass or other insulating sheet 
wrapped around the whole generator 
movable plank is a good precaution. 

Once again I include a 220 MHz tuned 
diode detector, which is an absolute must 
for frequency multiplication, especially 
quintupling and such, where the other un- 
wanted harmonics are as little as 20% away 
from the desired frequency. Figure 9 shows 
this piece of test equipment in pictorial 
schematic form. Remember, shape is of 
considerable importance as you go from 
VHF into UHF. It is quite easy to make the 
square trough line out of an old piece of 
copper clad. Or even a new piece! And this 
particular one described and shown in Fig. 9 
goes very well to over 450 MHz and thus is 
very nice for the next band also. If you 
make it just as IVe shown it, it will do a 
good job for you. 

Calibration will present some difficulties, 
so line up some other lads around who are 
already on these bands and get your cahbra- 
tion that way. 

So good luck, friends, more coming — 
lot's more! Keep reading. 

.. KICLL 



JUNE 1973 



27 



Address 






DRUSH 



DRUSH DRUSH 

(check one} 



State 



ZIP 



enclosed 



TRANSCEIVER 



D Drake TR-22 
n Drake TR-72 
□ Drake IVIL-2 
D Ken KP 202 
D Regency HR 
D Ross & White 
D Simpson 
a SB- 144 
D Sonar 3601 
D Standard 1461 A) 



a Standard 826 
D Swan FIVI2X 
D Tempo FMH 
D Tempo FMP 
D Tempo FMV 
□ Tempo FMA 
D Tempo FMC 
D Trio 2200 
D Trio TR 7200 



TRANSMIT PAIR REC 


EIVE r 


1 


Q 


146.01 61 


D ^ 


n 


146.04--64 


D ^ 


n 


146.07 67 


n ^ 


n 


146.10-70 


n 


^r^ 


D 


146.13 73 


n 


^ 


n 


146.16-76 


n 


^ 


n 


146.19-79 


D 


^ 


n 


146.22 82 


D 


<^ 


D 


146.25-85 


n ^ 


D 


146.28-88 


□ '<g 


□ 


146.31 91 


n 


<^ 


□ 


146.34^94 


n 


M 


D 


146.37-97 


D 


m, 


D 


146.40 147.00 


D ^ 


D 


146.52-52 


□ 1^ 


D 


146.94 94 
TOTAL 


n 


i 



5?(!^^^iVALPEY FISHER CORP. 75 SOUTH STREET, HOPKINTON, MA 01 748 



Crystals are available for the following two meter 
FM transceivers at this special price offer: Drake, 
Regency, Simpson, SBE, Sonar, Standard, and 
Tempo, Piease specify the make and model trans- 
ceiver when you place your order so we can be sure 
to send you the correct compensated Crystals, 
A series of crystals will soon be available for the 
147 MHz segment of the band, so v^tch our ads 
for this announcement. The only way we can make 
c^rystals available at the $3.75 price is by making 
them in large Quantities — so we ask that you order_ 
from the above list — and ONLY from the above 
I i St , Special orders can be handled, but we don't 
encourage them since they take much longer to fill 
and cost considerably more. H your order can be 
cnecked off on the above order blank it can be 
filled quickly. 



just «3;'' each 

. . .plus 5(W per complete order for postage 
and handling. 

This low price for Drake — Regency — 
Simpson — SBE — Sonar —Standard — 
and Tempo. ONLY 



Eastern customers may appreciate our fast ma it service ... it can save you days to weeks on your 
order. Western customers may appreciate getting crystals that work on channel the very first time and 
don't have to be returned for further compensation to match your set. 



Valpey Fisher— 40 long hard years of experience. 

fflCORP. Dealers - Have we got a deal for youfff 

A VALTEC CORPORATlOy 
75 SOUTH STREET. HOPKINTON, MA 01748 



VAIPEY 




61 7-435-6831 



28 



73 MAGAZINE 



John J. Schukz W2EEY 
1829 Cornelia Street 

Brooklyn NY 11227 



AN EXPERIMENTAL 

MINIATURE ANTENNA 



or 40 to 80 m 



Aclive, subminiature antennas have been publicized in many technical 
journals recently. Here is discussed the nature of such antennas and 
their applicability to amateur radio usage. An experimental antenna 
developed by the author is also described. 



The term "active antenna" has come 
into usage recently to describe anten- 
na forms which use semiconductor ele- 
ments as an integral part of the antenna 
structure- Probably every reader has seen 
photographs of some form of this type of 
antenna where an antenna a few inches 
long is claimed to have the same perfor- 
mance (for receiving purposes) as a regular 
antenna of 1 to 20 times the size. 

Whether the performance which is 
claimed is really true or not is still a 
question debated by many scientists and 
engineers. It would appear to be simple 
enough to take such an antenna and switch 
a receiver back and forth between it and a 
regular antenna for comparison purposes. 
However, such tests still leave many ques- 
tions unanswered because the active ele- 
ments in the antenna alter the noise figure 
of the entire receiving system. Therefore, 
the question remains of whether the active 



elements in the antenna really act to 
produce a new type of antenna form or 
simply act as a sort of very low noise level 
preamplifier for the receiver* 

The purpose here is not to make any 
definite judgment about active receiving 
antennas. 1 do not advance any claim to 
having solved any of the scientific ques- 
tions regarding the true value of active 
antennas. However, such forms of antennas 
do present a tremendously interesting op- 
portunity for amateurs to experiment with 
antenna forms since only simple materials 
and components are necessary. Once one 
has constructed an active antenna that 
performs as well, or nearly as well, as a 
full-size antenna, one can really appreciate 
the scientific confusion that such antenna 
forms can generate. 

Why Build an Active Antenna? 

A logical question to ask is what value 
an active antenna would be. Even if one 



JUNE 1973 



29 



could wire together a few transistors and a 
few pieces of wire a few inches long that 
duplicated the reception results achieved 
with a 30—40 ft wire antenna, of what 
value would the antenna really be since the 
full-sized antenna is necessary for transmit- 
ting purposes anyway? If one were engaged 
only in receiving operations, the value of 
such an antenna is clear, but there is also a 
good reason for using such an antenna even 
when a full-size transmitting antenna is 
available- That reason is directivity. Often, 
particularly on the lower frequency ama- 
teur bands, almost any good receiver has all 
the sensitivity available that is useful. 
Contacts are lost or DX stations not heard 
because of QRM. Selectivity devices within 
the receiver can be used to eliminate QRM 
to a degree, but relatively few amateurs 
also have available rotary antenna arrays, 
so antenna directivity can also be used to 
null out QRM sources. A small active 
antenna gives rise to the possibility of 
having available a smalL easily rotatable 
antenna for receiving purposes that can be 
used to improve reception by means of its 
directivity. Such an antenna might be used 
indoors or outdoors, to replace or supple- 
ment the full-size transmitting antenna for 
reception purpose s< 




w 



pnE AmPL 




(B) 



Definition of an Active Antenna 

When an antenna design is that of an 
active antenna instead of just a short 
antenna with a preampUfier is sort of a 
moot question and perhaps the question at 
the base of the overall discussion on the 
value of active antennas. As shown in Fig, 
1, one can visualize the question starting 
with the placement of an auxiliary pre- 
amplifer stage immediately at the input to 
a receiver at the terminals of the antenna, 
or within the antenna structure. 

The role and performance of the pre* 
amplifier when placed immediately at the 
receiver, or at the terminals of a conven- 
tional antenna form are clear — as long as 
the input and output impedance levels of 
the preamplifier are known and are con- 
stant. Generally speaking, one converts 
from the conventional role of a pream- 
plifier to an amplifier used as part of an 
active antenna when the amplifier also 



^0MPL 



I 



^^ 




CO 



Fig. 1, The term ** active antenna does not have 
a rigorous definition . However^ it can be visu* 
aUzed as a progression of the idea of using a 
preamp before a receiver (A) and (B). In the 
active antenna (C), the active device is part of the 
antenna structure and may act as a matchin^j 
device as well as an amplifying device. 



30 



73 MAGAZINE 



performs a matching or coupling function 
either at the base or internally to an 
antenna form. If the active device can 
perform this function over the impedance 
range necessary and in a very efficient 
manner, one can develop a physically smaU 
antenna that will perform the same as a 
full-size antenna. If one goes back and 
reads over basic antenna theory, it will be 
found that theoretically the signal pickup 
possible with a very short antenna, say 
O.lX, is essentially the same as that possible 
with a 0,5A antenna. The reason the O.lX 
antenna does not perform as well in reality 
as the 0.5X antenna is that power cannot 
be as efficiently extracted from it because 
of the loss in matching circuits- The active 
elements in the active antenna are sup- 
posed to perform this function in an 
efficient manner, not just act as a preampli- 
fier. 

Active antennas can take a variety of 
forms -- there are few ground rules to go 
by. Most of the forms which have been 
developed have been developed on a strict- 
ly experimental basis and it often seems 
that the more detailed, scientific explana- 
tion of why an antenna works is developed 
after an experimentally derived form 
proves interesting. So, an amateur inter- 
ested in experimenting with such antennas 
need not feel inhibited because of any lack 
of detailed knowledge of antenna theory. 
The antenna described next, which I devel- 
oped for experimental purposes^ is one 
example of an active antenna form. 

An Experimental Active Antenna 

Figure 2 shows the circuit of an exper- 
imental active antenna that I developed as 
a single-band antenna for use on the lower 
frequency amateur bands. The main fea- 
tures of the antenna are its relatively small 
size, directivity, and the use of two low- 
noise MOSFET stages. The basic scheme of 
the antenna was to use a tuned loop of 
relatively low Q for broadband operation 
over one amateur band phase coupled via a 
FET to a *'sense'* antenna for a unidirec- 
tional reception pattern. 

As can be seen from Fig. 2, one 3N142 
FET is used at the apex of the loop to 
couple the loop to a short vertical antenna. 



K} tn LC WIRE OA NOD 



LOOP OF NO, IZ AWS WIRE 
ABOUT 10 TO iZ in IN OIA. 




SD*TO^ LIE 
TO PifiCEIVER 



#-^0+»HO VOC 



»A00ITI0NAL FIXED WICA 
CAPAClTOft AS NECESSARY 
TO TUNC \JyQP OH OeSiREO 
BAAfO. 



SOUWCE 



DftAl 




BOTTOW VIEW 
3MI4B 



Fig. 2. Diagram of active antenna which author 
experimented with for use on 80 or 40 meters. 

The design is strictly experimental but seemed to 
yield very useful results. 



The loop is tuned to 80 or 40 meters by 
the trimmer capacitor at the base of the 
loop. The tuning is quite broad because the 
drain— source resistance of the FET at the 
apex of the loop is in series with the loop. 
The trimmer capacitor also serves the 
function of dc voltage isolation, since the 
drain potential is routed to the FET over 
one side of the loop. The other side of the 
loop is brought to ground via the source 
resistance for the FET. The signal output 
from the loop is therefore achieved with 
the FET at the apex of the loop acting as 
both a couphng stage and an amplifier with 
a source-follower output. The output of 
the loop is coupled to another 3N142 FET 
used as a source-follower stage. This stage 
is used to isolate the output of the loop 
from the heavy loading effect of the 50S2 
transmission line to a receiver. The current 
drain of both FET stages is very low (a few 



JUNE 1973 



31 



I 
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I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 




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QRPp 

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miUiamps) and can be supplied from any 
battery source of 9- 1 8V- 

My original antenna for low frequency 

bands was of experimental construction. 



Later on^ perforated board was used to 
mount the components and to act as a 
vertical support for the antenna. There is 
no need to shield the stage at the base of 
the loop. The only tuning adjustment for 
the loop, the trimmer capacitor at the base, 
can be peaked under actual reception 
conditions. 

The actual reception results with the 
antenna were a mixture of interesting 
observations. Compared to a full-size quar- 
ter-wave vertical on 40 meters, the antenna 
delivered signals only about an S-unit 
lower! However, the **active" antenna was 
used directly on top of the receiver indoors 
while the vertical was mounted outdoors in 
a clear field. On 80 m, the active antenna 

performed about the same as compared to 
the 40m quarter-wave vertical base-loaded 
for use on 80m. The active antenna ex- 
hibited fair to good directivity. The back 
null, as one might expect from an antenna 
with a cardioid pattern, was not as sharp 
nor as deep as usual* The front-to-back 
ratio was in the order of 10—15 dB, Such a 
ratio certainly is useful for QRM reduction, 
but is usually better with a full-size anten- 
na. By varying the length of the 10" rod at 
the apex of the loop it appeared possible 
to also optimize the directivity on any 
given band. 



Summary 

was my first experience with the 
actual construction of an active antenna, 
although much study had been done on 
such antenna forms. As is perhaps usual 
with any instance of actual experience 
versus studied time, some surprises were 
experienced. The active antenna performed 
surprisingly well, even though it was crude- 
ly constructed. To see a relatively small 
antenna deliver almost as good reception as 
a full-size antenna is quite surprising. Tlie 
directivity of the active antenna could 
certainly be better and this direction in 
experimentation may prove to be the most 
fruitful since the basic signal pickup of a 
small active antenna on the lower fre- 
quency bands seems to be more than 
adequate, 

. . ,W2EEY 



32 



73 MAGAZINE 




escape from the 2 meter crowd 



The all new 

220 MHz Clegg FM-21 Transceiver 
puts you in tomorrow's channels today! 



220 MHz FM is the earty solution to 
overcrowded 2 meter channels. Here's 
your chance to get in on the ground 
floor of the FM future. The new FM-21 
aff solid-state transceiver is an oppor- 
tunity to ''do it right" this time and 
start with the leader. The FM-21 uses 
only 1 crystal in any channel , , • one 
crystal gives you a separate transmit 
and receive frequency as well as auto- 
matic 1.6 MHz programming in the re- 
peat mode. We call this unique triple- 
duty crystal feature Clegg Crystal Saver 
Frequency Control, For the complete 
story, see your Clegg Dealer or call or 
write us today for detailed data sheet 
and avoid the crowd. 



Amateur Net $299.95 



CHECK THESE FEATURES 

8-10 watts output (minimum). 

Speech clipping. 

Sensitive receiver — .25 /iv (max.) 
for12dbSinad. 

Selecflvfty — ^Adjacent channel (40 
KHz) down 50 db. 

Each crystal does triple-duty, pro- 
viding a transmit and receive fre- 
quency (Crystal Saver Frequency 
Control). 

Monolithic crystal filter. 

Compact, 7" x 2%" x 9" 



WTiMATfOHM 




£ks9. 



DIVISION 



'Ot^otinu* 



30S0 Hempland Roadt Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17601 

T«h (717) 2B&•*Z67^ Telex: 04*0408 



JUNE 1973 



33 




See Press, the.,, 

MEELER 




He'll beat any deal anywhere! 

Telephone us at NO CHARGE anywhere in the U.S.A. 

If you make an order, send us a copy of your telephone bill and we'll send you a check. 



r 



PLUS, we ship FREE anywhere by U.P.S. 



4033 BROWNSVILLE RD.,TR£VOSE,PA. 19047 



34 



73 MAGAZINE 




HAMTMNiCS CKfSTAL BANK! 

$30,000 worth of crystals are in the crystal bank. Buy a crystal now. If you need to 
change frequencies later we'll swap. 

Now there is no chance of you ever having outdated crystals. Make a deposit in the 
Hamtronics Crystal Bank today. 



■■ 




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WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE! 
$100.00 will be paid to anyone in the U.S.A. 



he can get a BETTER DEAL 




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See Press for the LOWES 1 PRICES anywhere 

* 

in the U.S.A. 


1^ 


PHONES 
1 (215)357 1400 


(215)757 5300 


JUNE 1973 


35 








SSB and AM 

push button 
selection. 



six shooter 

SBE scores again, encourages occupancy o1 the 
higher frequency amateur bands with moderately 
priced, full-feature equipment. 

Now — ^hit those challenging 6 meter targets — be 
thcrt^ — be ready instantly for those thrilling DX 
breakthroughs and skip happenings, in the interimt 
join a select group who have discovered that 
mobile SSB on the low end of 6 approaches the 
ideal for solid, uncluttered local contacts. Here 
now^ — from SBE, SB- 50. a very tidy package 
that provides all the ammo you need for 6 meter 
bullseyes! Synthesized frequency selection is an 
example in point: No crystals to buy, no concern 
about VFO stability. The band between 50.050 and 
50-280 MHz is divided into 23 channels, spaced 
at lOkHz intervals- A clarlfier control allows the 
master crystal frequency to be moved anywhere 
between two 10kHz points, SBE, SB -50, fs a 
transceiver but switching to RIT enables a drifting 
signal to be zeroed without affecting transmitter 
frequency, A fine receiver with high sensitivity 
insures that the weak ones will be heard during 
band openings. Exclusive SBE **Super Shape'' BP 
filters provide excellent SSB/AM response, tjoth 
transmit and receive. A fighted panel meter monitors 
what's coming in — and going out. Squelch, noise 
iimiter contribute to performance. Power input is 
20 watts p.e.p, on SSB, 8 watts on AM, Equipment 
is all solid state, easy on car battery. Dynamic 
microphone is provided 



IT AT YOUR SBE DEALER 





SYNTHE' 
SIZED I 

No crystals 
to buy. 




Tunable ±6kHz, 
any 10kHz 
point. 

Receiver 

frequency 
separately 

adjustable 
with RIT 



m ta 



Lighted meter 

shows ''S** units 
receive — power 
output SSB/AM 



SBE exclusive 

''Super Shape'* 
Bandpass 
SSB filter 



m ■« 



All solid State. 
Low drain on 12V 
car battery. 

■SBEI 

LINEAR 
SYSTEMS, INC. 

220 Airport Blvd. 
Watsonville, CA 
95076. 



J. A. Houser K2EE 
23 Washington Street 
Rensselaer NY 



AN 




PROV 




UHF POW 




OUTPUT 




On page 207 of the Handbook, 1972 
edition, in regard to a description of a 
simple varactor tripler for 432 MHz, is a 
statement out of context; **Most construc- 
tors will find they have to spend more time 
making test gear to check the varactor than 
in building the multiplier itself. _ .most of 
the dummy loads available to amateurs are 
too reactive at 432 MHz to be any good . . . 

A power indicator is the hardest item of all 
to come by." 

This article will describe a UHF power 
output meter which is relatively non-reactive 
(vswr less than 1.5: LO at any point in 
range), will take the average ham less than 
two hours to construct once all parts are 
available, is not difficult at all to come by^ 
and is relatively inexpensive compared to 
any commercial product offered on the 
market today. 

Back in 1948, when the cheapest rf 
power output meter on the market sold for 
$185,00, I developed a reliable, accurate rf 



power output meter which could be home 
brewed by any amateur for less than $20,00, 
{Radio & Television News^ Aprils 1950. J. A, 
Houser, "RF Power Output Meter for VHP 
and UHF/*) This original meter was good 
from 3 to over 300 MHz, with a standing 
wave ratio of less than L5:L0 over the 
entire range — quite exceptional for the state 
of the art at that time. 

Since then the state of the art in measur- 
ing rf accurately and effectively has ad- 
vanced slightly* Therefore improvements 
were made to the original meter and some 
changes incorporated to extend the frequen- 
cy range to past 500 MHz; which meant that 
almost complete redesign and some caution- 
ary factors had to be observed in the use of 
such a meter. One purpose of this article is 
to describe these changes and improvements. 

The first factor or redesign in order to 
extend the UHF frequency range was the 
length of the resistance unit, which in the 
original meter consisted of two stacks of 



JUNE t973 



37 




25 W single range meter, good to over 500 MHz- 

silver-plated composition discs ^ the total 
length of which was 7 in. Simple computa- 
tion shows that the stack length must be 
reduced to much less than this to obviate 
resonant conditions which appear when the 
resistive element approaches 14 wavelength; 
the 7 in. original stack would resonate at 
approximately 375 MHz more or less, and 
this resonant factor is of predominant im- 
portance in the design of any rf load. 

For one thing, when the rf path ap- 
proaches V4 wavelength, research work done 
in our laboratory showed that very strange 
things occujred, and the meter became 
erratic to say the least. As there was no 
literature available which described such 
things, they had to be learned by experi- 
mentation. It was also determined that an 
erratic area appeared with certain lengths of 
the RG-S/U connecting cable used to con- 
nect the meter to the transmitter. As long as 
the cable was kept under Va wavelength, no 
erratic conditions occurred, but when it 
approached H wavelength, unreliable opera- 
tion resulted. Therefore the length of the 
connecting cable (with regard to the fre- 
quencies to be measured) is critical to some 
degree. 

It therefore becomes mandatory that 
above 300 MHz the cable length should not 
be greater than about 4 in. 

The meter described here is capable of 
dissipating 25W for up to 30 seconds with- 
out undue heating or change of resistance 



values of the discs, and up to SOW for not 
more than 5 seconds of intermittent use. 
This is entirely adequate for tuneup pro- 
cedures of a transmitter in the 300 to 600 
MHz range, as most of these transmitters in 
the present state of the art have power 
limitations of 25 W or less. 

The picture shows the simple, straight- 
forward, short lead construction employed. 
Note how close the resistance stack is 
mounted to the input connector (actually, 
right on it). The ground lead is less than 1/8 
in, long, and the high rf lead is actually but 
3/8 in, long. A 1N38 diode was found to 
have a more linear, higher frequency range 
than the 1N34 diodes originally used, but 
the 1N34 can be used if that is all that is 
available, and it will work (however the 
forward to back ratio of the 1N38 is quite 
superior to that of the 1N34). 



INPUT 



PCTQVEfi i/r 




SCR 

10 pF 




Fig, J. Circuit schematic. 



The parts fist which follows Is specifically made 
flexible to adjust to the type (sensitivity I of the 
meter which the constructor chooses to use, within 
the ranges specified in the charts: 
5-10n composition resistor discs 
l_2f2 composition resistor disc 
2 takeoff tap washer/ con nee tors (see diagram) 
1 IN 34 or 1N38 diode {or similar) 
1 flF mylar capacitor 
1.025 JLtF mylar capacitor 
1 R sub s (series) resistor (see table) 
1 R sub m (nrteter parallel) resistor (see table) 
1 100 /IF capacitor (mica preferred) (meter shunt) 
1 meter (constructor's preference) 
1 meter and instrument enclosure (Bud or similar) 
1 S0239 chassis connector 

4 #6 X 1/4" flat or filister head brass NP machine 
screws, 32 TPI 

Solder and ^2 copper connecting wire as re- 
quired; (about 4" wilt do) 



38 



73 MAGAZINE 



t 




J 



* 



r 



I 



Create a vast improvement in your two meter 

performance! Get the advantage of 6 db gain 

transmitting — 6 db gain receiving. 

Both are yours in the Hustler Model G6-144, 

the antenna designed to establish 

who is w/ho on two meters. 



he" 







meters 




Ihe 

gam collnear 

MODEL G6-144 . . . S42.95 




ELECTRICAL: 

• 6 db gain over 1/4 wave ground 
plane 

• Omnidirectional radiation pat- 
tern 

• 50 ohm feed impedance 

• Field adjustable 

• SWR at resonance — typically 

1-1 ;1 

• 6 MHz bandwidth for L5:l or 
better SWR 

• Power rating— 250 watts FM 



MECHANICAL: 

• Radiator: 133"xr — %"-%'' OD 
high strengtn aluminum tubing 

• Radials: Four— 21" x%" dia. alu- 
minum rod 

• SO-239 coax connector 

• Wind load— 23 lbs. at 100 mph 

• Wind survival— 100 mph 

• Mounting — cast aluminum 
flange accepts 1" American 
standard pipe thread 

• Shipping Weight; 4.54 lbs. 



50'' BO* 



90* SCy 70" &0* 50* 40" 



VERTJCAL 
RADIATiON 

PATTERN 



20* 





NEW-TRONICS CORP. 

16800 COMMERCE PARK DRIVE 
BROOK PARK. OHIO 44142 

The G6-144, plus Super Gain two meter 
mobiles and the ''Buck Buster/' are 

available from all distributors 
who recognize the best I 



JU^E 1973 



^^ ^^ 



METER 
CQHHtClDR 



fifUSS WASHER 




HIGH Rf CCWNECTION 
GAOUN0 QQHHECT\Oh 
5RASS WASHER 
l/a*'Tbd IftASS ROD 



MUT 



1-2 OHH DI5C 



POtYSTTRENE 
SLCEVC 



POLYSTYRENE ^PWEM/ 
SPACER/ WASHER 

9-10 OHM OlSCS 




J/4" + 
WASHER/ COtTNECTORS -BRASS OCttO* SHIH STOCK 

Fig. 2. Split view drawing of the resistor stack as- 
tern biy. 



Several bugs were encountered in the 
design of this new meter. It was found that 
there appeared a time-constant effect when 
an attempt was made to design a dual-range 
meter (higli and low power). This appeared 
only when R sub m and R sub s were made 
approximately equal in value. As mentioned 
previously, there is no Uterature available to 
act as a guideline in design such as this. 
However, it was found that the reaction 
mentioned was taking place in the dual-range 
switch which was being used, so the dual- 
range feature was discarded, and a single- 
range meter was the only solution. 

Because the constructor may have various 
usable old meters of different types around 
the shack which may be used, Table I is 
presented showing the values of resistors 
which can be used with various types of 
meters* The values are not strictly arbitrary. 
Nearby values, and a little cut-and-try will 
result in a meter with a range of power 
output suitable to the constructor, with a 
minimum of cost. 

It should perhaps be mentioned — and 
may be of interest to some - that this meter 
can be used in pulsed transmissions and it 
will n^ad; but caution: The reading will be 
false, and will have to be interpolated against 
the time on/ time off shape of the pulse; 
and it will not be completely linear, at that. 

Over 1 ,000 sets of elements described in 
the original meter were dispensed to con- 
structors from the southern tip of Africa, to 



Alaska, England, Spain, China, Siam, and 
just about afl states and possessions: probab- 
ly because they could be mailed first-class 
postage; and only two builders had any 
difficulties, which eventually were straight- 
ened out. 

In the redesign of the meter^ new type 
discs were secured which are actually larger 
than the 1 in. disc diameter of those shown 
in the photograph. Five 1012 discs, and one 
2n disc are used in the "stack"' to make up 
exactly 5212 rf resistive impedance. 

The metering/ rectifier circuit is taken off 
at a tap between the 2Q disc and ground. 
This results in just about the lowest practical 
impedance which can be used to feed the 
rectifier/meter circuit. The meter shown in 
the photograph was designed to read 20W 
full scale; it has been used by me for a 
number of years to test the output of 2-way 
transmitters (mobile) used in taxi and police 
cars which have maximum power output of 
20W. The original meter is good for up to 
lOOW up to 300 MHz and has been used by 
me to check fixed-station transmitters used 
in 2-way work for the past 20 years — and it 
is St 01 in use. 

A caution about parts: Use only the best 
quality components — such as a 1,000V 
mica capacitor across the meter, and if 
possible, a Mylar type capacitor as the 
rectifier shunt (0,25 ^F/60-V type). The 
coupUng capacitor, which should be a 5 
pF/1000 for frequency range up to 600 
MHz must of necessity be of the deposited 
silver-on-ceramic type, as that is about the 
only type available in this range. 

The only other caution is with regard to 
the construction of the stack itself. The discs 
have a V4 in. hole through the center of each. 



TYPICAL VOLTAGE GRADIENT VALUES 

ACROSS STACK OF DISCS WITH 

FIXED RF INPUT** 

Top of stack ( input rf termi nat) 6 Volts rf 

Between 1 st and 2nd discs 5.2 

Between 2nd and 3rd discs 4.1 

Between 3rd and 4th discs 3,0 

Between 4th and 5th discs 2,5 

Between 5th and 6th diss (Tap Point) 2.1 
**From this table, note the slightly capacitive 
effect of the discs, which accounts for the non- 
linearity of the rf voitages across the same values of 
resistances — 1012 in each case except the last, 
which is 2^ 



40 



73 MAGAZINE 





Get total 146-148 MHz coverage 
without buying a crystal ! 



fl 



The modified Clegg FM 27B transceiver 
now covers the entire range of 146-148 
MHz . . . and needs NO additional crys- 
tals. It's the only 2 meter rig available 
now with built-in total coverage that 
also offers greater than 25 watts output 
power, uses 10 IC devices, and has 
Teflon* wiring throughout. Not a single 
bi-polar device is in the RF path in 
transmitter or receiver . . . ensuring 
greater reliability. Accessory power 
supply and sub-audible tone on transmit 
are available too. At home or in your 
car, the FM 27B gives you the ultimate 
in total 2 meter performance. See your 
Clegg Dealer NOW or write or phone 
us today for detailed data sheet on our 
2 meter leader. 

..1 1 "» (0 *f.- 

tMnMAflOHMl 



CHECK THESE SPECIFICATIONS 

GENERAL 
POWER REQUIREMENTS: 12 to 14 VOC 

Current Consumption at 13.5 VDC: 

Receive: 4 amps squelched, 1.2 amps unsquelched. 

Transmit 6 amps max. 
DIMENSIONS: 7H' x 3V4' x9Vl ' deep; 4 lbs. net 

weight. RECEIVER 

TUNING RANGE: 146.00 to 148.00 MHz, continu- 
ously tuneable witti reset capability of approx. 

1 KHz to any frequency in range. 
SENSITIVITY: .35 fiv max, lor 20 db quieting; .1 ^v 

for reliable squelch action. 
SELECTIVITY: 11 KHz 3t3 db: Lessttian 30 KHz at 

70 db. Adjacent (30 KHz spaced) channel rejection 

more than 70 db. 
AUDIO OUTPUT: 2.0 watts (min.) at less than 10% 

THD into internal or external ohm speaker. 

TRANSMITTER 
TUNING RANGE AND CONTROLS: Same as 

RECEIVER. 
POWER OUTPUT: 25 watts IVIin. into 50 ohm load. 

PA transistor protected for infinite VSWR. 
MODULATION: tnternally adjustable up to 10 KHz 

deviation and up to 12 db peak clipping. 



Amateur Net $479.95 




i%e£ 



♦DtrPonf irademark 



DIVISION 



^9§ro**. ' '"S* 



3050 Hempland Road, Lancaster, PannsyJvania 17601 
Tel. (717) 299-3671 Telex: 84-8438 



JUNE 1973 



41 



mmt 






T 







Only STANDARD 
sells more STANDARDS 
than ERICKSON! 

HANDHELD 

STANDARD SRC- 146- A 

5 Channels - .94/.94 and .34/.94 supplied 
.3;jV receiver • 2-'-W transmitter - PL available 
Compact - 8"h X 3 "w X t'/rd 
Full line of optional accessories includes external 

speaker-mike - desktop charger ~ "stubby" an* 

tenna - and more! 
Available NOW! - Only $289.00 




TEMPO 

CLT46 




12 Channels On iw «697Q nn 

13 Watt xmtr - .5^ rcvr ""'V $279.00 

Xtals for 146.94 MHz supplied 
Meter for Power Out, Signal 
Strength, and Discriminator 
Size: 2.36" X 7.66" 



ALL PURPOSE 

STANDARD 826MA 

12 chennels (94/94, 34/94', 16/76, 

52/52 supplied). 
10 Watt output 
PL available 
Hot MOSFET receiver, 

helical resonators Only $369.00 



NEWl TEMPO fW« 



8 Channels 

(146.S4 supplied) 

2 W. out 

.5/iV rcvr 

Sig. Level/Bat. Mtr. 

Size: 8.5" X 2.9" X 2 

Weight: 1.7lbs 

Only $189.00 



ff 





TEMPO SOLID STATE POWER AMPS 



Solid 
State 

Micro- 
Strip 

Circuit 



MODEL 


POWER tifi/oiitj 


PRICE ' 


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502 


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130.00 


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low 85+ W 


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220.00 


1002 38 1 


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235-00 



Ready-to-go, 

Cables supplied 

all U.S. made 

In stock. Shipped same 
day UPS ppd. for Cash- 
ier's Check Of M.O. 



And many more from SBE/Clegg/Gladding/Kenwood/Tempo/Antenna Specialists/Larsen 




Make ERICKSON your headquarters for all your FM needs . . 
SBHti ^%L FOR COMPLfTE SHClffCATIOHS 

RICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

4653 N. Ravenswood Ave., Chicago, III 60640 (312) 334-3200 



42 



73 MAGAZINE 



A 1/8 in, or No, 10/32 threaded brass rod is 
suitable for the center (ground) conductor. 
This is insulated from the stack by a length 
of 1/8 in. inside diameter polystyrene sleeve, 
which is just less than V^ in. outside di- 
ameter, and fits nicely inside the inside bore 
of the discs. At the ground end (far end of 
the stack from the rf input) next to the 
tapped disc, no insulating washer is used. A 
brass or copper washer can be used, and then 
the ground nut, which should be brass or 
brass nickel-plated of the Castle type. 

The high rf end of the stack consists of 
the takeoff copper washer/strap, which is to 
be connected to the hot terminal of the 
chassis connector, and then an insulating 
polystyrene washer at least 1/8"' thick, then 
the ground washer/strap connector, a brass 
washer, and then a brass nut. Dimensions are 
given for the washer/connectors in the event 
the constructor wishes to make his own, if 
nothing suitable is available; also a split-view 
drawing of the stack is given herewith so the 
constructor will make no error in assembly. 
The ground rod (brass) actually extends 
through the center of the stack. 

Any suitable meter case (such as bud) can 
be used. With all materials available, this 
meter can be constructed in much less than 
1 hour. There are but 5 holes to drill. 
Position the input chassis connector at the 
side of the case (left side seems more 
convenient); drill the center hole; position 
the connector^ and mark and driU the 4 
small retaining-screw holes (#6/32-1/4" 



METER USED 

FULL SCALE 

READING Rsubs 

1 mA 4,000 

ZERO 

7.5 mA 1,000 

12.0 mA 2,000 

200 mA 5,000 

(with shunt 

removed) 2,500 

About 500 MA 



WATTS 

FULL SCALE 
Rsubm READING 
180 400* 

180 10 

1 ,000 30 

1 ,000 -30- 

(at 3/4 scale) 
1 80 -30- 

(at 1/2 scale) 
1 80 '30* 



(at 1/4 scale) 

♦ The vatue for 400 watts fufi scate reading is 
given; however, 400 watts cannot be appfied to the 
meter described herein. 

*• Resistors near the values given may be 
used — cut and try — as the internal resistances of 
various meters do vary from published figures. The 
values given herewith are guidelines. 



brass nickel-platcd screws and nuts were 

used). One nut retains the ground connector 

which is soldered to the stack ground strap. 

There are only 11 soldered connections. 
As a matter of information, the curious 

constructor might like to know what the 
voltage gradient would be between the 6 
discs used in this meter, A General Radio rf 
VTVM was used to determine the voltages 
shown in the table herewith. Note from 
these readings that the very slight capacitive 
effect of the discs is apparent; which ac- 
counts for the non-linearity of voltages 
appearing across like 1 OQ resistor discs, 

Testing the Meter 

Now that you have constructed the 
meter, how about testing it just to convince 
yourself it is a good one? The best test of 
any such output meter is to make up a test 
line with a RG-S/U "T* fitting in the center 
of the line. Practically, two short lengths of 
cable may be made up, each 1 /8 wavelength 
or less in length, and a screw type RG-8/U 
"T" fitting inserted. Then, cut yourself a 
piece of RG-8/U cable exactly 1/4 wave- 
length long at the frequency of the 
transmitter you are using. Insert this open- 
ended piece of cable into the "T" fitting, 
and connect the meter and the transmitter. 
Turn on the transmitter. The meter will read 
zero — that is, if everything has been cut 
exactly, or near zero if there has been a 
slight error Now, with the transmitter off, 
short out the end of the stub of cable 
inserted into the *T" fitting. Turn on the 
transmitter and the meter should read exact- 
ly as it does with the stub completely 
removed from the *'T' fitting (meter con- 
nected directly to transmitter). 

To obviate too much computation on the 
part of the reader, it might be stated that the 
approximate lengths of 1/4 wavelength Une 
in various frequency ranges are as follows: 
I 50 MHz range — approx, 17^2" 
300 MHz range — approx. 8%" 
600 MHz range — approx, 4-3/8" 

These figures are given as guidelines only, 
rf your actual measurements with exact 
transmitter frequencies compute out too far 
away from these figures, you will know you 
have an error in computation. 

- ■ -K2EE 



JUNE 1973 



43 



Heaihkir 2-Meter FM gear is herel 



riBi 




NEW Heathkit 

2-Meter 

FM Transceiver 

17995 



% 



HW-202 ^howfi above 
wtUi Tone Burst 
Encoder Instaliacf, 



« Alt solid-state design * Can be com- 
pleieiy aligned without instruments • 36- 
channei capability — independent push- 
button selection of 6 transmit and 6 re- 
ceive crystals • iO-Watts Minimum Out- 
put-designed to operate into even an 
infinite VSWR witiiout failure • Optional 
Tone Burst Encoder — mounts inside, 
gives front-panel selection of four pre- 
settable tones 

The Heathkit HW'-202 compares with the best wired 
amateur 2M/FM rigs. Plus it has: 36-channel 
capability via independent selection of 6 transmit 
and 6 receive crystals. Solid-state circuitry with 
complete buift-in alignment procedures using only 
the manual and the front-panel meter allow opera- 
tion over a 1 MHz segment from 143.9 to 148,3 
MHz. Removable front-panef bezel permits instal- 
lation of the new Heathkit HWA-202-2 Tone Burst 
Encoder- 

10-15 watts transmission into an infinite VSWR — 
indefinitely, with no failure! The HW-202 needs no 
automatic shut-down — it continues to generate a 

signal regardless of antenna condition. Transmit- 
ter deviation is fully adjustable from to 7,5 kHz. 
with irtstantaneous deviation limiting. Harmonic 
output is greater than ^45 dB from carrier. The 
push-to*talk ceramic microphone supplied has an 
audio response tailored to the HW-202. 

Excellent reception — 0.5 uV or less produces 12 
dB Sinad, or 15 dB quieting. Output at the built-in 
speaker is typically 2 watts at less than 3% total 
harmonic distortion- The receiver circuitry utilizes 
diode-protected dual-gate MOSFETS in the front 
end; an IC IF that completely limits with less than 
a 10 uV signal; dual conversion, 10.7 MHz and 455 
kHz via a 4-pole monolithic 10J MHz crystal filter. 
Image response is —55 dB or better. Spurious re- 
sponse is —75 dB or better. 



The Heathkit HW-202 comes with two crystals used 
in initial set-up and alignment, give you simplex 
operation on 146:94. Kit includes microphone, 
quick-connecting cabfe for 12-volt hook-up, heavy 
duty alligator clips for use with a temporary bat- 
tery, antenna coax jack, gimbai bracket, and mo- 
bile mount that lets you remove the radio from the 
car by unscrewing two thumbscrews. The HWA- 
202-2 Tone Burst Encoder provides four preset- 
table pushbuttons for instant repeater access. 
Fixed station operation is as easy as adding the 
HWA-202-1 AC Power Supply. The HA-202 2-Meter 
Amplifier puts out 40 watts for 10 watts in, and 
externally it's a perfect mate for your HW-202. 

Kit HW-202, 11 lbs., mailable .179-95* 

Kit HWA-202-2, Tone Burst Encoder, 1 lb. . .24-95* 
Kit HWA-202-1, AC Power Supply, 7 lbs. . .29,95* 



Kit HWA-202-3, Mobile 2-Meter 

Kit HWA-202-4, Fixed Station 2-Meter 
Antenna, 4 lbs 



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HW-202 SPECIFICATIOHS - RECEIVER ^ Sensitivitjr 12 dB SIMAO* 
(or 15 dS of quiet ing] at .S^v or less, SqueJ€h ttireshold: 3 ^y or 
less. Audio output: 2 W at less than 10% total harmonic distor- 
tion (THO). Operatiiii frequency stability: Better than rt.00l5%, 
Image rejection: Greater than 55 dB. Spurious rejection: Greater 
than 60 dB, IF rejection: Greater than 75 dB- First IF frequency: 
10.7 MHz :^2 kHz. Second IF frequency; 455 kHz (adjustable). 
Receiver bandwidth: 22 kHz nominaL De-emphasfs: -6 dB per 
octave from 300 to 3000 Hi nominaL Modulation acceptance; 7.5 
kHz minimum. TRANSMITTER — Fower output: 10 ^atts mfnimum. 
Spurious output: Below —45 dB from carrier, Stahiflty: Better 
than ±0015%. Oscillator frequency: 6 MHi» approximately, Mul- 
tiplier factor; X 24. Motlutation: Phase, adjustable 0-7.5 kHz, 
with instantaneous limiting. Duty cycle; 100% with oo VSWR. 
High VSWR shutdown: Mone. GENERAL - Speaker impedance: 4 
ohms. Operating frequency range: 143.9 to 148.3 MHz. Current 
consumption: Receiver (squelched): Less than 200 mA. Transmit- 
ten Less than 2.2 amperes. Operating temperature range: —10° 
to 122^ F (-30° to + SO'^ G). Operatini voltage range: 12,6 to 
16,0 VOC (13.8 VDC nominaJ). Oimensions: 2^4" H x SV4'' W x 

*SINAD- Sign3l + noise -^ distortion 

Noise + distortion 



...and here! 

NEW Heathkit 

2-Meter Amplifier for cleaner 

FM copy on the fringe... 



6995 



40 watts nominal out foF 10 watts in — 

requires only 12 VDC supply. 

Fully ai/fomafic operation — with any 
S-meter exciter delivering 5-15 watts drive. 

Solid-state design — all components 
mount on single board for fast, 
easy assembly. 

If you're regularly working from a fringe area, the 
new Heathkit HA-202 can boost your mobile output 
to 40 watts (nominal), white pulling a meager 7 
amps from your car's 12-volt battery. 

Install it anywhere,. Jn the trunk, under the hood 
or dashboard. Use it with any 2-meter exciter de- 
livering 5-15 watts drive. Features fully automatic 
operation. An internal relay automatically switches 
the antenna from transmit to receiver mode when 
you release the mike button. 

All solld*state design features rugged, emitter- 
ballasted transistors, combined with a highly effi- 
cient heat sink, permitting high VSWR loads. Tuned 
input-output circuits offer low spurious output 
to cover the 1,5 MHz segment of the 2-meter bsnd 
without periodic readjustment. All components 
mount on a single printed circuit board for easy, 




4-hour assembly. Manual shows exact alignment 
procedures using either a VOM or VTVM. And in- 
stallation is just as simple. 

Kit includes transceiver connecting cabte, antenna 
connector. Operates from any 12 VDC system — 
additional power supplies are not required. Add 
HA'-202 power to your mobile 2- meter rig, and 
boom out of the fringe. Kit HA-202, 4 lbs. 

lfA'202 SF^ECrriCATfONS - Frequency range; 143-149 MHr. Power 
output: 20W @ 5 W in, 30W @ 7.5W in, 40W @ 10 W in, 50W 
© 15 W in. Power input (rf drive): 5 to 15W. Input/output im- 
pedance: 50 ohms, nomfnar. tnput VSWfi: L5:l max. Load VSWR; 
3:1 max. Power supply re«|uirements: 12 to IS VDC, 7 amps max 
Operating temperature range: -30^ F. to +140=^ F. Dimensions: 
3" H X 4V4" W X 5V2" D. 




herel 



VHF Wattmeter/SWR Bridge . , . 29-95* 



Perfect tune-up tool for your 2-meter gear. Tests transmitter output in 
power ranges of 1 to 25 watts and 10 to 250 watts ^10% of full scale. 
50 ohm nominal impedance permits placement in transmission line 
permanently with little or no loss. Built-in SWR bridge for tuning 2- 
meter antenna for proper match^ has iess than 10-watt sensitivity, 
KitHM-2102, 4lbs. 

HM-2102 SPECIFICATIONS - Frequency range: 50 MHz to 160 MHi. Wattmeter accuracy: 

±10% of full-scale reading,* Power capability: To 250 W. SWR sensitivity: less than 10 
W. Impedance: 50 ohms nominal. SWR tiridger Continuous to 250 W. Connectors: UHF 
type SO-239. Dimensions: 5V4" W, 5K«" H and 6V2" D, assen^bled as one unit 
'Using a 50 Q nonjnduct^ve load. 



See them at your Heathkit Electronic Center 



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■■ 




As a guide to any amateur about to 
license a repeater, here is the latest 
poop from the FCC, with sample 
diagrams, etc. Appended is a section 
on antennas for repeaters, with a 
current list of commercially available 
FCC-approved antennas. 

The opening section is a sample 
'Technical Explanation of the Opera- 
tion of The Control Link/' Be sure 
your name, address and phone num- 
ber are on each statement or diagram 
you submit. 



TECHNICAL EXPLANATION 

OF THE OPERATION OF 

THE CONTROL LINK 

{refer to 
the functional block diagram) 

1, Description — A wire control link is 
used between the control point and 
the remotely controlled station. It is 
used for control and communication 
purposes. The wire line consists of a 
dedicated twisted pair, 1 mile fong, 
strung on poles. Command tone sig- 
nats are transmitted over the wire line 



from the control point by the control 
operator to the remotely controlled 
station where they activate the desired 
control function. 

2. Protection against unauthorized 
operation through physical access to 
the remotely controlled station ^ The 

remotely controlled station transmit- 
ter and control equipnwnt will be 
housed in a locked building. Only 
other licensed amateur radio operators 
authorized by the station licensee will 
have keys to the building. Based upon 




MOWfTOH 
RECEIVER 




COMMAND 

TONE 

ENCODER 



V 



FUNCTIONAL BLOCK DIAGRAM 
(Control Link) 

Applicant's Name 
Address 
Telephone Number 



TERMIMAL 



DEDICATED LINES 



OOlVTROt 
OPERATOR 




MALFUm:TlO>N 
IMDfCATQR 




1MILE 



MALFUNCTICm 
DETECTOR 



TERMINAL 



MALFUNCTION 
DETECTOR 





COMMAND 

TONE 

DECODER 
















' 


f 






LfcR 




COffTROi 



CONTFlOL POJNT 

♦CONTROL FUNCTIONS 

1. Remotely controlled station in service 

2. Remotely controlled station out of service 
3» Etc. 

4, Etc. 

5, Etc, 

6, Etc. 





m 



OSNTROL LINES 



REMOTELY CONTftOLLED 
STATION SJTE 



fig. I. Sample Functions! Block Diagram, referred lo in the sample explanation Mbove. 



46 



73 MAGAZINE 



my experfence and knowledge of local 
con di lions, I believe these precautions 
are adequate to prevent operation of 
the remotely controlled station by 
unauthorized persons through physi- 
cal access to the equipment In the 
event unauthorized emissions do oc- 
cur, station operation will be suspen- 
ded until such time as adequate pro- 
tection is incorporated. 

3. Protection against unauthorized 
operation through activation of the 
remotely controlled station through 
the control link - The command tone 
encoder and command tone decoder 
use a system of five sequential audio 
tones for each command. The tone 
frequencies and sequences are treated 
as privileged information and are not 
divulged to other than control opera- 
tors authorized by the station licen- 
see. The tones and sequence codes are 
changed periodically. Based upon my 
experience and knowledge of local 
conditions, I believe these precautions 
are adequate to prevent operation of 
the remotely controlled station by 
unauthorized persons through the 
control link. In the event unauthor- 
ized emissions do occur, station opera- 
tion will be suspended until such time 
as adequate protection is incor- 
porated. 

4* Malfunction shut down - A mal- 
function detector monitors for the 
presence of a continuity current on 
the wire line at the control point and 
at the remotely controlled station. 
When an abnormal continuity current 
is detected, the malfunction indicator 
warns the control operator; If the 
abnormal continuity current persists 
for a minimum of 3 minutes, the 
remotely controlled station is auto- 
matically taken from service by the 
controller. The remotely controlled 
station can only be returned to service 
by the control operator through the 
control link. 

5, Monitoring provisions — A monitor 
receiver tuned to the transmitting 
frequency of the remotely controlled 
station is located at the control point. 
Due to the proximity of the control 
point to the remotely controlled sta- 
tion, the control operator can monitor 
the transmitted signal of the remotely 
controlled station for proper opera- 
tion, and can monitor for the presence 
of other signals the transmitted signal 
could interfere with. 

MONITORING OF A 
REPEATER STATION 

Section 97.11 Kb) requires that the 
transmitting and receiving frequencies 
utilized by a repeater station be con- 
tinuously monitored by a control 
operator fc/o) immediately prior to, 
and during, periods of operation. For 
a station having the control point 
located at the station, the c/o can 



monitor the repeater input receiver 
prior to activating the repeater trans- 
mitter in order to check for the 
presence of signals not intended for 
retransmission. He could, either con- 
currently or sequentially, also monitor 
the transmitting frequency for the 
presence of other signals from stations 
the repeater station could cause inter- 
ference to. 

In the case of remotely controlled 
repeater stations, additional provisions 
wtII have to be incorporated when the 
control point is sufficiently far re- 
moved from the repeater station site, 
in order to facilitate proper monitor- 
ing. Either a wireline or a point-to- 
point radio link using an auxiliary link 
station at the repeater site to the 
control point may be required. 
Another method uses a receiver at the 
repeater station, tuned to the trans- 
mitting frequency for activating a 
lock-out circuit in the presence of 
another signal on the same frequency. 
In areas where there is normally no 
other signal on the repeater input 
frequency, the control operator can 
momentarily activate the repeater sta- 
tion and monitor the output for the 
presence, or absence, of signals not 
intended for retransmission by that 
repeater station. In areas where the 
presence of such signals is a common 
occurrence, such as where there is 
more than one repeater station using 
the same input frequency, it is neces- 
sary to employ a system of access 
signals to insure that such signats are 
not retransmitted. 



SYSTEM NETWORK DIAGRAM 
Definition — A System Network Dia- 
gram shows each station and its re- 
lationship to other stations in a net- 
work of stations, and to their control 
point(s). 




■ «■ OMarDllltCTHQIUIL 




FlAPlOn|UQT£LY 
CaNTHOLLEP 




IJ* riin-f CI ICW*L ANTENN* 
DfllEKTLD lOttARD CONTROL 
KslNt. IDWATT^flff, 



4U)ilLIA|l|V LiftfK BTATION 
ItiUiOHEHDTlLV 




Requirements — When application is 

made for a station having one or more 
associated stations, i.e. control station 
and/or auxiliary link station, a System 
Network Diagram must also be sub- 
mitted. Control stations and auxiliary 
link stations may not be used to 
communicate with any other station 
than those shown on the System 
Network Diagram. A copy of the 
System Network Diagram on file with 
the Federal Communications Commis- 
sion, Washington, DC, must be re- 
tained at each control point for a 
remotely controlled station. 
The diagram must be in the form of 
an outline map, and does not have to 
be drawn to scale (see typical ex- 
ample). The relative location of every 
station and control point in the sys- 
tem network must be indicated by 
showing the approximate distance be* 
tween stations. 

Stations — Every station in the system 
network must be shown by a separate 
block, even if there is more than one 
station at a single location. Label each 
station as appropriate, i.e. repeater 
station, control station, etc. Also, 
there must be an indication for each 
stdtion whether directly controlled, 
wire remotely controlled, or radio 
remotely controlled. Every control 
point for each station must be indi- 
cated. 

Antennas — The frequency band, ef- 
fective radiated power, and char- 
acteristics of the transmitting antenna, 
i.e* omnidirectional or directional 
general orientation if directional, and 
relative gain over a half-wave dipole 
must be indicated for each repeater 
station, control station, and auxiliary 
link station. 

Format — The System Network Dia- 
gram should be prepared and submit- 
ted on standard 8% x 11 inch size 



SYSTEM NETWORK DIAGRAM 



Appltcartf 1 Name 
Address 
TelQfihom^ (SJ umber 



LOCATJOIM. BOTH STATIONS: 









CHKcnv 
ttmnmxm 



LOCATION; . 

CONTROL POINT FOR: CONTROL STATtOM 

AUXILIARY LINK 
REPEATER STATION 



Fig. 2. Sample System Network Diagram fsee wxt above). 



JUNE 1973 



47 



paper. It should bear a heading identi- 
fying it as the System Network Dia- 
gram, and contain the applicant's 
name, address, and telephone number 
where the applicant can be reached in 
case clarification ts required. 

ANTENNAS USED BY 
REPEATER STATIONS 

1. Rule reference — Section 
97,41(f}(6l states that the application 
shaN include 

''The horifomal and vertical radiation pat- 
terns of the transmittrng anienna as in- 
stalled, with reference to True North (for 
horizontal pattern onlyl' expressed as re- 
lative ftetd strength {voltage) or in dectbels, 
drawn ^upon polar coordinate graph paper, 
and method of defer mi nation of the pat- 
terns/' 

2. The term "as installed" in (1 ) above 
does not mean that measurements (if 
required - sae betow) nrtust be made 
on the antenna \r\ its normal operating 
position. It means that the measure- 
ments should be made with the anten- 
na mounted in approximately the 
same position with reference to a 
supporting structure reasonably simi- 
lar to that used tn the intended 
location. If that is impossible (such as 
when an antenna would be mounted 
on a broadcast tower with a 12 foot 
cross section) a statement should be 
made to explain why it coufd not be 
done. The intent is to obtain pattern 
results which are reasonably approxh 
mate to those that wiif obtain when 
the antenna is mounted in its final 
position, 

3. When proposing use of a haffwave 
dipole, it will be satisfactory to indi- 
cate that the gain is zero dBd (dB with 
reference to a dipole), and the hori- 
zontal and vertical patterns to be 
supplied, commonly contained in re- 
cognized amateur handbooks, will be 
accepted without computations or 
measurements, 

4* When proposing other than a half- 
wave dipoie, and the antenna is not 
commercially manufactured, hori- 
lontaf and vertica/ pattern measure- 
ments should be made. In determining 
the patterns a total of 24 measure- 
mem points per pattern, (6 per quad- 
rant} will be satisfactory to determine 
the pattern shape. The test description 
should include a block diagram of the 
lest set-up, brief explanation of the 
techniques used, together with in- 
formation concerning the test equip- 
ment. Gain in the main lobe of the 
horizontal pattern may be determined 
either by computation, measurement, 
or a combination of both, expressed 
in dBd, 

5. When proposing use of a com- 
mercia/ty maaufacrured antenna; 
(a) If the antenna manufacturer has 
submitted the antenna data to the 



Amateur and Citizens Division, FCC, 
and it has been approved, all Che 
applicant needs to do is specify the 
manufacturer^ type or modef number 
of the antenna and the manufacturer's 
specified gain figurefs} in dBd. If you 
do not know whether the antenna has 
been approved, consult your manufac- 
turer. Do not submit patterns from 
the manufacturer's catalog for ap- 
proiraf 

(b) If a commerctally manufactured 
antenna has not be«n submitted or 
approved by the Amateur and Citizens 
Division, FCC, and you wish to use it, 
proceed as in item 4, or refer it to the 
manufacturer for resolution of the 
data, 

6. Antenna showing for use in con- 
trai and auxiliary circuits: 
Reference is made to the memoran- 
dum associated with the Report and 

Order, Docket 18803, numbered para- 
graph 15, last sentence which reads: 
'V. . . The operation of a control station or 
an auxiliary link station which does not uw 
directional antennas in conjunction with low 
transmitter power to minimize the possi- 
bility of harmful interference is not con* 
sidered good amateur practice, and will be 
carefully evaluated by the Commission if 
proposed." 

It is not sufficient to mereiy state 
the applicant will conform to Section 
97.67(b) regarding use of minimum 
power to accomplish the purpose of 
the control of auxiliary link. The 
showing should indicate the link or 
control transmitter input power, tine 
loss in dB, type of directional antenna 
to be used (dish, yagi, etc.}, the 
approximate gain in dBd in the main 
lobe of the antenna, and a brief 
statement explaining the reasoning be- 
hind the power value proposed to 
comply with Section 97.67(b), 

7. Genera/ information of interest 
concerning an tennas: 

(a) All references to antenna gain 
should be referred to a half-wave 
dipole and expressed in "dBd/' Some 



manufacturers advertise antenna gain 
referred to an isotropic antenna "dBi" 
which is roughly 2.2 dB greater than 
when referred to a ha! f- wave dipole. 
Someiimes this is not made clear. 
(b> In rough, mountainous terrain 
where reflections and shielding may 
be a problem, it may be advantageous 
to utilize low antenna gain and higher 
transmitter power. Another technique 
which may be used to improve "fill- 
in" is circular polarization, where the 
radiated field may be considered com- 
posed of both horizontal and vertical 
components, produced by particular 
antenna configurations, 
(ct For vertically polarized omni- 
directional operation, typical antennas 
with substantial povh/er gains may con- 
sist of phased elements (usually di- 
poles of some kind), spaced one wave- 
length apart in the vertical plane. 
Typical power gains m dBd of such 
arrays using vertical polarization, are 
as follows; 

Number of Power Gain 

stacked Elements dBd 

2 2.9 

3 4.9 

4 6.2 

5 7.3 

6 8,0 

7 8.8 

8 9.3 
10 10.4 
12 1h2 

(d) For the information of amateurs 
who wish to become informed about 
the techniques of antenna measure- 
ment in the commercial field, refer- 
ence is made to a pubHcation of the 
Electronic Industries Association, 
2001 I (Eye} Street, NW, Washington, 
D.C20006, telephone: 202/6B9-2200, 
entitled, "ElA Standard RS-329, Part 
I, Base or Fixed Station Antennas." 
This publication may be ordered from 
the El A at $2.00 per copy. 
<e) The following antennas have been 
approved for use by amateur repeaters 
as of 13 April 1973. 



Manufacturer 

Phelps Dodge/ 

Communications 

Products 

Cush- Craft Corp, 

All with same 
patterns 8t 
gains. See ^ ^-^ 

Hy-Gain Electronics 
Corp, 

Andrew Corp. 



Type or Model Gain 

220-509 with various 
mounting configurations 5.25 dBd 
144 MHz "Super Station 
Master" 

AR2"Ringo" 



AFM4D 

AFM-44D 

AFM-24D 

362/SJ2S4 
268/725 

161-3 
150B 11 



2.0 dBd in 
horizontal plane 

6.0 dBd* 
9.0 dBd' 
3.9 dBd^ 

5.9 dBd 
5.9 dBd 

2.8 dBd 

5.25 dBd 



1 . Elements spaced around mast. 

2. Forward gain, elements mounted all on one side of tubular mast. 

3. Back side gain with elements mounted as in 2. 



48 



73 MAGAZINE 



Dave Ingram K4TV/J 

Rte, 11, Box 499, Eastwood ViL SON 

Birmingham AL 35210 




SYSTEM FOR 

DIRECT VIEW 

SSTV 




During the past year, I have been work- 
ing on a method of viewing Color 
SSTV pictures directly from a monitor (no 
photography necessary). Although I am still 
developing this system, I feel the informa- 
tion Fve obtained thus far should be shared 
with others throughout the world. Specific 
circuit details have been omitted since they 
would be similar to existing circuits (dc 
amplifiers^ voltage controlled audio oscilla- 
tors, bandpass filters, etc.). Only the actual 
"food for thought" is presented. 

Our present Color Slow Scan system 
consists of converting a color picture into 
red, green and blue analyzed frames and 
transmitting each sequentially. At the receiv- 
ing end, a multi-exposure photograph is 
taken of the monitor screen (as each color 
analyzed frame is presented) through the 
appropriate filters, thus reconstructing an 
equivalent color picture. 

For direct view Color Slow Scan, the 
three color separation pictures, one red, one 
blue and one green picture (previously ob- 



tained from the color picture to be transmit- 
ted) are placed side by side in front of the 
camera, so all three pictures are scanned 
during each frame. This is transmitted, and 
Fig. 1 shows how they would be displayed 
on your monitor. Next, red, blue and green 
filters are placed over the appropriate pic- 
tures to reproduce the three basic color 
images. All we need to do now is to converge 
the three images onto a common viewing 
point. This may be accomplished by several 




CRT FACE 



Fig, 1, The three side by side pictures as they are 
displayed on the screen of a monitor. 



JUNE 1973 



49 



TD VIDEO AMP 




BRIGHTNESS 



^' 



BRIGHTNESS 



£ 



SLUE 



^ 



BRIGHTNESS. 



jT 



i 



BLUE FILTER 



□ 



GREEN v ^ 



\J 




^BP 



RED 



RED FILTER 

DICHRaC 
MIRRORS 



ViEWER 



Fig. 2, Color SSTV photos may be viewed directly 
by using a art for each color and joining the three 
images on a viewing screen via dichroic mirrors. 



methods varying from a simple lens/mirror 
arrangement where you "stack" the two 
outer pictures onto the center picture, to the 
arrangement shown in Fig. 2. In Fig. 2, three 
electrostatically deflected tubes are slaved to 
one monitor, (Taggart, WB8DQT, described 
this procedure in the July, 1972 73 Maga- 
zine, page 93,) Electro magnetically deflected 
tubes could also be used; however, three 
yokes (with either heavy duty or separate 
sweep circuits for each yoke) would be 
required. 

Looking at Fig. 2, a red filter is placed 
over the equivalent pictures on the right 
hand tube^ while cardboard covers the other 
two pictures on the screen* A weak blue 
filter is placed over the center image on the 
center cathode ray tube, while cardboard 
covers the two outer pictures. No filter is 
used on the "green" tube, just cover the 
"red" and ''blue" pictures. The red and 
green pictures now reflect off their associ- 
ated color dichroic mirrors, while the blue 
picture passes through both mirrors and 
blends with the other colors to produce (or 
in this case, reproduce) a full color image at 
the viewer. 

Color dichroic mirrors are unique in the 
fact they reflect only one color (like a red 



frame) wWIe acting like a plain clear glass 
and passing the other colors (like a blue 
frame). Incidentally, I understand Dr, Edwin 
Land's new Polaroid camera uses dichroic 
mirrors in an arrangement somewhat similar 
to the previous description; however, 1 have 
not personally examined one. 

Naturally, proper positioning of all three 
tubes (plus the viewer) with respect to the 
dichroic mirrors is necessary. The brightness 
control on each crt is for balancing the 
individual colors. This briefly describes the 
basic "system.'* 

One drawback of this system is the low 
brightness of the blue picture after placing a 
blue filter in front of the P7s (primarily) 
green persistence. This can be corrected 
somewhat by "dimming*' the red and green 
crt brightness pots. Four second frames also 
help overcome the dim blue picture by 
sweeping twice as often, thus giving a bright- 
er picture to drive through the blue filter. 
The other drawback is small picture size; 
however this can be overcome by either a 
magnifier lens, larger screen crt (12DP7s are 
becoming popular on the surplus market and 
are a direct substitute for a 5FP7) or high 
gain separate sweep circuits for each crt. 
With a separate sweep circuit you could 
enlarge all three pictures, then re-center just 
one of the desired pictures to fill each crt 
screen. 

Some time back, Jim Wilson W4RKS and 
I rigged a P31 phosphor crt to a Slow Scan 
monitor. Although the pictures were held on 
the persistence for only half a frame, the 
blue content was high. This phosphor, plus 4 
second frame s, would be ideal for the blue 
picture. I am stOl awaiting a P26 phosphor 
crt, so 1 can't definitely say what effect a 
blue filter would have on its persistence. 

There are other possibilities, including 
"breaking down" our grey scale frequency 
range into three color ranges (plus guard 
bands). However that's a long discussion I 
will cover in the future. 

I would be quite interested in hearing 
from others on either this or any related 
Slow Scan experimentation and /or develop- 
ment. You may write me direct, or via 73 
Magazine, Any significant accompUshments 
can be described in my SSTV Scene column. 

. . .K4TWJ 



50 



73 MAGAZINE 



Joseph M. Hood K2YAH 

67 Mountain Ash Drive 
Rochester NY 146 IS 




AU TOS W 



CH 



Reception of a 2125 Hz tone through the local FM repeater will 
autotnalivally put your receiver on a specified RTTY channel 



The advent of two meter FM has seen 
the opening of new areas of endeavor 
for the amateur. Repeaters, autopatch, and 
many other innovations are made possible 
by the channelized FM system* This chan- 
nelized system offers some advantages in 
local and regional radio Teletype commum- 
cations. What could be better than a 2 meter 
FM channel for autostart work, local nets, 
traffic, or just plain amateur communica- 
tions? The problem with this is that it 
requires constant monitoring of the Teletype 
channel at the expense of monitoring the 
local repeater or the construction or pur- 
chase of an additional receiver to allow 



simultaneous monitoring of both chan- 
nels -- or does it? In pondering this question^ 
I wondered if there were some way to have 
my cake and eat it, too. That is to say, to be 
able to monitor the local repeater but with 
the capability to switch automatically to the 
local RTTY channel, should a station wish 
to send me a printed message. (Teletype is 
not permitted on the Rochester Repeater, 
WA2UWQ, for obvious reasons of courtesy 
to those stations monitoring or wishing to 
use the repeater.) 

The result of this pondering is the auto- 
switch system. It meets the requirement for 
minimum annoyance to stations using the 



CHAMNEL I 
RECEIVE OSC 



CHAMNEL I 
TRANS 05C 



T 



CHAWNCL Z 
RECEIVE OSC 



1 



CHANMEL3 
RECEfVE OSC 



CHAN1MEL Z 
TWAINS OSC 



OSCILLATOR 
CCHMTROL LINES *- 



REPEATER 



CHAI4I4EL 



CHANNEL S 
TRANS OSC 



RTTY CHAWNEL 



i 



1 



BX OSC VOLTAGE 
FROM T/H RELAY 



CHANNEL 4 
RECEIVE OSC 



ETC 



CHAMNEL 4 
TRAf^S OSC 



I 



"--ETC 



TX OSC VOLTAGE 
FROM T/R RELAY 



RTTY TERWrnAL UNIT 



TO ENABLING 
VOLTAGE FOR BASE 
DRIVE GATING 

TO GROliNO 

FOR EMITTER OR 

CATHODE GATING 



CHANNEL 
SELECTOR 




AUTO SWtTCH CHANNEL 



t UNUSED POSITION - HOT 
CONNECTED TO ANY 
OSCiLL&TOR) 




I 




TO PfllNTER 
I ON /OFF 



LINES ADDED FOR » 
AUTO SWITCH I 



CONTROL 



AUTOSTART 
RELAY tOPOT] 



Fig* 1, Connections for autoswitch. 



JUNE 1973 



51 



■ 



NEW!! 
440MHzPREAMPS 



am 



$29.95 

postpaid 
Model 432PA 



Two itag» KMC Bipolar and MOSFET Pfeinip for DX, FM, ATV A 
Soace Work. Typicatly 3.5 dB NF for excdlent wtik signal 
reception. ?0 d8 Gain. 20 MHi 6^c*wicfth. 12V (te, with metat case, 
postpaid and gpiaiwiteed, M ode I 4 32 PA Only S2S. 95 . 

Super semiTwe Model 432PC - as above but very fciw noi« K60O7 
input ftjge. 1 ,5 to 2.0 dB NF SS9.9S. 



$54.95 

postpaid 
Model432PA 1 



Preamps with all tl>e above teaiures plus ac Power Supply and Die 
Cast Cabinet. 

Model 432PA I t3,5 dB NFl S54.95 
McNlel 432PC-1 (1.5 to 2.0dB NFJ S94.95 



^ 



n 



\!^ 



(aborafories 



Mfr/re for our new camfog of 
VMf'VHf Convenen and Preamps. 

P.O.Box It 2 

Siiccasunna NJ 07876 
201-584 6521 



TONE BURST ENCODER 




New! Eleven 
tones in one 
encoder^ 

LC oscMlator. 
Stable; no RC 
c i rcu i ts to 
drift. 

No batteries 
needed. 

Full one year 
warranty. 



Now, all the popular tone frequencies in 
one encoder. Panel switch selects 1650. 
1800, 1950. 2000, 2100, 2250, 2400, 
2550, 2700, 2850. 3000 Hz, 

High and low impedance outputs - works 
with all transmitters. Level adjustment 
provided. 

i^second tone burst time also adjustable. 
Continuous tone if needed. 

Free descriptive brochure on request. 

Order direct. Price $37.50 PPD USA (5% 
tax Caltf.) 




repeater, is extremely simple, costs ntxi to 
nothing if your TU has autostart, and it 
works. 

The technicality of autos witch will not 
amaze you and it won't take a BSEE degree 
to understand the circuitry. Autoswitch 
makes use of the autostart feature in the 
terminal unit to automatically switch the 2 
meter FM receiver to the local repeater 
output (in this case 146-88 MHz) when the 
printer is off or switch the receiver to the 
local RTTY channel (in this case 146,70 
MHz) when the printer is on. 

A station with a Teletype message for a 
station equipped with autoswitch merely 
checks in and out of the repeater, caBs the 
station and follows his call with a three or 
four second mark (2125 Hz) tone burst. The 
tone burst causes all autoswitch equipped 
stations to turn on their printers, switch to 
146.70 and wait for 20 to 30 seconds for the 
Teletype signal to appear on 146,70. If the 
signal appears on 146.70 before the 20—30 
second delay time has elapsed the system 
will print the message received. If no Tele- 
type signal appears after 20 to 30 seconds of 
listening on 146,70, the system automati- 
cally turns the printer off and svdtches the 
receiver back to 146.88 to monitor the 
repeater. 

The only other requirement for auto- 
switch is that your FM receiver uses a dc 
oscillator gating technique (either a switch 
to a positive dc voltage or a switch to ground 
to enable the oscillator. Some receivers, like 
the Regency HR-2 series, switch the rf 
excitation to the crystal via a rotary switch* 



REPEATER 
RCV 
XrAL 



RTTY 

CHA^J^fEL 



+ I2VDC 



UNUSED 

UUTO* 
SWITCH 

CHANNEL) 



REGENCY 
CHA^iNEL 
SELECTOR 




AUTOSTART 
RELAT 



*6VDC 

m REGeNCV 



KEEP ALL CONNECTIONS TO 
CRYSTAL LEADS SHORT 



Fig. 2, Autoswitch moditication for Regency HR-Z 



52 



73 MAGAZINE 



PARALLEL C ADJUST 




REPEATER 
FREO 



i if \ 

SERIES |C ADJUST 



^^"Hr^™ 




0+3VDC 
< 5 mA 



-•-ViAf f^^ViA^-* — 



♦ 10 
VDCO- 



O^.ooi 



NX, NO 

\AUT< 
REL 



AUTOSTART 
AY 




OHB SIDE OF CRYSTALS 
MUST BE GROUryD m 
ORIGINAL CIRCUIT 

ALL RESISTORS ARE 

\/Z WATT 



Fig. 3* Diode cryst^J setection. 



This type of switching cannot be used for 
autoswitch, but the addition of a few diodes 
and resistors eliminates that problem^ as will 
be discussed later, 

I use an RF Communications, Ensign !» 
VHF Marine radio which has been converted 
for use in the 2 meter band. The Ensign has 
separate transmit and receive oscillators for 
each channel- The oscillators are gated on by 
applying a 5V dc signal to the base circuit of 
the oscillator. Autoswitch merely requires 
that an unused position on the channel 
selector switch be brought out along with 
connections to the repeater channel and 
RTTY channel positions. The autostart relay 
in the TU then merely selects the repeater if 
the printer is off or the RTTY channel if 
the printer is on. All the delays necessary are 
already part of the autostart circuitry in the 
TU- So in this case autoswitch costs three 
wires! A block diagram /schema tic of the 
lash-up is shown in Fig. L 

If your rig enables its oscillators by 
switching an emitter, a source, or a cathode, 
the connections are equally simple and are 
essentiaOy the same as in Fig. 1 except that 
the wiper of the channel switch is connected 

to ground. 

If you own a Regency or some other rig 
which switches the leads to the crystal 
directly don't attempt to run the leads out 
through the autoswitch network and back. 
You will be adduig intolerable lead length to 



the crystals. Instead, a system for switching 
the crystals with diode gates must be used. 
These have been described in other articles 
describing connection of automatic scanning 
circuitry to receivers with crystal lead 
switching. 

A method developed by Bob Reifsteck 
K2LZG for his Regency is shown in Fig, 2. 
Other methods for other circuits are shown 
m Fig, 3. 

One caution; in any system ^ always place 
the channel selector switch in the normal 
channel (not autoswitch) position when 
transmitting. If you leave it on autoswitch 
you're hable to find yourself back on the 
repeater when you want to be on the RTTY 
channel if your autoswitch switches off. 

Obviously the system is simple. It works 
extremely well here in Rochester where the 
number of VHF RTTY stations is reasonable 
and where the number of messages are low 
enougji to allow all stations to print all 
traffic. In larger metropolitan areas this 
simple system might have to be made more 
sophisticated by using a Touch-tone selective 
call for the autoswitch to keep the multi- 
tudinous printers (which eat gobs of paper) 
from printing messages not meant for them. 
When the situation gets that bad here in 
Rochester we'll go to Touch-Tone auto- 
switch. Meanwhile, we're happy and every- 
one is enjoying reading each other's mail, 

, - .K2YAH 



JUNE 1973 



53 



UP 

Professionally Engineereil Antenna Systems 





Single transmission line "TRI-BAND* ARRAY" 



By the only test that means anything . . • 
on the air comparison * , . this array con- 
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and has for two decades. Here's why 
. , , Telrex uses a unique trap design 
employing 20 HiQ 7500V ceramic con- 
densers per antenna. Telrex uses 3 opti- 
mum*spaced» optimum-tuned reflectors 
to provide maximum gain and true F/B 
Tri-band performance. 

ONLY TELREX GIVES YOU ALL 
THESE FEATURES * . . 

• Power rating 4 KW PEP . . . 
rain or shine 

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• Patented broad-band coaxial Balun 

• Heavy-duty steel gusset mounting 
plate 

• Aluminum boom 2 in., 21/2 in. O.D. 
X 18 ft, 

• Large diameter, .058 wall taper- 
swaged dural elements for minimum 



weight and exceptional strength 
to weight ratio 

• Stainless steei electrical hardware 

With a Telrex Tri-band Array you get 49 
lbs. of educated aluminum engineered 
and built to provide many, many years 
of performance unmatched around the 
world by any other make. Longest ele- 
ment 36 ft. Turning radius 20 ft. Shipping 
weight 65 lbs. Shipping container 13 in. 
X 5 in. X 13 ft. 

Note: If not available from your dealer, 
order direct. You'l get fast, personal 
service. 

Telrex Labs are design engineers, inno- 
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finest % to 160 meter communication 
systems and accessories priced from 
$25 to $25,000* 

For technical data and prices on com- 
ptete Telrex line, write for Catalog PL 71. 



TBS EM 



Other 
Multi-Band 
Arrays Available 






BALUN 



% 






jjfc' 



TRAP 



Elements shortened 
to show details. 



15M317 

20M326 

2M609 

2M814 
6M516 

and — 



TYPICAL TELREX "MONO-BAND" ANTENNAS 

- "Monarch", 10 DBD, 3 Ef., 4 KWP, 2-1/2" O.D, 17' boom 
• "Monarch", 10 DBD, 3 EL, 8 KWP, 3-1/2" O.D, 26' boom 
."Monarch", 14 D6D, 6 El., 6 KWP, t" O.D, 9' boom 
-"Monarch", 16 DBD, 8 El.. .8 KWP. 1.375" O.D. 14' boom 

- "Monarch", 13 DBD, 5 El.. .8 KWP. 1.5" O.D. 16' boom 

many, many more! send for PL -71 Dept. C 



—kl 



rex 



$175.00 
$355.00 
$ 39.95 
S 59.00 
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LABORATORIES 

TV And Communications Antennas Since 1921 
As bury Park. New Jersey 07712 201 -775-7252 



54 



73 MAGAZINE 



Clifford Klinert WB6BIH 
520 Division Street 
National City CA 92050 



FORTY METER 

"RANSMITTER 



A hybrid design Ifiat uaes Imnsistors in the 
I o iJD level s tages fo r stab Hi ly, an d e a.sily 
obtained tabes in the driver and final 
^sections for low cost. 



Transistor transmitters are becoming 
very popular with amateur builders 
today. The iow cost, very high frequency 
transmitting transistors that are now avail- 
able make them very popular for portable 
and mobile rigs. However, the cost and 
complications of building transmitters of the 
one hundred watt level with transistors still 
may be prohibitive for soma Since size, low 

weight, and low power consumption are not 
as important in transmitters built for home 
use, there has been a trend in the past few 
years to the hybrid concept. In hybrid 
circuits transistors and tubes are combined 
to bring out the most desirable character- 
istics of each. 

In this transmitter, transistors are used in 
the VFO and low level amplifier stages. This 
makes them ideal for this application be- 
cause of their low cost (at low power), 
simphcity (no filaments or screen grids to 
wire)j and low heat dissipation (for stable 



VFO's)< By using tubes in the driver and 
final amplifier stages, the signal is brought 
up to the lOOW level at junk box cost 

CW was used for simphcity because it is 
the desired mode at this QTH, AM modula- 




Since the tran^nitter was built from surplus parts, 
a strange marriage of components results. The old 
reactive load box chassis makes for a solid and 
good looking installation, however. 



JUNE 1973 



55 



■ 



Mkm TUNING 



X 

/7? 



01 



PAOD£R 

^50 MICA 



MPF-102 




-1-20 VDC 
Q 



TO 5763 
GRID 



it- 40 TURNS NO. 30 W\H€ OM t^2 
TOROID FORM. 

L2* 40 TURNS NO 30 WIR£ OM \^^' 
SLUQ TUNED FORM , 4 TURNS 
HOOIC'UP WlftE COLLECTOR WiNOINQ 




" tOOMH > I.2K 



DECIMAL VALUES OF CAPACITANCE ARt -M 
M1C#^0FARADS (UFJ OTHERS A^F PICOFARADS 
tPF on UUFJ 
RESISTANCES ARE IN OHMS K- lOOO 



Fig* L Schematic of the osciUator and amplifier. 



tion was not attempted because of the 
current unpopularity of this mode on the 
high frequency bands. 

The OscUlator 

The Seller circuit was chosen because of 
its reliability and excellent stability. The 
only critical component is the capacitor 
between the gate of the MPF-102 and the 
oscillator tank circuit. This capacitor should 
be just large enough to maintain stable 
oscillation. The coil used was about forty 
turns of number 30 wire on an Amid on 
T-50-2 toroid core* In a different experiment 
a slug tuned ceramic coil form was used. In 
this case a gate capacitor on the MPF-102 
had to be about 300 pF for stable operation. 
Either coil resulted in stable operation, but 
the toroid coil has higher Q, and supposedly 
better stabUity, The capacitor values given in 
the schematic of Fig. 1 give a range of 3.5 to 
3.6 MHz. Since this oscillator is so reliable 
and simple, it is easy to experiment with coil 
and capacitor values to give different fre- 
quency ranges. 

The amplifier uses a class A buffer and a 
class C output amplifier. Some people like to 
use FET's for buffers, but this was found to 
be unnecessary. The simple ampUfier shown 
in Fig. 1 was found to be entirely adequate. 
Almost any high frequency NPN silicon 
transistor could be used in the amplifier^ but 
the output transistor must be capable of 
handling a half watt of power or more, A 



resistor is used across the collector coil of 
the output transistor to prevent parasitic 
oscillation and other types of instability. By 
itself, the VFO would make a fine QRP rig 
for portable use. 

Driver and Final Amplifier 

The output stages of the transmitter use 
conventional tube circuitry, and very little 
explanation is necessary. The 6146's should 
be neutraUzed because they will go into 
oscillation if drive is reduced- However; 
there is usually more drive available than is 




Top view of the transmitter. The final amplifier 
with its associated circuitry is to the left and the 
VFO is at the right Note the small amount of 
space taken by the VFO board. With care, the 
transmitter could be built in a much smaller 
package. 



56 



73 MAGAZINE 



necessary and instability is no problem. The 
5763 need not be neutralized because it is a 
doubler from the 3,5 MHz oscillator to the 
7,0 MHz final amplifiers. The output 6146 
stage is cathode keyed while all the other 
stages run continuously during transmission. 
The tube portion is shown in Fig. 2. 

Power Supply 

The power required is 600V or more at 
300 mA, and 20V at about 50 mA. The 
filaments require six volts. The 20V supply 
should be well regulated for the VFO. In 
early bench tests a Hewlett-Packard labora- 
tory type power supply was used for the 
high voltage. This has almost perfect regula- 
tion and there was no chirp in the transmit- 
ter. However, when a power supply was 
built, it had poorer regulation. The high 
voltage output from the homebrew power 
supply had a 300V drop from no-load to 
loaded condition, resulting in a slight chirp. 
No one has ever noticed it, but it becomes 
more obvious when listening to harmonics of 
the transmitter. No attempts were made to 
clear it up, but some voltage regulator tubes 
in the screens of the driver and finals should 
help. 



The low voltage power supply was a half 
wave rectifier using a twelve volt filament 
transformer with the six volt filament 
voltage connected to the twelve volt side. 
Tliis gave about fifty volts on the other side 
of the transformer. The voltage is further 
dropped by the rectifier diode and the 
resistance of the fUter choke. A twenty volt 
ten watt zener diode was connected across 
the output for regulation. 

Other than this, the design and construc- 
tion of the power supplies will not be 
discussed. There are dozens of articles in 
magazines and handbooks that tell how to 
build adequate power supplies. 

Construction 

Only a brief discussion of the construc- 
tion will be given. Most hams who would 
want to build this circuit, or make use of 
some part of it, will have had enough 
experience to select and arrange 
components. The layout and wiring is really 
not very critical. The main consideration is 
following a logical step-by-step pattern 
where one stage follows another so that the 
output of one stage is not near the input of a 
previous stage. 



DECIMAL VALUES OF CAPACiTAI^GE ARE IN 
MICROFARADS, tUf> OTHERS ARE PICOFARADS 
(PF) OR (UUF* 
RESISTANCES ARE IH OHMS K* 1000 



ZO MHZ. 



INPUT FROM 
V FO. AMR 



5763 



3.5 MHZ 




- 40 TURNS NO. 30 0#^ K4' DIA- 

SLOG TUMEO FORM 
L*- 15 TURNS NO 18 ON I t«^ 

DIA FOf^M 
PC - S TURNS NO IS ON 47 OHM 

I WATT CARBON RESISTOR. 
ItfS - METER SHUNT. fOUNO 

CKPCRIMIN TALLY DEPENDING 

ON TYPE OF METER, 



600 VDC, 



Fig. 2, Driver and final amplifier, 
magazines and handbooks. 



This circuit is conventional and is similar to circuits found in many 



JUNE 1973 



57 



r 



CRYSTAL BARGAINS 




Depend on - . . 

We supply crystals frorn 
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6 million crystals in 
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SPECIAL 

Crystals for most ama- 
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ceivers: 

$3.75 Each 

Inquire about quantity 
prices. Order direct. 

Send check or money 
order. 



For first cfass mail add 15C per 
crystal, .for airmail add 20C es. 




CRYSTALS 



OIVfEION OF BOB 

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ELECTRONICS, INC. 

2400 Crystal Dr. 

Fort Myers 

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(813) 936-2397 

Send 100 for new 

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stock. 



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lExcept 60 meters} 4 

80 Meter Range in FT-243 
Color TV 3579 545 KH? (wire leads) 

4 




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LE.D. 7 SEGMENT READOUT - MAN 1 TYPE- 
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IC MASTER BOARD - PC Board with dual inline 
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dual in-line IC's. 10 V2x 5" undrilled S2.00 

TRANSFORMERS 

- 6 volt @ 1.5 amp -2 lb 

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-24 volt C.T. @ 1 amp - 2 \b 
-36 volt C.T @ 1.5 amp 
windings) - 2 lb 

10 Mhz CRYSTAL - standard HC-6/U in 24 volt 
oven - I \b $2.50 

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-0.5x2.125x1.78- 10 position dedmal $3,00 
-1 position BCD & CompI iment $4.00 

-End Plates (per pair) $1.45 

MINIATURE SIZE 

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-10 position BCD & Compliment 
'End Plates (per pair) 

BOXER FAN- 115C.F.M. 115 volt AC - NEW -3 
It^ $8.50 

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P/esse include sufficient postage. 



$1.75 
$2.00 
$2.00 
$2.50 
{2-18 volt 
$2.00 



$2.50 
$3.75 
$1,00 







The 40 meter transmitter mounted in a rack above 
its power supply. For novice use, just unplug one 
of the 6]46's to reduce the power level below 75 
watts. 



The oscillator stage is one of the most 
import ant. Even though it will not be 
subject to vibration, it is important to use 
solid mechanical techniques for the VFO- 
Since the VFO is not temperature compen- 
sated, it should be as far from heat pro- 
ducing components as possible. A small fan 
was mounted in the cabinet to blow hot air 
away from the VFO, thus providing excel- 
lent stability. 

Surplus and junk box components were 
used entirely, and the layout is really rather 
sloppy. Excellent performance resulted, 
however, illustrating the non-critical nature 
of the circuit. Perhaps some ambitious 
builder with more time (and money!) will 
come up with printed circuit boards and a 
neat cabinet. 

Conclusion 

This has been a very rewarding project. It 
illustrates how the transistor and tube can be 
used together to obtain the best character- 
istics of both within our present technology. 
The day of the all tube transmitter is gone 
forever, and the high power transistors of 
"today tend to 'Mate" even designs like this. 
Have fun though. 

. . .WB6B1H 



58 



73 MAGAZINE 



Ralph W. Campbell W4KAE 
316 Mariemon t Dr. 
Lexington KY 40505 



POLAR 



Attempting mo onb ounce is a full-time 
study concerned with azimuth and 
elevation, moon phases and not-so-amateur 
communication equipment. Those who suc- 
ceed are famous, and those who don't make 
it are ignored. Too many amateurs have been 
ignored since their attempts were un-proved, 
or at least un-recorded — but this is wrong, I 
think, because most of the hardware in- 
novated for this use is workable. 

I built a moon-tracking antenna about 20 
ft in boom length, with questionable success. 
I heard feeble, chirpy echoes during an 
aurora. I also had assistance in listening for 
echoes a few days later when both a good 
friend and I heard a chirpy twang as we 




The most important feature of this view is the 
pulley wheel. Using an untied system of ropes or 
cables was not considered because they would have 
been un-reset table and slip. Two small holes were 
driJied in the flattened Vee of the pulley far tying. 
Fastening the pulley to the already shimmed 
tubing did not hold this wheel without using 
threaded rod as a set-screw, tightened by a pair of 
vise-grip pliers, through the hole in the tubing. 



MOUNT 



pulsed the moon with irregular dashes. These 
echoes were not strong enough to be re- 
corded, but there was the characteristic 
receiving delay of just over 2.5 seconds from 
the time of key-down; as would be expec- 
ted! Having un- recorded echoes I felt it 
would be a good idea to share the ex- 
periences I had with inexpensively assembled 
azimuth and declination rotors and hard- 
ware. The antenna is not completely shown 
on purpose, so that complete details can be 
reported with recordable echoes at a later 
date. Many times Tve seen articles that 
supposedly told all, only to be left hanging 
as to mechanical construction. Here I intend 
to do a better job. 




The underside. The most important parts of the 
mount are: First, front and rear Toro drawbar 
springs; Second, the Alliance C-225 rotor mount; 
Third, aluminum strap bracing from the C-2 25 
body-to-mast; Fourth, the WB-3 house bracket 
fastened to rotating mast (above the nylon bear- 
ing); And fifthf the swivel top rotating boom plate, 
cut from a Dill tUt-over tower footing. 



JUNE 1973 



59 



Larsen Mobile 
Gain Antenna 

I44-I4BMHZ 




The result of over 25 years of two-way 
radio experience. Gives you . . . 

■ 3 db -t^ gain over 1/4 wave whip 

■ 6 db + gain for Gomplete system 
communications 

■ V.S.W,R. less than 1,3 to 1 

■ Low, low silhouette for better 
appearance 

The fastest growing antenna In ttw com* 
mercial 2-way field is now available to Ama- 
teurs. It's the antenna that tets you HEAR 
THE DIFFERENCE. Easily and quickly ad- 
lusted to any frequency. Hi-impact epoxy 
base construction for rugged long life* Silver 
plated whip radiates better. Handles full 100 
watts continuous. Models to fit any standard 
mount. Available as antenna only or com- 
plete with all hardware and coax. 

Get the full facts on this amazing antenna 
that brings signals up out of the noise . . . 
provides better fringe area talk power. Write 
today for fact sheet and prices. 



Said with a fu/i money back guarantee. 
You hear better or it costs nothing! 

also aval lab te . * . 

5 db Gain Antenna for 

420-440 MHz and 440-460 MHz 

Phased Collinear with same rugged construc- 
tion as Larsen 2 meter antennas and 5 db 
gain over reference 1/4 wave whip. Models 
to fit all mounts. Comes with instructions. 

Write today for full fact sheet and price. 



i^^'- 



I 



fU 









11611 N.E. 50th Ave 
Phone 206/695 5383 





Vancouver, WA. 98665 



Theory 

Not being more than average, mechani- 
cally, I cannot always use the most exact 
terms to describe my efforts; but as an 
amateur I can point out the approach. Most 
AZ-EL mounts usually refer to 360 azi- 
muth and 90 elevation rotor systems, using 
crossed masts and belHype rotors positioned 
in some sort of box. This is fine for those 
who can afford it! However, I used every 
short cut possible. I rotated the declination 
rotor on the "azimuth mast" and then I 
tilted the whole tower on a Pickle base. The 
Pickle base is a 4 ft section of tower with 
movable lugs and welded sheet metal, sunk 
Vh ft into sandy soil — instead of concrete. 
One secret which should be passed on is the 
use of a nylon bearing in the top-section 
which supports the mast. Without the bear- 
ing (see photo) it would be impossible to 
swing the array in any direction desired 
because of mechanical drag. An underside 
view shows two draw-bar springs which take 
up slack and allow for 180^ control-box 
indication on the declination rotor. 

Only 50° of declination rotor control is 
necessary within the 180^ available. That is. 




ITiis ^Q^s the side view of the mount and the 
telescope. Hie telescope is mads from a piece of 
J}^ in. OD aluminuni thinwalL It is painted with 
high-heat flat-back auto paint to minimize internal 
reflections. A plus 3 diopter closeup lens is used 
for the optics. This lens is mounted in a series 5 
adapter ring, taped to the tubing. An RCA cad- 
mium salfo-^Ienide photoconductive cell is 
mounted inside. We also used a teflon disc insit^ 
the tubing, with Loc-Tite epoxy, for cell mountmg. 
Black silicone rubber is used as the encapsulent. 
The aluminum thin wall is 13 in. long. 



60 



73 MAGAZINE 




This photo shows bracing of the leaning tower. 
Correct aiming toward the north is most accurately 
done by incling the structure toward the North 
Star, In my case, an rdinary pocket compass was 
adequate since there is only 1 difference between 
true north and magnetic north. The actual tilt 
angle is 52 relative to a flat horizon; earlier we 
said that 90 minus your northern latitude: so, 90 
minus 58 is the tilt angle used here, 

minimum boom-swing is conveniently 
limited to plus and minus 25 about a right 
angle subtended on the tilted mast for an arc 

o 

across the sky. The rotor indication of 180 
is well in excess of this. Moon wobble is 
caused by the varying orbit of the moon on 
a day-to-day basis, but the average value of 
the wobbles is always from east to west 
across the sky. To follow this arc exactly, it 
is necessary to incline the tower by 90 minus 
your north latitude in degrees. 

Construction 

Most of the mechanical parts secured to 




The rotary torsion bar. Although this idea Is 
that of K3ZEU, it works equally well for moon- 
bounce or regular hamming! This device allows a 
*'give" to rota dona J torque encountered when 
starting or stopping a large antenna. The welded 
plumber *s pipe used is internally overlapped to 
strengthen the mast About 1 in. clearance exists 
between the overlapped end and the "washer'* 
below. 



the boom are attached with South River 
WB-3 aluminum house brackets. Hy-Gear 

screw-straps are used elsewhere (for bracing 
and for the telescope mount). The swivel-top 
boom plate was cut from a Dill Uft-up roof 
mount and drilled for 2 WB-S'S. The drawbar 
springs are available as Toro lawnmower 
parts and should be easily found. They 
connect the threaded nylon fishline to the 
boom and declination pulley, SUppage is 
prevented by connecting the line throuiJi 
the flattened Vee of the pulley; then pulled 
through 3/16 in* steel washers and Jcnotted* 




A cJose-up view of 2 type 101 nylon bearings. The 
nylon rod is chosen to have a diameter which will 
fit (by press-fitting) the inside of the tower mount- 
Prior to this, the nylon rod stock is chucked in a 
lathe and a IH in. hole is cut lengthwise. The two 
deeve bearings shown here are 3 in. long; however, 
they're drilled Hi in. for other tower mast size. 
After the original IH in. piece was drilled it was 
hammered into the moujit, ma Jong a forced- fiu 

The AR-22R rotor is located on a pre- 
drilled mounting tab inside the top section. 
Top and bottom bells are drilled and have 
'5/16 in, steel bolts through the mast^ Gear 
slop with this rotor is 6 , which is not 
exceeded by this method of fastening. The 
C-225 rotor has only 3H slop, however; so 
it was chosen for declination positioning. 
Bolt threads are treated with Loc-Tite Nut 
Lock to prevent loosening. The Browning 
pulley was successfully shimmed using 
lengthwise cut aluminum thin- wall tubing. 

To those who wiU try moonbounce, let 
them experiment with this method and take 
some of these short-cuts. Maybe this article 
will help solve some problems! Anyway, 
E.M,E. will be more in style now with 
special emphasis placed on communi- 
cations-through-repeater from the moon. 

. • .W4KAE 



JUNE 1973 



61 



MM 





-^-vt^c 






^i^^ 

^^>^ 
^<^^^ 




ROHN manufacturers 
towers that are designed and 
engineered to do specific jobs 
and tliat is why we have the FOLD- 
OVER TOWER . , . designed for the amateur. 
When you need to "get at" your antenna just turn,/; 
the handle and there it is. Like other ROHN big^ 
communication towers, they re hot dip galvanized 
after fabrication to provide a maintenance free, 
long lived and attractive installation, ROHN towers 
are known and used throughout the world ,, , for 
almost a quarter century ... in most every type of 
operation. You'll be in good company. Why not 
check with your distributor today? 







ROHN 



MANUFACTURING 



® 



DIVISION Of 



P.O Box 2000/ Peoria, III. 61601 




James M. Talens K3MNJ 

8361 Langdon Street 
Philadeiphia PA 19152 



URBAN 
QUAD 




The merits of the cubical quad have 
already been established, its inherent 
weaknesses noted and suitably assessed 
against its formidable strengths, and a my- 
riad of articles published describing various 
configurations, including one rather unusual 
array describing the 3-4-6 quad which ap- 
peared in this hallowed journal in November, 
197K 

The quad pictured is a good all-around 
antenna for the urban dweller who has 
limited space and wants something better 
than the typical commercial triband Yagi, 
and something cheaper! Clearly it is not an 
isotropic source and requires some room, 
but no more than the triband Yagi — less, in 
fact. It consists of 4 elements on 10m, 3 on 
15m and 2 elements on 20m, The spacing is 
a bit wide on 20m, but there is significant 
front-to-back and forward gain and a broad- 
banded ness that comes in handy when shift- 
ing from low end CW to high end SSB. The 
spacing on the other bands is somewhat 
closer to optimal for forward gain, and the 
array performs most impressively on all 




(OMR 
20Mft 



OE 



bands at a height of only 10.5 meters. The 
boom is 460 cm long. 

In general, the longer the boom length of 
a directive array - whether Yagi or quad — 
the higher the forward gain. The unique 
character of the quad is that for a given 
required gain it need be only about 0*56 as 
long as its Yagi counterpart.* Thus, this 
described quad should approximately equal 
in performance a Yagi with a boom length of 
approximately 800 cm* Sounds familiar? 
Look at the boom length of the larger 
triband Yagis currently advertised. The ques- 
tion, of course, is whether this antenna does 
as well. 

The following figures are arithmetic 
averages of a number of tests made with 
local hams; they do not reflect the low angle 
of radiation proffered by the quad, nor 
variations in height or environment. They 
only suggest that this antenna is at worst in 
the same league as those larger triband Yagis 
and at best is better. It is significantly better 
than the typical triband Yagi. 



*By virtue of vertical 
lobe compression 




lOM 
D! 




\ ^ 



aOM DE 



Fig. 1 . The Urban Quad. 



JUNE 1973 



63 



«■ 



730CM 



520 CM 



370 CM 




|)5CM 




\22CM- 




M5CM 



-4eOCM 



Fig. 2. Elemen t spacing. 



Front to 10m 15m 20m 

side; 45 dB 34 dB 23 dB 

back: 26 dB 23 dB 19 dB 

There was no convenient way to make 
forward gain measurements, and indeed a 
fraction of a dB one way or the other is 
insignificant and wiU even vary to some 
extent as a function of height, tuning, etc. 
The point is that this antenna, with only 2 
elements on 20m and a 460 cm boom is 
performing well! 

Parts and Cost 

Improvements may be made on the fol- 
lowing figures by using scrap supphes or 
other materials, but compare the cost with a 
Yagi of similar characteristics. 



Bamboo poles (12-460 cm long; 

8-24 cm long) 

Clamps with stainless screws, #14 wire . 

460 cm boom: 5 cm OD, 1/8'' wall 

Aluminum plates for spreader-boom 

mounting (from junk yard) ..___. 

Coax, RG8/U (3-23ra rolls) 

3 baluns 

Length of quarter wave transformer, 

RG9/U 

Total (plus cables) , _ _ . , 



$15 

.25 
AS 

..6 



$61 



The array has withstood 64 knot winds 
and Hurricane Agnes with no damage save a 
broken wire at the balun4o-loop tie point of 
the 20m driven element (which could have 
been avoided had #14 wire been used 
instead of #16). Number 14 has been speci- 
fied in the list. At this QTH a fair amount of 
antenna experimentation is done, so bamboo 
is practical; but fiberglass arms would pro- 
bably be a more suitable material since the 
antenna will likely be up for quite some 



time! However, the bamboo in this array has 
been in quad antennas for four years now 
and has only recently begun to show signs of 
weathering. 

Tuning 

Regarding tuning, the spreader assemblies 
are constructed on the ground and cut to 
approximate dimensions, preferably a few 
cm shorter than that required. After mount- 
ing them on the boom and hoisting it all off 
the ground, tuning is accomphshed using a 
grid dip meter, and wire added at the stub 
tie points as required for ±5% tuning on 
15m and 10m, and -3% center frequency 
resonance for the 20m reflector (longer!, 
since that band already is somewhat broad 
by virtue of wide spacing and a bit tighter 
coupling is necessary to lower the impedance 
and achieve lower vswr. In addition, a 
quarter wave matching transformer (RG9/U) 
was used between the balun and the feedline 
on 20m, though the need for this may 
depend on tuning. The vswr curves will tell 
you whether you need the transformer. The 
wide spacing is worth the return of improved 
performance on 15 and 10. 20m does not 
seem to suffer from wide spacing- 
Performance 

The other day on 1 5m SSB, half the east 
coast was calling EA9EJ (I heard them 
back-scatter, thanks to the low angle of 

radiation!) and K3MNJ worked him first 
call (Should I also mention that 1 called in 
Spanish?) No, the antenna is not in the 
K3JH class, but it does well against those 
t riband Yagis and is relatively compact and 
inexpensive. For those in urban centers, it 
may be just the thing- 

. . .K3MNJ 



64 



73 MAGAZINE 



Carl C. Drumeller W5JJ 
5B24N.W. 58 Street 
Warr Acres OK 73122 




AND 
REFLECTED POW 




Some {hi ng you 11 understand if and 
only if you read this article. 



Reflected power in mal-terminated 
transmission lines has triggered more 
discussion, argumentation, and even anxiety 
than almost any subject since the famous 
power factor debates of the early 1920's, 
Some of the anxieties and worries engen- 
dered by overconcem about possible ill 
effects to equipment or excessive loss of 
transmitted power can be relieved by the 
application of logical reasoning. And that 
application of logic is the purpose of this 
article, 

Let's start with an antenna — an antenna 
so constructed that its feedpoint impedance 
is 12.8n. It doesn't matter too much if that 
impedance is composed wholly of resistance 
or of an admixture of reactance and resis- 
tance- In either case, it offers a 4:1 imped- 
ance mismatch to a 521Z transmission line. 

In order to effect a match between the 
line and the antenna, we put an impedance 
transforming device between the two. This 



may be one of many different forms; you 
can call it a Matchbox, a Transmatch, or any 
other term. In each instance its function is 
to transform that 12.SQ impedance to a 
resistance of 52n. 

When such a transform has been accom- 
plished, the transmission line is matched to 
its load, there are no standing waves on the 
line, and the transmitter feeding it is 
**happy." This is the condition you want to 
attain and maintain. 

There is no compelling reason that the 
impedance matching device must be located 
at the junction of the Hne and the antenna* 
Suppose you place it down 10 feet from the 
junction. Then the line from the device to 
the transmitter retains its matched condition 
and the transmit tcr still is happy. But what 
about that 10-foot stretch of line between 
the device and the antenna? Won't there be 
reflected power coming back from the an- 
tenna because of the 4: 1 VSWR? And won't 



JUNE 1973 



6S 



TR-4 
XCVR 



L 



Adjusted to provide 
100 watts rf output. 
Cathode current noted. 



L 



W-4 

FORWARD 

AND 

REFLECTED 

WATTS 



Indicates 100 watts for- 
ward and watts re^ 
fleeted. 



S2 0HM 
LINE 



MN-4 

MATCHING 
NETWORK 



Adjusted to pass rf 
through its network 
without altering Its 
character istics. I ndi- 
cat©s 100 watts for- 
ward, watts reflected. 



■* 



BIRD 

TERMALINE 
S2 OHMS 



Purely resistive load 



Fig, 1. Properly matched transmitter (ruiming 100 watts output) indicates 100 watts forward and 

watts reflected on the wattmeter. 



that reflected power be lost, be deleted from 
that available for radiation from the anten- 
na? 

Yes, there'll be reflected power in the 
10-foot section of line, and this will result in 
a 4:1 VSWR on that section. But no, there 
will be no appreciable power deleted from 
that available for radiation from the anten- 
na. 

Let's consider why. In the first instance, 
when the impedance matching occurred 
right at the antenna/feed Une junction, any 
reactive element of the antenna feed point 
impedance was negated by a conjugate reac- 
tance presented by the matching device. 
Then the remaining element, purely resistive, 
was transformed by the matching device to 
52fi. The same situation prevails in the 
second instance, too. However, the magni- 



TR-4 
XCVR 



* 



MN4 
MATCHING 
WETWORK 



tudes of resistance and reactance, and even 
the sign (+ or -) of the reactance may be 
change ds especially so if thdt 10 -foot length 
represented any appreciable fraction of a 
wavelength, as it would on 6 meters or even 
10 meters. But the situation of reflected 
power remains unchanged; it existed at 
foot, would exist at 0,25 foot, and exists at 
10 feet. In each of these situations the only 
actual loss of power is that dissipated in the 
form of heat. 

With a VSWR of 4: 1, the peak magnitude 
of voltage present on a transmission line wiU 
be four times that which it would be if the 
line were "flat." The peak value of current 
also will be four times as high. There will be 
definite points of high voltage and definite 
points of high current. Each high voltage 
point is a half- wave removed from another. 



W-4 

FORWARD & 

REFLECTED 

WATTMETER 



52 OHMS 



52 OHM 



LINE 



Adjusted to provide 
100 watts oytput. Cath- 
ode current same as in 
first exercise. 



Adjusted to transform 
12,8 ohms to 52 ohms. 
Indicates 100 watts. 



Indicates 120 watts for- 
ward and 20 watts re 
fleeted. 



52 OHMS 



52 OHMS 



12.8 OHM 
LOAD 




Fig. 2. Improperly matched transmitter (still running 100 watts) indicates 120 watts forward and 20 
watts reflected. 100 = 140? 



66 



73 MAGAZINE 



and each high current point is a half-wave 
removed from another. Each of these high 
(voltage or current) points occurs at a spot 
on the transmission Une where the line 
appears as purely resistive. At the high 
voltage points there will be dielectric losses 
in proportion to E^/R, and at the high 
current points copper losses represented by 
I^R. These losses are in addition to those 
normal losses present in a transmission Une, 
even when the Kne is "flat." The energy 
consumed by such losses is dissipated in the 
form of heat. 

But what about reflected * 'power?" Note 
that **power** is placed in quotation marks, 
indicating doubt as to its reality. Can one 
use logic, logic based upon a demonstrated 
and reproducible illustration to ascertain 
whether the **power" is real or illusionary? 
Yes, Very easily and simply* 

Here is what I did: I used a Drake TR-4, a 
Drake MN-4 matching network, a Drake W-4 
forward and reflected power meter, and four 
Bird Termaline 52^ dummy loads. See Figs. 
1 and 2 for how they w^re connected. 

Using one 52f2 load initially, with the 
W-4 between the TR-4 and the MN-4, the 
TR-4 was tuned and loaded to display 100 
watts output into the dummy load- This 
value of power was confirmed both by the 
W-4 and the MN-4 after the latter was 
properly adjusted. Then the TR-4 was con- 
nected directly to the MN-4, and the W-4 
was moved to between the MN-4 and a new 
terminal load. This load was constituted by 
four Termaline loads connected in parallel 
by means of "T" connectors and very short 
lengths of 5212 RG-8/U cable. This combina- 
tion presented a load of 12.81i and was 
purely resistive* With such a load, the VSWR 
was 4:1- Next, the MN-4 was readjusted to 
present a 5212 load to the TR-4, which was 
still generating 100 watts of rf power, as 
verified by the wattmeter function of the 
MN-4. But what about the forward power 
and the reflected power as shown by the 
W"4? In the forward position, it indicated 
120 watts; in the reflected position, it 
indicated 20 watts! 

Now one sits back and exercises a bit of 
logical thinking. You know quite well that 
there was no supplementary power- 
generating device introduced into the circuit. 



The 100 watts produced by the TR-4 is the 

I! 

sole source of rf power in the circuit. Unless 
there's '*black magic" concerned, that extra 
20 watts of power surely must be illusion- 
ary! Then there*s that coincidence of the 
inexplicable 20 watts of not-^enerated-by- 
the-transmitter power being exactly matched 
by 20 watts of reflected power! 

It doesn't require much apphcation of 
logic to come to a valid conclusion: The 
extra 20 watts of forward power and the 20 
watts of reflected power cannot be true 
power- 

This so-called power is represented by 
standing waves on the feed line. A quick 
inspection of the points of minimum current 
and minimum voltage {these are more easily 
located than the points of maxunum current 
and maximum voltage) shows that they are 
90 electrical degrees apart. A quick reference 
to alternating current theory shows that 
power is equal to current times voltage times 
the cosine of the angle between the first 
two. Another quick reference^ this time to a 
table of cosines, shows that the cosine of 
90 is zero. And, of course, any number 
multiplied by zero is zero. 

Therefore your application of logic has 
demonstrated that reflected "power" is a 
fiction, a vicious fiction that has caused 
many radio amateurs much worry and con- 
cern. 

The knowledge of reflected '*power** 
being truly a figment of nomenclature 
should not be taken as proof of a low VSWR 
being of no worth. Under certain circum- 
stances, it can be sorely needed. But when 
your transmitter will load normally into 
your transmission Une, there is no need for 
you to be concerned over a VSWR of 5:1, 
certainly not one of 4: L If your transmis- 
sion line is less than several wavelengths long 
at the frequency you're using, the amount of 
power that you'U lose as heat along the 
transmission Une will be quite negligible. But 
if your transmitter doesn't load happily into 
your line, then you need some sort of an 
impedance matching device between your 
transmitter and your line. It won't increase 
the amount of rf power your antenna will 
radiate, but it will make your transmitter 
happy! 

. - -W5JJ 



JUNE 1973 



67 




SEND FOR NEW 
W72Vt CATALOQ 




GREGORY ELECTRONICS CORP. 

The FM Used Equipment People. 

243 Route 46, Saddle Brook, N. J. 
Phone (201) 773-7550 



The General Electric 



Message Mate 



personal pocket 
voice receiver 
with sel-calf 



Fully transistonzed, 100% solid-state for 
the ultimate in reliability and perform- 
ance- 
Selective signating options provide for in- 
dividual messages both inside end out- 
side of buildings. 

Operates in full compliance with Part 15 
of the FCC rules. 



150-162 MHz, 162-174 MHz 

Specify Frequency Range When Ordering. 



$ 



98. 



less reeds 



(Charger included with nickel-cadmium 

model) 

Ask about low band models. 

Lots Of 5 less 10% • , , each $88.20 

Lots of 10 less 15% . . . , . .each ^83.30 



The General Electric 

Pocket Mate 
Portable 

PERSONAL TWO-WAY 
FM RADIO 

148-174 MHz, 1 watt, 
full solid State. , . . 



158. 



Includes rechargeable 
nickel cadmium bat- 
tery and charger, 



68 



73 MAGAZINE 




GREGORY ELECTRONICS CORP 

The FM Used Equipment People. 

243 Route 46, Saddle Brook, N. J. 
Phone (201) 773-7550 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 

VOICE COMMANDER 

Full Solid State FM Transmitter Receiver 
132-150 and 150-174 MHz/Size: 9.5 ' x 5.3" x 1.7" 
1 watt output, .5 micro-volt sensitivity. 

High performance, completely setf-contarned two-way 

FM radio. Compact, [ightweight, easily operated and 
hand-carried. Housed in high-impact, 2'Section case. 
All external hardware polished stainless steel. Top 
section has transmitter and receiver modules, built-in 
mike and speaker, antenna, carrying handle, all 
switches and controls, Rottom section has battery 
power supply. Power connections to top section made 
by plug and jack connection. 




SB NO FOR NEW 
rfl73!^ CATALOG 



$ 



138. 



Crystals ancf tuning, add $50. 

Proper chargers available 
separately, each $15. 



includes rechargeable 
nrckel cadmium bat- 
tery pack and charger 




Lots Of 5 less 10% - $124.20 
Lots of 10 less 15% — $117.30 



ProScan 

Monitor Radio Receiver 



Factory New 

100% Programmable 



Complete with all boards to operate 
on any or all three bands/AC-DC cords 
included/ built-in speaker /external 
speaker jack/mobile mounting brack- 
et/push-button channel selection/ 
squelch /delay switch/scan-manuai 
switch/ local-DX switch for high den- 
sity signal areas /on-off- volume/ ad- 
justable squelch and scan rate 
control. Crystals not included, but 
available at $5, each. 




Frequency: 

LoBand 25-50 MHz 

VHF 150-174 MHz ±: 
UHF 450-470 MHz ±: 



± 7 MHz 
10 MHz 
10 MHz 



Sensitivity: .5 microvolt for 20DB quieting 
Size; 8" x 8" x 3VShipping weight 8 lbs. 



Price on Request 



16-Channel Programmable Scanner 
LoBand. VHF. UHF - Base Station or Mobile. 



JUNE 1973 



69 



RECIPE 

FOR 
GARNISH 



David J. Brown W9CGI 
RR5, Box 39 
Nobiesville IN 46060 




COUNTER 




My compliments to the chef! The chef 
in this case being Mr. Peter Stark 
K20AW. His article in the May, July and 
September 1972 issues of 73 Magazine has 
presented ham radio with a top grade piece 
of test equipment right when we need it- 
Amateurs should be building at least their 
own test equipment, and the prices and 
availability of the required parts are at their 
best- For almost the price of a good VTVM 
kit, you too can own a commercial quality 
counter. 

While this is a construction article, let me 
say that Mr- Stark's counter worked per- 
fectly the first time without any of my 
additions. This says a lot for the three-part 
layout, good board design, and a lot of hard 
work on his part- The additions I am going 
to suggest for his circuit are, as my title 
impUes, gilding an otherwise already fine 
lily! T will present the additions so that any 
one or all of them can be made, since each 
change is complete in itself- 



Accuracy 

This is the name of the game when dealing 
with frequency counters. International 
Crystal was quick to fix me up with a good 
crystal by only sending them a schematic of 
the circuit and Mr. Stark's suggestions on 
this item. I purchased a 10.00000 MHz 
crystal for $9,50 in holder HA 505. It fits 
the pins removed from a 9 -pin miniature 
socket and soldered into the board at the 
proper spacing* 1 like plug in crystals for ease 
m changing and do not like to heat up an 
accurate crystal. Also, if you later use an 
oven of the right temperature this one could 
plug right in. This should solve the one part 
that may be hard to find in some areas- They 
will air mail the crystal well protected 
against shipping hazards. The accuracy of 
my crystal is .0005% (specify a high ac- 
curacy crystal when ordering). They are 
listed under Medium Frequency Crystals in 
the catalog. 



70 



73 MAGAZINE 



Further on the subject of accuracy, 
several good articles have appeared recently 
on WWV converters and receivers (73 Maga* 
zine^ November '72, page 59, WA801K , for 
example). If you allow enough room in your 
enclosure it is worthwhile to build one into 
the counter. Depending on your WWV recep- 
tion it can be designed for 5.0 or 10.0 MHz^ 
since you have both frequencies coming off 
the timebase divider chain of IC's* I chose a 
small soUd state AM radio available from 
many of 7J's advertisers for $5 to $10, and 
put it into a small aluminum enclosure with 
an International Crystal SAX-1 (lo kit) rf 
amplifier, MXX-l (lo kit) mixer, SAX-1 (lo 
kit) i'f amplifier-buffer, and OX oscillator 
(lo kit) running at 10.7 MHz for an instant 
converter to 700 kHz on the broadcast band. 
If you like this combination as well as I do, 
you can always build a duplicate for mobile 
use. Choose a quiet spot on the AM band for 
your own particular i-f frequency. Order the 
EX type crystal for the oscUlator module by 
either adding or subtracting the i-f frequency 
from 10 MHz or 5 MHz, depending on the 
WWV signal desired- In this area (central 
Indiana) a small collapsible CB handi-t alkie 
replacement whip on the cabinet is enough, 
but a BNC fitting also feeds the rf module 
just in case, 

A Case for Your Better Mousetrap 

While aluminum boxes are being dis- 
cussed, the enclosure you choose adds both 
to the looks and its versatility. Since my 
station is all Drake, with homebrew acces- 
sory items built into Drake enclosures, it was 
a natural that 1 chose that type of enclosure 
for the counter. An R/L, Drake TR-6 cabinet 
was ordered with black finis h^ for approxi- 
mately $16 postpaid- A panel was punched 
out of .06 aluminum, I used a 10x12x3" 

aluminum chassis (common size) for the 
mainframe. Cut out the front (10x3) to clear 
the hardware mounted to the front panel, 
but leave six places for 6-32 screws to mount 
the panel. A cutout is made in the top of the 
mainframe (10x12 surface) the same size as 
the outer copper dimensions of the K20AW 
circuit board, leaving a 10x5 area for a 
10x5x2 box above the mainframe in which 
to mount the converter-radio, and a 10x5 
area below the mainframe on which to 



mount the transformers, power supply 
board, etc Using the large enclosure yields 
more space for other modifications. 

Hi*Lo Circuits 

I used separate BNC fittings to feed the Hi 
and Lo inputs to allow quick switching 
between two points in most FM gear, etc. By 
making the Hi-Lo input switch a DPDT unit, 
one half can be used as the original SPST, 
and the other half is wired to two small low 
drain 6V panel mount bulbs from Southwest 
Technical Products (in your choice of 
colors), I mounted these bulbs above their 
respective BNC connectors to tell at a glance 
which input was being monitored- 

Test Count and Timebase 

As can be seen in Fig. 1 , one other change 
is made to add a feature found on the more 
expensive counters available. You can in- 
directly read the 10.0 MHz crystal timebase 
clock generator to determine it is running 
accurately by adding a SPST momentary 
pushbutton switch to the front panel below 
and between the Hi-Lo lamps< A wire is run 
close to the board from IC-26 pin 14 to one 
side of the switch, and from IC-4 pins 6 or 9 
to the other side of the switch. Keep the 
leads close to the board, as the timebase 
chain runs 1.2 V to 4-2V squarewaves and 
that makes an rf generator rich in harmonics 
if long unshielded leads are not dressed 
carefully. Momentarily pushing this switch 
will light 1 0000 on the readout if the 
timebase switch is in Hz or 00010 if in kHz 
position, A nice fast check on aU being weU 



TO 1C26 ^ 
PIN 14 



( 10 KHr) 



ADD PANEL 



-V- SPST 





PUSHBUTTON 



Fig. 1 (modified Fig, 5 of the original K20AW 

Counter article). Test count modification. Pushing 
switch will cause the counter to read the frequency 
of the 10 kHz time base to determine proper 
operation. 



JUNE 1973 



71 



LEAD TO IC3I-9 
a RES 



TO 
LAMP*- 




7 



MM 




lC-31 



^^|QH-^A/V 



lOK 




/ A "^ ^ n 



Fig. 2 (modified Fig, 23), Modification of the PC 
board to incorporate the extra circuitry in Fig, 3. 



in thai territory, both after building and in 
the future. 

While in the timebase circuit, run a lOK 
*^W resistor from IC-29 pm 11 (I Hz) to a 
nearby open area (no copper pads) and 
solder a lead from this resistor to a like open 
area around the large filter capacitor at the 
rear corner of the board. (See modified 
layout. Fig. 2.) Drill five small (#60) holes 
per the new layout to mount a transistor to 
be wired as in Fig. 3. The hole on the edge 
of the board is ground for the transistor 
emitter. The remaining holes accept the base 
and the wire from the ! OK resist or* Run the 
wire through the board from the top (com- 
ponent side) and fold it and the transistor 



6V-30mA 

PANEL 

LAMP 




ADD 
I0K-I/2W 



e 



AA/V- 




3N3643 

(ANY 30V 
AT 100 m A3 



IC31-9 



base lead to meet one another and solder. 
This forms your own '*pad'' as there is no 
copper here. The last two holes are for the 
collector and one lead of another Southwest 
Technical Products panel lamp mounted 
below the over-range lamp. The remaining 
lead of this new lamp goes to the 3J6V 
Numitron supply as did the added Hi-Lo 
lamp source leads. The lamp blinks on and 
off one time per second giving a reassuring 
bMnk to let you know aU is alive and well in 
the timebase circuit. It doesn't check the 
gating controls, but it tells you a crystal and 
8 of 33 ICs are running o.k. Even if you 
don't build in the WWV circuits, it would be 
wise to put this one in, 



to Hz 



IHi 



TO FIG 17 
3.15V SUPPLY 



Fig. 3 (modified Fig. 8), The addition of a 
transistor f a lamp and a resistor adds a visual 
indication of the operating timebase* 



Timebase — The Hard Way 

By putting in the 1 Hz lamp you can evon 
calibrate the counter to a reasonable degree 
if you are patient enough. It's not a super 
accurate means, but it beats no way at aU. 
Count the blinks for exactly 3-5 minutes and 
compare with the number of seconds in the 
time period you use (180 blinks for 3 
minute period » etc.). Obviously you should 
use an electric chronometer with smooth 
sweep second hand as your "standard," and 
this ""formula" should be modified for non 
60 cycle mains areas. Compare your *'clock'' 
blinks to the standard used and correct your 
trimmer capacitor to make your clock faster 
(more blinks) or slower. Power companies 
maintain 60 CPS ±1 Hz for line frequency, 
and most keep their short term accuracy 
even closer since the National Grid System 
was started. This way your standard clock 
can give you a very accurate 3 or 5 minute 
period to use. Give this method a try in your 
area whether you use the WWV method or 
not and let me know your results, 1 know we 
were somewhat amazed how close one can 
get with patience. We have gotten to within 
10 Hz on the 10 MHz crystal- 



Readout Check 

This is another item '^borrowed" from 
more expensive counters at the cost of a 
SPST pushbutton switch. If you are not well 
acquainted with the ICs used in the project 
as 1 am by my employment, you could 
overlook this addition that is already in- 



72 



73 MAGAZINE 



eluded in the ICs. By carefully connecting aU 
of the pin 3's of the SN7446 or SN7447 
readout drivers (whichever you use) to« 
gether, and then to one side of the SPST 
switch mentioned, and then connect the 
other side of the switch to ground, you have 
a readout check. Mount the switch on the 
back apron, as it is not used often. Pushing 
the button briefly (easy on the power 
supply, fellas!) will light all the readouts 
with the number **8'* (all segments lit). This 
allows check for filament burnout on Numi- 
trons, open wiring during construction, etc, 




PIN 3 OFIC'S 



J *^ 

1 



BACK APRON 

SPST 

PUSHBUTTON 



Fig, 4 (modified Fig, 6). Readout ch^k. Pressing 

the pushbutton causes all segments of the readouts 
to HghU 



Burnout Protection 

The ECL IC logic being somewhat expen- 
sive, you may want to use the same protec- 
tion used by K20AW in the June 1972 73 
Magazine article featuring his 300 MHz 
frequency scaler. While in the counter he 
uses an extra amplifier ahead of the some- 
what "touchy" IC 2, it still is comforting to 
have the added protection of the old criss- 
cross diodes trick of the receiver/converter 
days. Use 1N9I4 diodes just as he did in the 
June article. See Fig, 5. 



Accuracy — Accuracy 

f n the section under accuracy 1 mentioned 
the clocking method, but don't get the idea 1 
either prefer it or enjoy the long "blinking'' 
count (pardon the British pun, it*s my 
English ancestry). 1 have for some time now 
used a very inexpensive zero-beat method 
that tops all I have tried. I have used it to 
zero commercial, amateur, and test gear, and 
just wasn't aware it wasn't as weU known as 







50J1: 



0.1 



^^ 




IC2A 




ADD 
lN9r4'S 



Fig. 5 (modified Fig. 4). The addition of back to 
back lN914's adds burnout protection to the front 
end, 

I thought. (See Fig. 6, added). I mounted a 
speaker in the lid of my TR-6 enclosure 
since it is already perforated for heat, A 
shielded cable (RG-174 type, etc.) is used to 
route it to the back apron of the mainframe. 
One other small module is added to the 
converter compartment, namely Fig. 6. 
Audio is tapped off the speaker lead and fed 
to the zero-beat detector. Normal leakage or 
a small lead is used from IC 22 pin 8 to the 
input rf Sax-1 module to couple a small 
amount of 1 0.0 MHz rf from the timebase to 
the converter- Turn up the volume on the 
BC radio and tune in WWV by rocking the 
BC tuning capacitor around the i-f frequency 
you have chosen. With the counter turned 
on you should have a nice clear beat note if 
coupling is correct. Trim this note down as 
close to zero CFS as you can by adjusting 
(slowly!) the counter's trimmer capacitor. 
This will put you within 15 to 20 cycles if 
you have reasonably good hearing ability. 
Now, the fact the ear is a good detector 
from 40 to 15,000 CPS, and the eye is only 
good for pulsations of zero to 40 CPS, leads 
you to conclude that when you are at 
15—20 CPS and trying for zero it is time to 
change detectors! By using the circuit shown 
in Fig, Ay you can now see the 15—20 CPS, 
and by slowly trimming the counter trimmer 
you can hit fairly near zero. Remember that 
we are referring to "per second/' If you 
carefully do your job, one cycle per ten 
seconds is not hard to come by. Where's that 
steady hand and patience? 

To get my crystal to '*zero" first I used a 
14 pF NPO fixed capacitor in place of the 
33 pF in parallel with the trimmer. Next, a 
piston trimmer 1 to 5 pF is added in parellel 
with the trimmer as a '*fine" adjust. Make a 



JUNE 1973 



73 



f 



^^ 



4- <QQQ^F 



LI* PRIMARY OF SPEAKER TRANSFORMER 
ALL TRANSISTORS- 2N3643 




-- 3 15V 
SUPF 



200^ F 



LAMP (\^ 




LAMP 



-a>j 



F/g, 6. Schematic of the added zero beat indicator. It can be assembled on a smaU PC board and 
mounted I'ji the converter compartment 



smaH 5-sided cube to cover the crystal out of 
thin sty ro foam packing material using air- 
plane cement or rubber cement to put it 
together and attach it to the board. The 
crystal will stDl run at room ambient, but 
small air currents won't cause *'eddy drift- 
ing." From there on^ it's only the patience 
you put into it. 

Any further help I can render^ please send 
SASE and your questions worded as best 
you can. Fortunately I work in a design job 
requiring n^y knowledge of this type TTL 
ICs daily, so 1 might be able to clear up 
problems arising from not knowing what 
makes TTL tick. I must say K20AW gave an 
excellent rundown on the use, care and 
feeding of TTL in the three articles. If you 
are planning any TTL project 1 whole- 
heartedly recommend reading them to keep 
out of trouble. Time and time again in my 
job I find TTL has more intelligent logic 
control than you or 1. By this I mean almost 
without fail it does exactly what it is 
commanded to do. In three years of working 
with them I have found only one IC defec- 
tive from the vendor using over-the-counter 
commercial grade (not mii-spec) devices. If 
you choose to save quite a bit by going 
through one of the many 73 Magazine 
advertisers listing TTL devices^ I can only 
speak from my own experience with the 
three I have tried to date. They have been 
excellent in quality and service, not to 



mention price. Incidentally, one of those 
sources yielded an SN 7473 that counts 
(divides) to a reliable 36 MHz. This means 
my basic low frequency part of the counter 
goes to 36 MHz, Use your best SN 7473 
(highest divide frequency) for IC-5. By all 
means try switching IC-5 and IC-21, since 
high speed in IC-21 doesn't buy you any- 
thing anyway. 

Only one comment should be added. The 
plus 5 volts can be 4.75 to 5.25V dc 
according to the manufacturer's data and 
you can still expect proper operation. Use a 
stiff and well regulated supply set to 4,9 to 
5.0V dc. Do not try running at over 5T V dc 
for any reason, as you are killing any margin 
of safety you have. At 4.75V dc and down 
the ICs faU to operate, but at 5,25 V dc and 
above the ICs may and usually do fail 
permanently. With 33 of them to worry 
about, the expense of a good supply is small. 
Several good "Crowbar*' circuits have ap- 
peared to shut things down in the event of 
too much current or voltage and I recom- 
mend the use of one of them. Also, as 
K20AW suggests, put in only one or a few 
ICs at a time and get sections of the counter 
going, rather than trying the "in one 
crunch" method. 

Have fun, and more important, thanks to 
Mr. Peter Stark, who has designed it, have a 
fine test instrument for a very reasonable fee. 

. . .W9CG1 



74 



73 MAGAZINE 



Terry C. Biosser WA8MLC 
735 Oakwood Avenue 
Lancaster OH 43130 





THE HAM'S 

SUMMER JOB? 



CT 



Like to get away from the city for a 
summer, to another part of the coun- 
try, perhaps? Imagine yourself operating 
your rig under fragrant pines on the edge 
of a crystal-clear lake in southern Maine, 
That was niy experience a couple of years 
ago, and it can be yours if you would enjoy 
teaching amateur radio at one of the 
numerous private camps located through- 
out the U-S. 

Camp directors are rapidly discovering 
that it pays to offer more to campers than 
standard athletic fare. With the boom of 
technology, parents are anxious to see their 
offspring getting into the act. And what is 
a more practical beginning than amateur 
radio? 

Getting in touch with these camps is 
your first objective. If youVe a student, 
college placement services can generally get 
you information. Many camps circulate 
their literature throughout U,S, campuses. 
The American Camping Association can 
give you assistance in getting a radio 
position, and ACA standards assure you of 
a reputable outfit. 

Most private camps operate on an eight- 
week summer and begin recruiting staff 
early in the spring. When interviewed for a 
radio counselor position, there are several 
important points to note. First of all, 
camps will generally require counselors to 
be at least 18 years of age, and most 
directors prefer staff over 2L Depending 
on how you present yourself, it's not too 
difficult for a director to forget the usual 
age preferences. Naturally you should have 
at least a General class ticket with a few 
years background in the technical end of 
the hobby. 




Foung camper with two transistor radio he built 
during the summer course. 



Directors are also concerned about how 
well you can organize and — most import- 
ant — instruct. Keep these things in mind 
when you interview and write letters of 
appUcation. 

During the interviewing process, it's 
important that you seek out information 
to insure your compatibility with the 
camp. Try to pin down the director's 
outlook and goals for the radio program. 
Get in touch with past radio counselors at 
the camp to discover their problems and 
what to expect from the campers and 
administration. Since the camp will prob- 
ably be too distant to visit, it's a good time 
to get opinions on such things as facilities, 
policies of the camp, and staff relations. 
Usually camp directors request critiques 
from specialty counselors at the end of a 
season, and it would be wise to obtain the 
latest report. 

When things are pretty well squared 
away between you and the director, there 



JUNE 1973 



75 



always exists the question of salary and 
expenses. Almost all private camps will give 
you a travel allowance that will cover 
ninety percent or better of your round trip 
if you travel frugally. Expect S50 to $100^ 
depending on how far you live from the 
camp. Many camp directors will allow you 
to suggest your salary requirements, and 
it*s one time you don't want to sell 
yourself short. Directors have difficulty 
finding qualified radio people, mainly be- 
cause they can be employed elsewhere at 
higher wages. They are willing to pay if 
they are impressed with you. Expect up- 
wards of $600 plus travel allowances. In 
addition* you"*!! receive free room and 
board and weekly laundry service. 

All reputable camps will present you 
with a contract outlining your wages and 
any additional duties to be assigned. Be 
sure to assert yourself to the director that 
you are a radio specialty counselor, and for 
the program to be successful, your radio 
duties must have priority. A less dynamic 
radio counselor will often find himself 
saddled with waterfront or athletic duties^ 
which are not that undesirable, but do 
detract from a successful radio program. 

You'll probably discover that the camp 
already owns some radio gear, and if you 
are lucky, maybe an SSB transceiver. Us- 
ually camps will have a healthy junk box 
and a supply of tools, soldering equipment, 
etc. Don't forget that you're going to need 
a key and a practice oscillator for code 
sessions. In addition, most camp directors 
would be happy to pay shipping charges on 
any personal gear that would enhance the 
program, A word of advice here: if you 
decide to ship any gear via any of the 
freight services, obtain a footlocker and use 
your spare clothing to pack it as tightly as 
possible. 

By now you probably know what anten- 
na system the camp has installed, but you 
may have to allow space in the footlocker 
for some coax and wire. It would also be 
wise to take along a small VOM and a few 
alligator clips. Perhaps the director by this 
time has forwarded an inventory to you to 
allow you a little more certainty of avail- 
able materials. Of course, you*ll want to be 
sure to. have a copy of the Handbook, and 



some of the 73 License Study Guides 
would be helpful I used both sources. The 
73 License Guides are excellent texts on 
which to base a course. 

Once you are there, it^s good advertising 
to arrange the shack as attractively as 
possible. This is for your convenience, that 
of the campers, and for the director's 
guests who are likely to appear during the 

summer. 

The overall programming at these pri- 
vate camps is designed to keep the chUdren 
'1n activity," This means that there may be 
four to six periods split between the 
morning and afternoon during which the 
campers are scheduled to, .or elect to, 
attend various activities. At this point, it's 
necessary that the director and program- 
ming personnel understand the academic 
nature of theory and Morse code sessions. 
Since radio is a relatively new thing at a lot 
of these camps, their tendency is to handle 
radio like any other activity. As anyone 
who has pursued a ham license would 
knoWj code and theory classes must be 
presented on a regular basis for best results. 

During the first week of camp, the 
object is to expose as many youngsters as 
possible to the lure of your activity. For 
the younger groups, the thrill of talking 
over the ham radio is certain to stimulate a 
likely chalk talk of what happened. The 
older fellows can generally get interested in 




The shack at camp, WA8MLG/1. The setup 
provided many thrilling demonstrations for the 
campers. 



76 



73 IVIAGAZINE 




View from the shack window. 



demonstrations. For example^ try using a 
small AM broadcast transmitter to transmit 
campers' voices to a radio. Following this^ 
the campers are inevitably curious to know 
why the things worked, which leads into a 
block-diagramming chalk talk- 

During the second week, you'll prob- 
ably be scheduled for the remaining groups 
and certain "optional periods" during 
which the campers may appear for addi- 
tional radio instruction. The second week 
is also an important one as far as youVe 
concerned. By now you'll be familiar with 
the aptitudes of the campers and be able to 
spot the shiny, excited eyes that betray a 
potential radio addict. Many boys will be 
inquiring about ham hcenses and practicing 
on their own the ten or so Morse code 
characters you've taught them. 

This is the crucial point that can make 
or break a good camp radio program. Many 
campers like to tinker with almost any- 
thing, and will add radio to their tinkering 
lists. Many of this genre will not be 
gung-ho about getting their amateur tick- 
ets, but will want to learn more about 
electronic gadgetry- The other variety of 
camper is generally the older group (and 
the non-athletic type) who go in for the 
challenge of the code and theory. As I 
discovered, it is necessary to divide these 
two different types for separate class ses- 
sions. Not only does it preserve your own 
sanity, but it permits more rapid learning 
and progress for the campers. 



mmm 




IDLANQ 

What do you get? A full '^ "^^ 

VMtts output power with 
automatic deviation con- 
trol, B-chanrref capa- 
bility with crystals in- 
stalled for J 6/.76, .34/ 
,94 and ,94/.94. Hi^ 
performance receiver 
with mechanical filters, 
IC and MOSFET front 
end. Built-in battery /S 
meter. Compact 9" x 3" 
X 1 7/8" size. Jacks for 
external speaker, micro- 
phone, antenna and 
charge/power< Operation 
on 8 ' AA" cells, ni^;ad 
battery pack or AC power 
$upply (optional). With 
carrying case, less bat- 
teries. Model 13-520, 

This and other 
leading ham 
equipment 
available at 

wectrodonicd 

I North: 



-S 




10349-59 S. Western Ave. 
Chicago, m. 60643 
<312) 233-8034 



^ South: 
106 E, Washington St, 
Momence, m. 60954 
(815) 472-6610 




SEND FOR FREE CA TALOGUE 





Identifier $65 

The CWID-50 provides precisely timed 
automatic CW ID. The heart of the unit is a factory 
programmed IC; no more cumbersome diode ma- 
trices. The CWID-50 comes ready to instatl with 
preset parameters (user may adjust): code speed 
— 20 wpm, ID inten/al— 3 min, audio frequency— 
1020 Hz, initial delay- 750 msec. The CWID-50 
will bring up the repeater for fihal ID after last use. 
This is ttie smallest most versatile, lowest price 
CW identifier on the market I To order yours, 
give call sign and whether you desire 'de^ Enclose 
$65 and we pay postage, or remit $10 and pay 
balance COD. FuBy guaranteed for one year We 
also have CWIDs for other appications. Write us 
for more information. For a phone demonstration or 
to reserve a CWD caJI Barbara: (303)-794-7234, 



JUNE 1973 




COMTmOL SiGfiML COmPAfiY 

5964 W. Columbia PlJD^ivef, Colorado 80227 



When you do this pen and paper jug- 
gling act, there are a couple of things to 
consider. When you request such a separa* 
tion for the program, you'll be tampering 
with the administration's programming, 
which at ^ome camps is considered sacred. 
Secondly, by this time you should have 
some idea of construction projects in mind 
for the groups. You'll discover that con- 
struction projects are almost a necessity. 
After school's out for the summer^ most 
campers balk at a continual diet of lectures 
and demonstrations. They want to do 
things with their hands, something elec- 
tronic that is workable. So, in addition to 
* the two lecture groups, you'll need two lab 
sessions, or at least one separate lab for the 
advanced group. 

Projects are a consideration in them- 
selves. For the first group, simple transistor 
radio kits make a nice project when several 
weeks are taken to explain and construct 
them. It's the leam-as-you-build approach 
that retains their interest. The licensing 
classes will probably want to try their 
hands at more advanced things like trans- 
mitter or receiver kits. My star pupU did a 
beautiful job of the Heath HW-16 Novice 
transceiver. It's also a time for the counse- 
lor to recognize his own technical limita- 
tions. 

After all this is on paper, pack up your 
wit and persuasion and present it to the 
administration. Assuming you can be guar- 
anteed definite scheduling for your groups, 
the next bugaboo is projects. These are 




Camper with his compieted HW-J6. 



generally ordered from any radio supply 

house by phone for fast delivery, with 

simultaneous financial arrangements with 

the parents. Out of twenty boys in my 

group, the parents of only one thought the 

camper couldn't complete a project. As I 

mentioned before, parents are pleased to 
see their children dabbling in electronics. 

As far as teaching the program, it's 
largely up to your own doing. The basic 
radio group will enjoy demonstrations and 
lectures on simplified theory in addition to 
their lab. This group will probably shape 
the course themselves, with the variety of 
questions you wUl have to field. In the 
licensing classes, it's necessary that it be 
disciplined enough so that Novice examina- 
tions can be given during the last week of 
camp* 

As far as licensing procedures go, it is 
wise to give the FCC three weeks to handle 
your 610 forms and volunteer examiner 
certification. If you are under 21, the 
ARRL win be glad to supply you with a 
few addresses of qualified hams near the 
camp. Write them all, explaining the situ a- 
tion J and invite any takers over for lunch 
on the day of the exam. 1 wrote to three 
amateurs and all three responded affirma- 
tively, and 1 had the awkward pleasure of 
refusing two. It only testifies to the help- 
fulness of the radio fraternity. 

In addition to your radio program, you 
can expect much more from the summer. 
You'll probably be assigned ''bunk duty" 
which means you'll share bunk supervision 
with another staffer over ten or so campers 
of the same age group. I found bunk duty 
to be a great break from the shack and a 
fine experience in learning about chOdren 
and helping them to grow. You*li probably 
be asked to help set up a PA system 
occasionally, and maybe even operate a 
movie projector. There's still plenty of 
time to enjoy waterfront and sports activi- 
ties in addition to evening ragchews with 
the gang back home. On your one day off 
per week J you are free to tour the sur- 
rounding countryside. Above all, the letters 
you'll receive later on from your summer 
camp boys will put the icing on the cake. 
Have a good summer, and good luck! 

.. .WA8MLG 



78 



73 MAGAZINE 





John J. Scbuitz W2EEY 
1829 Cornelia Street 
Brooklyn NY 11227 



COAXIAL AN 



NNA 



A simple antenna form that provides essentially ine same 
performance characteristics as a folded dipole antenna 
but ivith direct coaxial-line feed requiring no hahins 
or other matching devices 



The folded dipole antenna is one of the 
most popular antenna forms used by ama- 
teurs. This is still true tod ay , although the 
folded dipole has declined a bit in popularity 
over that which it enjoyed in the 19SOs. The 
reason for the decUne in popularity is 
undoubtedly due to the fact that the usual 
folded dipole cannot be directly fed with a 
coaxial transmission line. The usual half- 
wave folded dipole constructed of 300O 
twinlead must be fed with 30011 transmis- 
sion line and a balun used at the output of a 
transmitter having a 50*7512 coaxial output, 
or the antenna can be fed with coaxial 
transmission line and a balun transformer 
used at the antenna. In either case, a certain 
amount of inconvenience and expense is 
involved. Some amateurs simply do not want 
to add the necessary components to the 
antenna system and settle for the use of a 
simple dipole which can be directly fed with 
a coaxial transmission line. 

Anyone who has ever used a folded 
dipole, however, will usually notice the 
difference in performance between a folded 
dipole and a simple dipole. The folded 
dipole antenna has a much broader band- 
width and far less retuning of a transmitter is 
required as frequency changes are made 
within a band. On the higher frequency 
bands especially, one can often QSY across 
the entire CW or phone portion of a band 
without having to touch the output tuning 
on a transmitter (assuming a relatively low Q 
transmitter output circuit). 

Also tied in with its bandwidth character- 
istics, the folded dipole seems to be far less 
sensitive to its physical placement effecting 
its swr. Thus a folded dipole can be put up 



in many situations where the antenna legs 
must be bent or otherwise not run in a 
straight line and still perform well, A regular 
dipole erected in a similar situation may well 
have to be carefuUy pruned to work well on 
a narrow portion of a band. Sometimes 
operators who use a folded dipole after 
having used a simple dipole claim that the 
folded dipole performs better. This is usually 
only true because the simple dipole was not 
carefully matched to begin with, or the 
relatively severe frequency bandwidth limita- 
tion of a simple dipole made of thiii wire 
was not fuUy realized. 

After the above discussion^ the reader 
may expect that the antenna to be described 
in this article is some new form of folded 
dipole. That is actually not the case, al- 
though the antenna described does have the 
performance characteristics of a folded di- 
pole but with a direct coaxial transmission 
line feed. It basically adapts the desirable 
features of the folded dipole antenna form 
to the present day almost universal use of 
coaxial transmission lines without requiring 
the use of any impedance matching devices. 
The antenna form described dates back to at 



HFEETJ* 



46g 



\Ju-^ -jfcr^ 




SHIELDS NOT 
CONNECTED 



NO, iZ WIA€ OR 
COAX FNNER 
CONpgCTOfI 



I> 



50 a COA* to 
TRANSMITTER 



Fig. I, Basic dimensions of the double-coax anten^ 
na. 



JUNE 1973 



79 



m 



least WW II days but then most transmitters 
had balanced outputs and a regular folded 
dipole was a more convenient antenna form 
to use. 

The basic dimension of the double-coax 
dipole is shown in Fig. L Note that the 
shield of each coaxial line section in the 
antenna flat-top is connected to the inner 
conductor only at the outer end of each 
section. TTie shield of each coaxial line 
section at the center of the antenna is not 
connected to the inner conductor, but only 
to the coaxial transmission line, 

The electrical operation of the antenna 
may not be apparent at first glance but it is 
basically simple. If one forgets for the 
moment that each coaxial section in the 
antenna flat-top has an inner conductor, it 
wUl be seen that the shield of each section 
and the wire extension at the outer end of 
each section form together a simple dipole 
antenna. Considering then the inner con- 
ductor of each coaxial section, each coaxial 
section forms a shorted stub placed across 
the dipole terminals. Since each stub is less 
than 0,25X long, it produces an inductive 
reactance- As shown in Fig. 2, the reactance 
of the shorted stub varies as its effective 
length varies with frequency and the reac- 
tance at the antenna terminals of a simple 



t/Zk 



— v>/<^ — 



U) 



<i/Mk 






\Ma 



1 



<J O 



OPEN 



3 



(B) 



-o cP 



Fig, 2. Basic operation of antenna depends on fact 
that slightly shorter than l^X antenna (A) presents 
cap aci live terminal reactance whiie slightly shorter 
than J4X shorted stub (B) can present compensating 
inductive reactance. 



dipole vary with frequency as the effective 
length of the antenna changes. The overall 
result is that over a broad portion of each 

band, the reactances cancel each other and 
the input impedance of the antenna remains 
essentially constant. This is true because the 
resistive portion of the antenna impedance 
varies in value slower around the resonant 
frequency of the dipole than does the 
reactive component of the impedance. 

Construction 

The antenna can usually be constructed 
without the use of any special materials. It is 
not necessary to use tlie same type of 
coaxial cable for the stubs in the flat-top 
portion of the antenna as is used for the 
transmission line. Usually, however, it will 
be convenient to do so. In any case, a 5 Oil 
coaxial tranmission line should be used to 
feed the antenna. 

The center connector for the antenna can 
be a coaxial tee if care is taken to insulate 
the necessary portions of the antenna. That 
is, the shield of one of the coaxial sections in 
the flat-top will have to be insulated from 
the coaxial connector going into the tee and 
connected via an external wire lead to the 
center conductor of the coaxial transmission 
Une which feeds the antenna. The center pin 
of the coaxial connector used for the coaxial 
transmission line into the tee connector also 
has to be removed. 

An alternative to the use of a tee connec- 
tor is to simply construct a center connector 
using a small piece of 3 x 3 in. Bakelite, or 
similar insulating material, as ^own in Fig. 
3. Simple hardware store U-clamps are used 
to hold each coaxial line section in place. 
Once the connector is constructed and 
wired, it should be thoroughly covered with 
a good coating of insulating varnish both to 
prevent the hardware components from rust- 
ing and to prevent moisture from entering 
the exposed ends of the coaxial lines. The 
use of this type of connector does not 
r^uire that the length of coaxial line used in 
the flat-top portion of the antenna be cut in 
the middle in two pieces. Thus, the flat-top 
portion of the antenna gains added mechani- 
cal strength. 

Figure 1 shows the end sections of the 
antenna flat-top as single pieces of wire. This 



80 



73 MAGAZINE 



— 3 ^ J 3 « INSULATED 
M*TtftiAL fBAitELiTE^ 
f^^Ii&LASS, ETC- J 



OtEl-ECtlTiC OF 
COAXijaj^ CABLE 
K£f|T£n C044C>UCTOn 
flOT CUTJ 




CCMTER COWOUCTOR 
SOLOEftfC) TO SHIELD 



SHIELDS 
SOLDERED 

"U" CLAMP 
O^ER CABLE 
JACKET 



Fig, 3. Simple home-brew center connector for 
antenna easily interconnects coaxial lines. FinMied 
assembly should be weather protected mth var- 
ni^» 



type of construction will suffice for opera- 
tion over almost all of every high-frequency 
band except 80m. The swr will generally be 
less than 1.5:1 over a band, if some addi- 
tional "peaking up'' is desired to optimize 
the swr in some portion of a band, this can 

be done by varying the length of the end 
sections. GeneraUy, this procedure is not 
necessary nor will it provide any worthwhile 
improvement. For maximum bandwidth on 
80m, the end sections can be made from a 
"fan" of several wires joined together at the 
points where the coaxial sections are 
shorted. The center wire in the "fan" should 
have the length of the single wire end section 
as calculated from Fig. L 



Summary 

It would be nice to claim that the 
antenna form presented is a new one. Such is 
not the case, however, although the antenna 
will be new to many amateurs and should 
solve many of the operational problems 
encountered with simple wire dipole anten- 
nas. Certainly for the expense of a bit of 
extra coaxial hne, anyone about to construct 
a single-band dipole antenna should seriously 
consider the advantages of the doublenjoax 
antenna. 

...W2EEY 




m 



d 



I 



^ 




'€d 



$150 



1 



i 



po.stpaid 




r 

I 

I 
t 

I 

I 
I 
I 



This new 73 book, bj W2WRD/1, 
gives you the basics of 2 m FM 
Operation. . .and gets you on FM 
quickly and easily. A fast reading of 
'*How To Use FM*' can help you 
avoid beginners* pitfalls. . .opens 
the door to a world of fun and 
friendly people. Order your copy 
today with the coupon below! 

73 Magazine, Peterborough NH 03458 



. Please rush 



■1 




Enclosed is $ 

copies (@ $1.50) of "How To Use 
FM" to: 



I 



I Name, 



I 
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Address 
City 



State ZiD_ 



6-73 





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73 Magazint%1*elerborough NH 03458 



Enclosed is S, 



. Please msh 



copies (^, $1.50) of the 1973 FM 
Repeater Atlas to: 

Na me 



Address 
City 



State 



.Zip 











postpaid 



Complete upto-date list of repeaters 
for the entire world! Maps pinpoint 
U.S. and Canadian repeaters and all 
listings contain call, location, fre- 
quency and access requirements. The 
Atlas features a concise hii^tory of 2ni 
FM repealers and a section on How 
To Use Repeaters by W2NSD/1. If 
youVe using repeaters now ... if 
youVe planning to join the fun on 
FM . . . you need this book nowl Send 
the coupon in today* 



6-73 



AN 




Curtis Hoffman WIELU 
J 69 Milham Street 
Marlboro MA 01752 



RA-RELABLE 



NON-FALSING 



TON 




COD 




Once a simple repeater has been con- 
structed and debugged it is quite 
natural to consider the addition of extra 
receivers, autopatch, etc. To graduate froqj 
the simple single receiver transmitter to a 
complex and sophisticated machine is bas- 
ically quite simple. The basic holdup in my 
experience is a simple foolproof method of 
controlling ^'extras" in an advanced repeater 
from the car or base station. The first and 
most sensible method of remote control is of 
course in band signaling or tone control, 
Basic problems exist with this inasmuch as 
users' voices, touch tone dialing of auto- 
patch units, etc. contain frequencies in the 
*%i band" (300-3000 Hz band). When 
voices, noise or other undesirable short term 
energy falls in the pass band of the decoder, 
unwanted tripping of control circuits occurs. 
This problem, which is quite real, can cause 
serious control difficulties to the home- 
designed and some of the commercially 
available decoders. Other problems such as 
temperature^ unstable frequency deter- 
mining elements, critical input level adjust- 
ments, high Q LC, ringing problems, etc. 
discourage most people from ever even 
thinking about tone control for repeater or 
other voice channel operation. As black as 
the tone control picture appears from above, 
useable and very reliable control can be 
utilized by careful design and the use of 
modern micro circuits. 



The circuit to be described is a design 
which has been in use in many amateur 
repeaters, fire department radio control of 
town sirens, and call up of auxiliaiy firemen. 
The heart of the decoder is a recently 
available micro circuit, a Signetics NE 567* 
Within its little 8 pin DIP body lies approxi- 
mately 60 transistors. They function as a 
highly stable phase locked loop with detec- 
tion and logic output circuitry. Frequency 
and bandwidth are independently adjustable 
externally. With the pot shown between pins 
5 and 6 of the NE 567 the frequency is 
adjustable between 500 and 3000 Hz. The 
internal oscillator is avaUabie at pin 5 so 
decode frequency can be set very accurately 
with the use of a digital counter. Pin 8 
provides an output transistor from the de- 
coder; when a signal is being decoded, the 
output transistor conducts turning off QL 
The 270K resistor and 2 fJiF capacitor form a 
time constant of approximately 1 second. 
With Ql off, the C charges. If and only if the 
decoded tone remains for 1 second will the 
voltage in the 2 |L(F reach the firing point of 
Q2, a unijunction. If the tone does not 
remain for a fuU second, the output transis- 
tor in the NE 567 turns off and in turn Ql 
conducts, discharging very rapidly the 2 ^F 
capacitor. Using this method of non Unear 
integration, transients, voice peaks^ etc, can- 
not trip the decoder. A steady frequency 
stable tone of 1 second duration is all that 



JUNE 1973 



83 



■] ( O DECODE IN 




^ RESET 



ffiLAY Rm 
EXTERNAL USE 



Fjg. L Schematic, Ml trazmstors 2N3 8 59 A unless specified otherwise. 



can fire Q2. Wlicn Q2 fires, it pulses the base 
of Q3 which with Q4 forms a flip-flop, Q3 
conducts causing Q4 to open, A time con- 
stant formed by the 10k, 500k pot and the 
47 mF capacitor will then begin to charge. 
When the firing point of QS, another uni- 
junction, is reached a pulse will be delivered 
to the base of Q4 resetting the flip-flop to its 
original state. If the COR input to Q 8 is 
made positive any time during the charging 
of the 47 fJF capacitor it will be dumped 
very quickly and will not allow the fUp-flop 
to be reset by the unijunction. In this way, a 
function can be "toned'' in and kept in 
operation until no COR is produced by the 
repeater or other device for a set period of 
1—30 seconds. If a function is to be kept on 
(or off) by the decoder, pin 6 can be 
grounded J thus not aUowing the reset timer 
to work. Pins 3 and 4 provide normally open 
contacts that close when tone is decoded. 

These contacts will open when reset timer 
resets the flip-flop or Q4 collector is ground* 
ed by external means. Q6 is an emitter 
follower providing low impedance tone out- 
put from the NE 567 chip- This output can 
be used to encode another unit similar to the 



one described, such as mobile to mobile tone 
burst applications. 

Another use for this feature being put 
into use locally is to control voice coil 
connections with the relay RLYl so that 
base station monitoring of a crowded re- 
peater channel is endurable. When someone 
wishes to communicate with a so equipped 
station, a 1 second tone burst is all that is 
required to open the speaker. Using the 
timed turn off option, messages can be left 
on a tape recorder via a repeater without 
using excessive tape. One of these decoders 
was recently put into use to access an 
autopatch on a small private repeater. This 
provided a quickly constructed full auto- 
patch hookup for a group that did not want 
to get involved with large *^open" repeaters. 

These boards completely assembled and 
tested are available from Hoffman 
Electronics, 169 MiUham Street, Marlboro 
MA 01 752. The cost including postage with- 
in the U.S. is $35,00, No COD's, I think 
you'll find this decoder circuit a joy to use 
and as indispensable in repeater operation as 
"CORV 

.. .WIELU 



m 



73 MAGAZINE 



J. L. Iliffe VE3CES 

1159 Flagship Drive 
Misdssauga, Ontario 

Canada 



AN AMPLIFIED, 

CALIBRATED, SIGNAL 
STRENGTH METER 



Tune quads, coils, mobile whips^ all sorts of 
things with this simple reset table device. 



Recently, I had the problem of tuning a 
four element quad. As you may or 
may not be aware, these beasties are sup- 
posed to be tuned from the rear for mini- 
mum signal. A quick check showed none of 
my friends had a signal strength meter, so I 
prepared to degrade myself and buy one. A 
look at a few prices convinced me to build, 

Since I wanted some other information 
on the quad, like front to back ratio and the 
effect of more or fewer elements, I decided 
to add a cahbrated attenuator and enough 
gain to make a fairly wide input range. It 
also had to be cheap? 

The result is shown in Fig. I . 




I&OK 



[OK 



47K 



Fig, 1 . Diagram of the field strength meter. 

To use the normal rf attenuator method 
of switched T-pads requires complicated 
shields and quite a few resistors. Also the 



attenuator has to be terminated in its charac- 
teristic impedance to read correctly. To 
bypass this problem 1 first detect the rf, then 
attenuate the dc. This has the added advan- 
tage that the circuit is no longer frequency 
sensitive. 

The incoming rf is tuned by C1-L2. CI 
can be any small variable. I used both 
sections of a dual 15 pF because my local 
surplus store has them for 60^, For VHP use 
only 1 section. 

L2 is wound on a plastic pill bottle about 
1" in diameter and tapering to 7/8". To 
cover 13-24 MHz, I used 11 turns spaced 
over about an inch. LI is 2 turns over top of 
L2. I tried bands witching with another pill 

bottle fastened on the other side of the 
shield from L2- The idea was to bandswitch 
another frequency range but I find it more 
convenient to wind on coils as needed. Use 
the grid dipper to get you in the ballpark- I 
have used this meter as high as 72 MHz 
without trouble. Dl can be any diode. I used 
a 1N34 because I could then specify it and 
know it would work, but I tried a computer 
type which also worked. If you prefer the 
meter to peak rather than dip, reverse D 1 . 

Rectified rf from Dl is put on the top of 
Rl, the calibrated attenuator. R2 in series 
with Rl gives the dB point at its junction. 
For a 30 dB range, R2 is 47K if Rl is 1 MQ 
This doesn't quite fill the range but is close • 
Changing the value of R2 will change the 



JUNE 1973 



85 



SPECIAL 73 CRYSTAL BANK 
GIFT SUBSCRIPTION OFFER 

Provide one full year of enjoyment for a friend 
with a year's subscription to 73 Magazme — all 
in exchange for the instgnif icant sum of $2 and 
one of your unused two meter FM crystals. 

The following berif ft i& wtW accrue frcxn ihi$ exchanger 

1. you )m\\ soon have « \ot more good fnefxls as lArord ^ets out that 
you 4re9ivingaw9V sulncripiions to 73. 

2. 73 wtll have a fot more new readers amateMr5 who wnll hopetyUv 
become p^vchorogicaily dcpendern upon the magajtine and r&rmw at 
the end of \ht q\H ¥**r at ihe regular aitiscnprion rate thereby 
eveniuaMv making ihti dea^l iivorthwhile for 73. 

3. Vqu Will have a w^v to gel nd of all those civsTats ttiat have been 
kicking sround afttf reiieaters have chariged channels^ gr ^qu have 
fnov«tt U^m <MV« r«peat0r area to another. 

4. 73 will bujid u^p a crvstal bank for whatever devift^ purpose they 
may have in mirtd whether it be rental of crystals for amateurs on 
tnpi or pefh,^! even the ouirighl sale of them. They might even 
cooli u& some sort of sitbwriouon premiifm arrBngement. You fisvm 
know. 

WHAT VOUSEND! 



t. The name and address, incfuding call t^^tiers and I'tp, of the friend 
to be efidowed w*th Ihe gift 5uh«:riptton to 73. It you send this m by 
iune 30lh, they #)Ould ftart thetf subscription with the August i^sue. 
This offer is v«lid for netv sMb^riptions oniy. not *Of renewals or 
extensions. For $2 we can't stop and look them up in the compiiter 
to see if they are already tn there. 

2. Send S2 in cash, check, money order, IRC's. or anything 
negotiable tor each gift subscription. 

2. Tlpe each crysTat to a 3 x 5 card arid mark on the card this data: 
make of s^t th^ crystal was made for - transmit or receive freqi^ency 
Your name, address, and call on the card In case the crystal is n 
bummer, m which case we'll need another on^, or S4 to buy a rm'<.^' 
one lo replace it in the crystal bank. Crystals for the following 
1 rartsceivers are acceptable: Clegg, Drake, Genave, Gladding, 
Inouedcom). Grove, Pearce-Stmpson, Ross and White, SBE, Simp 
$ion, Sonar, Standard, Swan, Telecomm, Tempo, Varitromcs, Ye-esu, 
Use enough tape lo hold rhe crystal to the card, but please do nol 
overdo itl 



HELP! Send for FREE list of 

over 200 pieces good used 

equipment. Priced to 

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range but 30 dB is considerably more than 
the F/B ratio of most beams, 

Ql is a 2N5033 FET. The high input 
impedance of Ql allows us to set the 
calibration of Rl directly by dc voltage 
measurements on the VTVM since it does 
not draw any base (gate) current. It is a 
p-channel device. If you use an n-channel 
type you will have to change the entire 
biasing of the circuit and also reverse DL 

Q2 and Q3 form a differential amplifier 
to drive the meter, Q2 is necessary to avoid 
loading Q 1 ^id I had quite a bit of trouble 
balancing the meter against batteiy volta^ 
changes until I added Q3. It will now 
operate from 8.5—9.2 volts with no trouble. 
The lOK pot in Q3*s base centers the meter. 
The meter I used is a 250 fiA tuning meter 
with no markings on it except a red/white/ 
blue bar. This is all you need since we 
calibrate on Rl, not the meter. 

Operation 

The meter is quite sensitive and with a 
two foot antenna I could get a reading 
several hundred feet behind my quad at 60 
watts input. First tune the input (which is 
quite sharp) with the attenuator set at zero. 
This is the least sensitive position. Now set 
the meter for a convenient reading near the 
center scale with the incoming signal stUl on 
using R3. Adjust your antenna. When you 
feed it power again the reading will not be 
quite on scale on the meter but turning up 
Rl will allow you to put the meter back to 
the original position. Do not touch R3. The 
reading on Rl is now the increased gain in 
dB needed to bring the signal back to its 
original strength. In other words, the de- 
crease in signal strength. 

Note that during measurements you need 
a received signal to use Rl. With no signal 
the meter will be off scale. 

I have also used the meter to align 
oscOlalors and doublers in my two meter 
receiver. A probe can be made for this from 
two turns of wire on the end of a piece of 
coax. The high gain available allows the 
pickup loop to be quite far away which 
reduces detuning. Adjustments show up well 
on the meter. 

. . .VE3CES 



86 



73 MAGAZINE 



Paul L. Rinaldo K4YKB 

1524 Springvah Avenue 
McLean, VA 22101 



NICKEL-CADMIUM 

BATTERY PACK 

FOR PORTABLE FM 



The nickel-cadmium battery pack 
described in this article was designed to 
match my two meter transceiver. This home 
brew project was undertaken to equip the 
transceiver for portable operation in the 
field away from the car or ac power. The 
construction mainly involves cutting and 
bending sheet aluminum. The entire project 
can be completed in about three or four 
evenings. 

Considerations 

My unit is a 12-channel, solid state FM 
transceiver capable of 10 watts of rf output* 
My transceiver case measures about SVi" x 
8" X IVi" and it weighs about SVi lbs. It 
operates to full specifications at 13.8V dc 
and gracefully degrades as the voltage is 
decreased- Measured current requirements 
are 2.5 A transmit, 220 mA standby and an 
average of about 220 mA receive. 

OveraE, the electrical characteristics of 
the unit lend themselves to battery opera- 
tion, except for the relatively high battery 
drain in the receive and standby conditions. 
The drain can be reduced by about 120mA 
by switching off the pilot lamps. 



The station junk box was the source of 
10 size D nickel-cadmium ceils which were 
saved for such an occasion. These cells are 
mounted in a plastic "egg crate" measuring 
IVi'' X V X, 2W\ Fortunately, the plastic 




Photo 1. Bottom view of transceiver and nickel 
cadmium battery pack. 



JUNE 1973 



87 



container proved lo be a perfect fit for the 
outline dimensions of the transceiver. The 
same is true for F cells which have the same 
diameter as the D cell but are somewhat 
longer. The capacity of a nickel-cadmium F 
cell is 6.5 Ah at the 5-hour discharge rate, 
while that of the smaller D cell is 4.0 Ah. 
Although the larger F ceils were preferred, 
none could be located at low or no cost. So 
the D cells were used, 

Construction 

The basic box is constructed of 0.063- 
ijich thick sheet aluminunL The top consists 
of a sheet folded at right angles \W^ from 
each end to match the top of the transceiver 
cabinet. The length of the top is 3Vi". 

The bottom of the battery box i^ some- 
what difficult to form using tools available 
to the amateur. So, after some experiment- 
ing, I elected to cut the top and bottom 
covers so that they just meet. The joint was 
made by mounting a 3W x 3/4" aluminum 
strip mside the seam. The bottom of the 
strip is secured to the bottom cover by 
means of two aluminum rivets. The top of 
the strip is joined to the top cover with two 
small metal screws. Like the top cover, the 
bottom cover is cut to a length of 3/2''. The 
difficulty with the bottom cover is bending 
the corners to match the transceiver outline. 
The start and finish of each bend were first 
determined by measuring the transceiver 
bottom cover by making pencil marks on 
masking tape* These marks were then trans- 
ferred to the aluminum sheet to be bent. 
Numerous slight bends were then made 
between these marks until the originaJ bend 
was virtually matched. An aluminum break 
was used. An expedient is to use a bench 
vice and several pieces of hard wood. 

The back cover of the battery box (not 
shown in the pictures) is a flat sheet of 
aluminum with the comers rounded to 
conform to the outline of the case. The back 
cover is secured by 4 machine screws that 
mate with nutplates riveted to the top and 
bottom covers. 

The front panel is formed from sheet 
aluminum cut to size. The four comers are 
cut off diagonally, and the last 1/2" margins 
on all sides are folded at right angles. A 
chassis receptacle and guide pin are mounted 



on the front panel to mate with the rear 
panel of the transceiver. The battery box 
front panel is secured to the top and bottom 
covers by four metal screws. 

The plastic ''egg crate'* needs to be cut 
down on two of its corners to conform to 
the rounded corners of the bottom cover of 
the battery case. A power drill and sanding 
disc can be used. Depending on the length of 
the metal screws used to complete the seam 
between the top and bottom covers, it may 
be necessary to cut an additional groove on 
each end of the **egg crate," When the 
batteries are inserted and the battery box is 
assembled, the *'egg crate" is held securely 
around the edges by the folded margins of 
the front panel and the nutplates used to 
mount the back cover. 

Fmishing 

After the aluminum work is finished, the 
corners and edges should be filed smooth. 
Emery cloth is used to remove any scratches, 
and a buffer may then be used if one is 
available. Before painting, it is important to 
remove all dirt and grease. This is best done 
by taking the aluminum parts to a shop with 
anodizing or other suitable finishing pro cess • 
A fair substitute is to clean the aluminum 
with alcohol. After the aluminum is cleaned ^ 
it should not be touched with the hands and 
should be painted as soon as possible. 

A search of the local paint stores and a 
few random inquiries failed to tum up an 
answer on how to match tht paint used on 
my rig. Apparently, it is a sputtered semi- 
gloss epoxy enamel. Rather than to prolong 
the search, black wrinkle varnish was used 




Photo 2, Nickel-cadimum battery pack with front 

panei open to show individual cells in their plastic 
**egg crate," 



88 



73 MAGAZINE 



]> 




battery box. Suitable catches are somewhat 
hard to find in the usual electronics or 
hardware stores. The catches used were from 
someone else^s junkbox, and their origin is 
unknown. 



Photo 3. Nickel-cadmium battery pack front pane! 
showing 6'pin "Jones'* receptacle and guide pin. 



on all parts of the battery box except for the 
front panel. The painted parts were baked in 
a 250 oven for 15 minutes, 

Following the painting, four rubber bum* 
pers (feet) are riveted to the bottom cover. 
Rivets are used because the "egg crate'' does 
not leave enough room for the nut and screw 
normally supplied with the bumpers. 

Wiring of the receptacle is simple. Heat- 
shrinkable tubing is used to cover each 
solder connection. 

The final touches are the addition of the 
guide pin and catches on the sides of the 



Charging 

Nickel-cadmium D cells (when fully dis- 
charged) should be charged for 14 hours at a 
constant-current rate of 400 mA. When 
discharged, the voltage is about 1.0 to 1.1 
volt per cell- Near the end of its charging 
cycle, the voltage is 135 to 1.45 volt per 
cell. After settling down after a charge, the 
voltage should be nominally 1.25 volt per 
ceil. If you have one in the shack, a dc bench 
supply with voltage and current meters can 
do a nice job of charging nickel-cadmium 
batteries. Or, a small battery charger could 
be built from available parts. 

An ac power supply can be used as a 
constant-voltage charger for the nickel- 
cadmium batteries. When the battery is_ 
initially placed on charge, the charging cur- 
rent is high. The current tapers to a trickle as 
the battery approaches end of charge. 



f 



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Sub-Audibie tone 




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Compatible with a\l sub-audible torie systems such as 
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Glass epoKv PCB's & siFKion xstrs throughout. 

Any reeds except special dual coil tyfjes may be used 
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All are powered by 1 2 vdc, 

U^ on any tone frequency 67 Hz to 250 Hz 

Small size 1.5 x 4 x ,75*' 

All parts included except reed vnd reed socket 

Postpaid — Calif, residents add 5% sales tax 

COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS 

P.O. Box 153 Brea CA 92621 



AN/GRR-5 RECEIVER 

%3 to 18 MHi in 4 Bands. AM. CW md 
MCW, cootinuous tuning &. 10 pre-set 
frequencies, 20O kHr crystal calibrator, 
4' P.M. speaker, 12 tubes, with power 
supply for 11B V. 50/60 eye., 6, 12 or 
24 V. DC - Also dry cells 90 St 1.5 V. 
DC. Size 13V/' n B%" jc 12%." Shpg. 
Wt.: 75 lbs. USED. fcparaWe , . t^SBQ 
CHECKED .$S9.&0 Power Plug; $2.CKI 
Manu3i..$7,50 



R-392 RECEIVER - 500 mz to 32 mhi, 32 

Sands. 25 Tubes, 24/28 V. DC Size; \^%:l x 14" x 11": 70 lbs. 
US£D. reparablei $295. CHECKED: S350. Manual: $6.50 

All Prices F,O.B., Uma, Ohio - Dept 73 

SB/\/D FOR OUR BIG NEW CA TA L OGf 




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JUNE 1973 



89 




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ACTIVE AUDIO FILTERS 

ICS FOR SUPER HIGH PERF0RT?W7JC£ 

CW FILTER (CWF 2) GeT rdzor 
shafp selecifviiy; No imptdance 
maiching' BW fsdeciabiej SO Hi. 
no Hi. 180 Hz: Center 
fr«3uerKv F-760 Hi; Skim 60 
db dortTT. at %F and 2F; 4 op 
stf^y 2" x3" PC boafti: S14.95 
wir«d, tested, guaranteed. 

SI 2-95 kit. CttF*/: 5*12.95 Kit, il4.S& VVIftED 

CW mm FILTER tCWF 3) V^"vi2" PC board; Center frequencv F = 7B0 
Hz; 30 db down Pt VaF and 2F; 8W 110 Hz. 2 op &mps; S3.95 wired, 
tested, guaranteed: S7.95 kit. 

LOW PASS FILTiR (LfF 1J Resistqrt s*t cutoff 500 Hz to 20 KHz: 
Factory set to 23 KHz: RaElofJ 48 db per octave; Input imp 1 M; 6ain=l; 
5 op ampi; 2"Jt3" PC board; S 16.95 wired, tested, guaranteed: S 14.95 kit. 

• • ■ "please include 55^ pcjstage oi* all orders" * * * 

WRITE FOR FREE SPEC SHE£TSf f I 

P,0, Box 494 C 
Miss. Slate, Ms 39762 



MFJ ENTERPRISES 



Isolated - Pad - Drill ^ Mill 

Prectsion circuii board const rue tron 

without etching. Fit* hand drill, electric 

drill, "Yankee" screwdriver. Simple, fast, 

economical, safe Sizes: .2&0, J 60 Dia. 

$6.50 ea. 
Calif, residents add 5%. 



A F STAHLER Co 

PO BOX 354 CUPERTINO. CALIF ftsOU 





SORNEIJ 



tube 



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48 Pgv New Items IN LOTS Of 100 '« ?^ HOURS' 

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Kjhfl ORDEfl FRtE 

IF NOT SNIPPED 
IN LOTS or 100 'N ?4 HOURS' 



WORLD QSL BUREAU 

5200 Psnami Am., Richmond CA USA 94804 

THE ONLY QSL BUREAU to handia ell of 
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SPACE-AGE TV CAMERA KITS & PLANS 

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VibropleX 




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833 Broadway* 
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Switching Lamps Off 

Because the two pilot lamps used in the 
transceiver draw about 120 mA, it is de- 
sirable to eliminate this drain when operat- 
ing from batteries, A ground rule for the 
switching scheme was that this be a **no 
holes" modification to maintain the resale 
value of the transceiverp After some thought^ 
a magnetic proximity reed switch was 
chosen. An SPOT type was selected and 
wired so that the lamps would be normally 
on. The reed switch is mounted on a smaU 
aluminum bracket and is located immedi- 
ately behind the front panel just below the 
panel meter. To turn off the lamps a bar 
magnet is placed over that section of the 
front paneL Some rubber cement helps the 
magnet stay in place yet leaves no perma- 
nent residue* 

If you have never worked with magnetic 
reed switches, a word of caution is in order. 
If you plan to bend the leads, long-nose 
pliers should be used to hold the wire to 
provide some relief to the delicate glass 
envelope. 

Results 

In theory, if you use the battery on an 
80/10/10% (standby/receive/transmit) basis, 
the power required for one hour of opera- 
tion should be as follows: 
48 min, 80% standby (,8h x .08 A) = 0.64 Ah 
6min, 10% receive (.Ih x .10A) = 0.01 Ah 
6 min, 10% transmit (Jh x 2, 5 A)- 0*25 
Total for I hour of operation = 0.90 Ah 

Thus, if you divide 0,9 Ah required for 1 
hour of operation into the total of 4.0 Ah 
available from the battery, the battery life 
should be 4,4 hours per charge. However, 
most (alas not all) amateurs listen much 
more than the arbitrary 80/10/10 fonhula 
would suggest. So far, an average of 6 hours 
operation per charge has been obtained. 

Summary 

This battery pack can be constructed by 
the average amateur in several evenings. It 
will operate the average FM rig for more 
than 4 hours in the field or during emer- 
gency power outages. The construction tech- 
niques are straightforward and may be modi- 
fied to suit other solid state equipment. 

, • .. K4 1 KB 



90 



73 MAGAZINE 



Inking M, Gottlieb W6HDM 

931 Olive St. 

Menlo Park CA 94025 



An Ohmmeter that deielops only 
250 mV accross its terminals will 
take tlie headaches oat of check- 
ing circuitry that fools the aver- 
age VOM. 



AN OHMMETER FOR 
SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 



It might appear neither relevant nor 
timely to state that an instrument for 
making quick resistance-measurements is in- 
dispenable in servicing and development 
work. It certainly is true that the VOM and 
the electronic meter have been with us for 
many a moon. And look at the recent 
sophistications and improvements — taut- 
band meters, VOM*s with 20,0000 per volt 
and even greater sensitivities, FET "front 
ends/' digital VOM's, etc. Quick resistance- 
measure me nts, indeed! Where is the prob- 
lem ■' 

Have you ever tried to trouble-shoot a PC 
board loaded with semiconductor devices as 
well as resistors, capacitors, and maybe 
inductors, transformers, and you-name-it? 
Chances are it proved deceptively difficult 
because the IViV developed between the test 
prods of the ohmmeter forward^biased 
various PN junctions^ thereby making resis- 
tance measurements questionable, indetermi- 
nate, and downright bewildering. Oh sure, 
reversing the polarity of the prods can pay 
dividends, but in a complex circuit it is often 
only possible to make limited progress in 
this way. Besides, it is a pain in the neck 
because one has to constantly analyze and 
practically redesign the circuit in order to 
ascertain which way the prods should be 
applied. 

How much nicer it would be to be able to 



move nimbly from point to point, or compo- 
nent to component, and not have to worry 
about the shunting action of PN junctions. 
For example, consider the typical audio 
amplifier. Suppose the circuit is inoperative 
and it is desired to check aU components 
with the ohmmeter. We could remove all of 
the semiconductor devices and then apply 
the ohmmeter test prods to the remaining 
components. In this way a bad or wrong- 
valued resistor could be readily found, as 
could a leaky or otherwise defective capaci- 
tor. If none of the remaining board- 
components are faulty, we could then con- 
centra te on the semiconductors (or for that 
matter, the semiconductors could be 
checked first). 

The only trouble with the above proce- 
dure is that the semiconductors are often 
soldered in place. Removing them m very 
time-consuming and more likely than not, 
thermal damage will be inflicted as one*s 
patience depletes during extrication of a 
stubborn element. There just has to be a 
better way! One can purchase a VQM or 
electronic meter with much less than six- 
hundred millivolts developed between the 
test prods. Such an instrument will ignore 
healthy solid-state elements, greatly facili- 
tating test procedure, 

Another way to fly is to rapidly and 
inexpensively construct a special ohmmeter 



JUNE 1973 



91 



■■aa 



RANGE 
SELECnON 



mxm, 



OfrK)FF\ SWI 




OHWS 



01 
2f4404A 




Fig, 1. Schematic circuit of the ohmmeter for 
solid-state circuits. Transistor Ql need not be a 
2N404A. Any small signal PNP germaniam type 
will work, 

for testing solid-state circuits, I have de- 
veloped a simple but effective ohmmeter 
which I will now describe, 

Figure 1 shows the circuit of the low- 
voltage ohmmeter. Only about 250 mV are 
developed across the test prods, far below 
the value capable of forward-biasing silicon 
junctions in solid-state devices. But what 
have we here? A dc current meter is in the 
collector-base circuit of a transistor connec- 
ted in the common-base configuration. 
Emitter-base bias is provided by Bl, but 
look as one may, there is no obvious source 
of collector bias. Nor is there any subtle or 
tricky current path for polarizing the collec- 
tor. How then can the transistor deliver 
current to the meter? Actually, this is a valid 
way of utilizing the characteristics of a 
transistor. Although infrequently encounter- 
ed, a transistor so employed is capable of 
providing collector current with zero-applied 
collector voltage! In so doing, the transistor 
develops about 250 mV between collector 
and base (this is the maximum voltage 
available at the test prods). Although this 
mode of transistor operation is not generally 
useful, it is just what the doctor ordered for 
our purpose. It should, however, be realized 
that a germanium transistor such as the 
2N404A must be used. 

Other than the unique current-source for 
the microammeter, this ohmmeter operates 
in the same manner as conventional instru- 
ments. Note the range switch, SW2, enables 
the meter to be used as a shunt-type 



ohmmeter for the low range, or as a series- 
type ohmmeter for the high range. 

Popular 20,000n per volt VOM's employ 
50 fJtA meter movements which have an 
internal resistance in the vicinity of 500012. 
On many of these instruments, a 50 ^A 
current-measuring function is provided. 
However, rather than clutter up the already 
congested scales of such meters with addi- 
tional markings, it would appear desirable to 
make a conversion table relating micro- 
amperes to ohms. Inasmuch as this intro- 
duces an inconvenience during test proce- 
dures, the best bet is probably to obtain a 50 
jUcA dc current meter. Then one is free to 
inscribe high and low ohms calibrations as 
shown in Fig. 2* This drawing is intended as 
a general guide and is very approximate- 
So-called 5000O meters will vary consider- 
ably in actual resistance and it would not be 
practical to provide a universal template for 
transferring scale markings to meters- Meters 
also vary in linearity and accuracy. It is 
much better to calibrate the individual meter 
even though accuracy may not be the 
primary goal in a meter for genera Uzed 
trouble-shooting* 

With regard to scale calibration of the 
meter face, the ensuing procedure is a 
straightforward way to get a reasonable 
start. Acquire pairs of the following 5%, VaW, 
composition resistors: 10, 100, 1000, lOK 
and lOOKfi. According to the way each pair 
is used (parallel, singly or series) we then 
have at least the following calibration values: 



I5K 

aoK 



lOOK 
I50K 




Fig. 2. Approximate appearance of high and low 
range ohms scales. To be used only as a guide, 
ActuaJ cdiibratjon is made with the use of known 

resistances. 



92 



73 MAGAZINE 



5, 10, 20, 50, ]00, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 
5K, lOK, 20K, 50K, lOOK, 200K. By 

appropriate combinations of different 
values, one readily comes up with such 
values at 70, 700, 70000, etc., or approxi- 
mately 14, 140, 1400, etc. Additional resis- 
tors can be obtained for more extensive 
calibration. Decade values are the most 
useful. Caution should be exercised in any 
attempt to interpolate calibration mark- 
ings — this just is not easy to do on a scale as 
nonlinear as that of an ohmmeten Two 
scales are caUbrated on the meter face, one 
for the high ohms -range, and the other for 
the low-ohms range. The extremes of the 

high range are lOOO and 150K. The 150K 
marking is close to the zero of the 50 fjiA 
scale. The extremes of the low range are 
lOO and 3K, The 3K marking is close to the 
'*50'* of the 50 ^A scale- When calibrating, 
frequently check the zeroing of the meter. 
This is accomplished by means of RL On 
the high range, an exact fuU-scale meter- 
deflection must exist with the test prods 
shorted. On the low range, an exact-full-scale 
meter-deflection must exist with the test 
prods apart. 

The total measurement range of this 
ohmmeter is ten to one-hundred thousand 
ohms with useful estimates possible some- 
what beyond this range. It happens that such 
a range is adequate for the majority of tests 
in solid-state circuits. Although megohm 
resistance values are occasionally encoun- 
tered, the pronounced tendency is for the 
resistances to range from several tens of 
ohms to several tens of kilo-ohms. 

To use the ohmmeter simply place switch 
SWl in its ON position and zero the meter 
(full-scale deflection, or 50 /lA on the 
current scale) by means of RL If range 
switch SWl is on ''high-ohms," zeroing is 
accomplished with the test prods shorted. If 
SW2 is on -*low-ohms," zeroing is accom- 
phshed with the test prods apart. As with a 
conventional ohmmeter, ascertain that no 
voltage sources are active in the circuitry to 
be tested. In using this ohmmeter, the circuit 
can be investigated without regard to the 
polarity of the test prods. This appUes to 
electrolytic capacitors and to all semicon- 
ductor devices, except tunnel diodes. In the 
vast majority of test procedures using this 



ohmmeter, it will be unnecessary to remove 
solid-state devices in order to make meaning- 
ful resistance tests of the associated passive- 
circuitry. Possible exceptions can occur with 
germanium devices. In the case of ger- 
manium transistors, one can revert to the 
technique of reversing the polarity of the 
test prods. Germanium tunnel-diodes, how- 
ever, should have one lead disconnected in 
order to free circuit tests from the effect of 
their conductivity. Most modem circuit- 
boards tend to have silicon devices. In 
addition to ignoring the junctions of bipolar 
transistors, this ohmmeter will ignore the 
junctions of common signal-diodes, rectifier 
diodes, zeners and varactors, A similar state- 
ment appUes to the gates of FET's, the 

emitters of UJT's, and the entire family of 
SCR devices, including TRIACS, Insofar as 1 
have been able to determine, one should 
likewise be able to ignore the presence of 
most IC modules. Because of the great 
variety and the rapid evolution of IC*s, some 
reservation is purposely held here. 

A minor J but important, detail to remem- 
ber when using this ohmmeter: do not forget 
to turn off SWl when the instrument is not 
being used. Whether used alone, or in con- 
junction with conventional ohm meters, this 
low-voltage ohmmeter can add a new dimen- 
sion of ease in working with solid-state 
circuitry. Although one need not go over- 
board in attaining calibration-accuracy, an 
interesting characteristic should be men- 
tioned for the benefit of those who would 
like to exert some effort to achieve high 
accuracy. Unlike the ohmmeter in conven- 
tional VOM's, the precision of this ohm- 
meter will not be adversely affected by the 
aging of the cell, BL An increase in the 
internal resistance of Bl, or reduction of its 
terminal voltage or current capacity will 
only manifest itself as a nuisance in requiring 
more frequent zero -adjustments. But any 
time the meter remains zeroed over a 
measurement interval, precision will be 
maintained regardless of the position of the 
zero-adjust control, Rl. If one starts out 
with a fresh cell, many months of stable 
operation should be had, providing the 
admonition to turn off SWl is heeded when 
the ohmmeter is idle* 

. . ;W6HDM 



93 




Check these bargains and compare our deal with others... 

DRESS UP YOUR RIG and keep the XYL happy with these modern 
control heads. These are made by RCA but will work with any rig if you 
do a little soldering. 

Contains a DPST switch, and two 20K pots for volume and squelch, all on 
concentric shafts, and an Amphenol mike connector. 
The multiple frequency version contains the above plus a four position, 
two pole rotary switch, and lots of room left inside for extra boards for 
scanners and toneburst generators. 



Single frequency control head only $4.00 postpaid 





Multiple frequency control head only $5.50 postpaid 



ADD MORE TALK POWER with these like new handsets and mikes. Both 
have a transistor preamp built in and come with coil cord and Amphenol 
connector. 





Handsets only ...$6.00 postpaid 

Handset hangers with built-in multipte pole switch, only $1 .50 postpaid 

TERMS: All items sold as is* Illinois residents add 5% sales tax, 

Sendyour check or money order today to DuPage FM Inc. 

P.O. Box 1 
Lombard, 111,60148 

If you have any questions or are looking for something special give us a calL Just ask 
for Bill Lester, Our easy to remember (for us) Telephone is 312*627-3540, 

SPECIAL NOTE TO CATALOG HUNTERS and those who like having price data 
handy for future needs: Despite our loud and bitter protests to the managing editor of 
73, coupled with some awesome threats the production department of 73 insists on 
putting an asterisk next to our name in the advertiser's index and reader service card. 
Check recent issues for examples of what we are talking about. PAY NO 
ATTENTION- CHECK THE NAME OF *DUPAGE FM and we will send you a catalog. 
It will help keep Keith and his boys on the bait if you will send him a note protesting 
the existence of "gremlins" in the production department. 



cc 






PART 97 I 



Starting this month, 73 will run the complete, most up-to-date text of the 
FCC Rules & Regulations, Part 97, pertaining to the amateur radio service. 
The subparts and sections reprinted each month will be listed at the head of 
eachinstaUment. 



Sec* 
97.3 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 



Subpprf A^Gerteraf 



Basis and purpose. 



Subpart B^^Amat^ur Operator and Station 

Licenses 

Oferatoe L^CE^'SES 

67.5 Clsi?fl€Sf of operator licenses. 

97,7 Pri vile ges of o pt* ra t or li ce u ses, 

&7*9 Eligibility for new operator Ucenge. 

07.11 Application for operator license. 

97*13 ReDewal or modificatloQ of operator lieenBe. 

Ope&atqk License KxAMtNATioifB 

97,19 Wben examinntJon Is required. 

97^1 Examination elements. 

97,23 ExamiDatJon requirements* 

97.25 Examination credit. 

97^ Availability of Conditional Class license ex- 
aminations, 

97*28 Mail examinations for diRabled appUeants for 
Amateur Extra and Advanced ClBfis licences. 



SUBPART A— GENERAL 

§ 97.1 Basis and purpose. 

The rules and regalations in tliia part are designed 
to provide an am a ten x radio service having a fiinda- 
mental purpose as expressed in tbe following prin- 
ciples : 

(a) Recognition and enhancement of the Talne of 
the amateur service to the public as a voluntary non- 
commercial commnnlcatioD. service, particularly with 
fi^pect to providing emergency eommnnications. 

(b) Continuation and extension of the amatenr'a 
proven ability to contribute to the advancement of the 
radio art. 

{c> Enconragement and improvement of the ama- 
teur radio service througb rales "which provide for 
advancing skills in both the communicatioQ and technl- 
eal phases of the art. 

(d) Expansion of the existing reservoir within the 
amatenr radio service of trained operators^ techni- 
cianSi and electronics experts. 



(e> Continuation and extension of the amatenr^s 
unique ability to enhance international good wilL 

gS7.3 DegnJtioni. 

(a) Amateur radio service. A radio conunnnicatioii 
service of self-training, in tereommuui cation, and tech- 
nical investigation carried on by amateur radio op- 
erators, 

(b) Amateur radio communication. Noncommercial 
radio communication by or among amateur radio sta- 
tions solely with a perfsonal aim and without pecuniary 
or business in teres L 

(c) Amateur radio operator. A person interested in 
radio technique solely with a personal aim and without 
pecuniary interest, holding a valid Federal Communi- 
cations Commission license to operate amateur radio 
stations. 

<d) Amateur radio license^ The instrument of au- 
thorization Issued by the Federal Communications 
Commission comprised of a station license, and in the 
case of the primary station, also incorporating an op- 
erator Itcenise. 

Operator UcenBC. The instrument of operator authori- 
zation including the class of operator privileges. 

Station tkenw. The instrument of authorization for 
a radio station in the amateur radio service. 

(e) Amateur radio Biatton^ A station licensed in the 
amateur radio service embracing necessary apparatus 
at a particular location used for amateur radio com- 
munication, 

<f ) Primary station. The principal amateur radio 
station at a specific land location shown on the sta- 
tion licen^^ 

(g) Military recreation station. An amateur radio 
station licensed to the person in charge of a station 
at a land location provided for the recreational use 
of amateur radio operators* under military auspices of 
the Armed B'orces of the United States, 

(h) Club station* A separate amateur radio station 
for use by the members of a bona fide amateur radio 
society and licensed to an amateur radio operator act- 
ing as the Ptatlon trii?5tee for the society. 

(1) Addjflonal itaiion. Any amateur radio station 
licensed to an amateur radio oi^erator normally for a 
si)ecific land location other than the primary station^ 
may be one or more of the following: 



JUNE 1973 



95 



^ 



Secondary/ station. Station ticpnsed Iqt a land loca- 
tion other than the primary station location, i,e*, tor 
use at a fiuliordinate location piieh as an office, vaca- 
tion home, etc* 

Control gtaiion. Station llceiij?ed to eonduct remote 
control of another axnateor radio station. 

Auxiliary Unk station. Station, other than a repeater 
station, at a specffle land lot^ation licensed only for the 
purpose of automatically relay iug radio j?iignals from 
that location to another specific land location. 

Repeater atafion. Station licensed to automatically 
retransmit the radio sisals of other amateur radio sta- 
tions for the purpose of extending their intracommnnlty 
Itidlocommirnlcation range, 

(j) Spate radio atution. An amateur radio Btation 
located on an oliject which ie heyond, is intended to go 
beyond, or has been heyond the major portion ot the 
earth's atmosphere. (Hegnlations governing this type 
of station hare not yet Iteen adopted and all apj)lica' 
tlnna wilt be coti.sk1ered on an JudiYidnal basia) 

(k) TerreBtrial loculion. Any point within the major 
portion of the earth*s atmOBpherej including aeronauti- 
cal, land, and maritime locations, 

(1) Bpace locatioft. [ Referred) 

(m) Amateur radi<i opt rat ion. Amateur radio com- 
municatfon conducted by an amateur radio operator 
from an amateur radio station. May include one or 
more of the following ; 

Fiwed opera f^nn. Raaio communicacioa conducted 
from tlie i*i>ecific geographical land location shown 
on the station license. 

Portable operatimi Badlo cotnmunicatiOQ conducted 
from a sr^^dfic geographical Im-atlon other than that 
yhown on the station licenKe, 

Mobile operation. Radio communication conducted 
while in motion or during halts at unftpecifled locations, 

(n) Remote cfmtroL Control of traa.smlttlng ap- 
paratus of an amateur radio station from a position 
other than one at which the transmitter in located and 
immediately accessible, except that direct mechanical 
control, or direct electrical control by wired connec- 
tions^ of an anuitcur radio tran.^mitter from a point 
located on board any aircraft, vessel, vehicle^ or on the 
same premises on which the traiu?mltter is located^ 
Hhall not he eoni?idered remote control within the mean- 
ing of thin di'Onitlon. 

(o) Control link. Apparatus for effecting remote 
control between a control point and a rt»motely con- 
trolled station, 

(p) Control operator. An amateur radio operator 
designated by the licensee of an amateur radio station 
to mlflo be responsible for the emi^lons from that 
station. 

(q) Control point. The oi>eratiug positton of an 
amateur radio staHM>n where the control operator 
function 18 performed. 

(r) Antenna Mtructures* Antenna structures include 
the radiating system, its supporting structures^ and any 
appurtenancteii mounted thereon. 

t8> Antenna her f/ht above (tveraffe terruin. The 
height of the center of radiation of an antenna aboFe 
ftu averaged ralue of the elevation above sea level for 
the surrounding terrain. 

( t ) Tra n »m itter. Appa ra tus for convert I ng electrical 
energy received from a »f>urce into radlo-freqiiencj 
electromagnetic energy capable of being radiated. 

(u) EffcQtive radiated power. The product of the 
yadlo-frefiiiency power, expressed In watta^ delivered 
to an antenua, and the relative gain of the antenna over 
that of a half -wave dlpole antenna^ 

(t) S^$tem network dlagnsm. A diagram showing 
each station and its relationship to the other stations 



in a networjc of stations, and to the control point (a K 
(w) Third-party traffic. Amateur radio communi- 
cation hy or mult^r the super vli^l on of the control opera- 
tor at an amateur radio stdtlon to another amateur 
radio station on behalf of anyone other than the con- 
trol operator. 

(i) Emeracncu commttnication. Any amateur radio 
communication directly relating to the immediate 
safety of life of individuals or the immediate protec- 
tion of pror^erty, 

[f S7J revi&ed r#, 10-17-72^ md (w) d (ff) added eff. 

SUBPART B— AMATEUR OPERATOR AND 

STATION LICENSES 

OpeBJLTOB LiCEIfSES 

§97^ Classes of operator licenses. 

Amateur extra class. 

Advanced class (previously class A). 

General class (previously class B)« 

Conditional class (previously class 0)» 

Technician class* 

Novice class, 

§ 97p7 Privilegea of operator licenses. 

(a) Amatfvr Extra Class and Advnnced Class, All 
authorized amateur privileges Including exclusive fre- 
quency operating authority in accordance with the fol- 
lowing table: 



Frrnqmrndt* 

3500-^25 kHz 

3775-3800 kHz 

7000^7025 kHz, _„ 

14,000-14,025 kHz 

21,000-21.025 kHz- 

21,260-21,270 kHz 

I 

3S00-3S90 KBz. 

7150-7225 kHz ^« 

14,200-14,275 kHz 

2t270^21,350 kHz .»«.— 

50-^.1 MHz_«,„ _^ .. 



0l<i«« of ticensc 
muihifri3€fl 



Amateur Extra Only. 



Ajnateur Extra and Ad' 
vanced. 



(b) General Class and Conditional Class. All author- 
ized amateur privileges except tho9e exclusive fre- 
quency operating privileges which are reserved to thu 
Advanced ClaE^a and/or the Amateur Extra Glasa. 

(c) Teehnician claita. All authorized amateur privi- 
leges on the frequencies 50*1-54.0 MHz and 145-148 

HHz and in the amateur frequency bands ahofe 22(> 
MHz, 

(d> J^otlee class. Tho^ amateur pHvUegea degig* 
Dated and limited as follows : 

(1) Tbe power input to the transmitter final ampll- 
^ing stage supplying radio frequency energy to the 
antenna shall not exceed 75 watts, exclusive of power 
lor heating the cathode of a vacuum tube(s)< 

(2) Radio telegraphy is authorized in the frequency 
hands 3700^750 kHz, 7100-7150 kHz (7050-7075 kHa 
when the terrestrial location of the station is not with- 
in Region 2), 21400-21.200 kHz, and 28;l 00-28,200 kHz, 
using only Type A-1 emission, 

O $t.lie) amended and Note deleted eg. 10-17^72; and 
(«} d (rf) amended eff. ll-2i^2; FJ(7«)-il 

g 97.9 Eligibility for new operator license, 

Fereona are eligible to apply for the variona classea 

of amateur operator licenses as foUowa : 

(a) Amateur extra dass. Any citizen or national of 
the United States who either (1) any time prior to 
receipt of his application by the Commission haa held 



96 



73 MAGAZINE 



for at least 1 jear an amateur operator license of 
otiier than the novice or teotinleiaii claBs^ issued bj any 
egency of tbe U.S, Government, or submits proof that 
he held for a period of 1 year an amateur operator 
license at least equlvaleDt to a general cla.S3 lice n Re 
iBJ^ued bj a foreign government, or (2) aubmlts evi- 
dence of having hf^ld a valid amateur radio station or 
operator license issued by any agency of the U,S, Gov- 
«rmnent during or prior to April 1917. 

(b) Advances Clu*it. Any citizen or natloiial of the 
United States. 

(c) General cla^M. Any citizen or national of tbe 
United States. 

<d) Conditional class* Any citizen or national of 
the United Statcii: 

(1) Whose actual reslde&ee and amateur station 
location are more tlian 175 miles airUne distance from 
the nearest location at which examinations are held 
it intervals of not more than 6 months for General 
Glass amateur operator llcen^s. 

(2) Who is fihown by physician's cerUOcate to be 
unable to appear for examination because of protracted 
disability. 

(8> Who la shown by certificate of the commanding 
officer to b€ In the armed forces of the United States afi 
any Army, Navy, Air Force, or Coast Guard station 
and, for that reason, to be unable to appear for ejt- 
amination at the time and place designated by the 
CommiHslon, 

(4) Who furnishes sufficient evidence, at the time of 
filing, of temporary residence for a contifiuous period 
of at least 12 monthf^ outside the continental limita of 
the United States, its territorieB or possessions, irre- 
spective of other provisions of tb^« paragraph, 

< e ) Tec h n Ic iu n c ta ##. An y ci ti^en o r na 1 1 o n al of the 
United States. 

(f) Novice €t^s». Any cStixen or national of the 
United States, except a person who holds, or who baa 
held within the 12-niontb period prior to the date 
0f receipt of his application* a Co m in issi on-Issued 
amateur radio license. The Novice Class license may not 
be concurrently held witb any other class of amateur 
radio license. 

[I 97.9 (a) amended rff, U-Zl-li; F/(7«J-il 

§97.11 Application for operator license. 

(a) An application^ (FCC Form 610) for a new 
operator license, including an application for change 
in operating privileges, which will require an examina- 
tion sui>ervis€d by Commission personnel at a regular 
Commission examining oflSce shall be submitted to such 
office in advance of or at the time of the examination, 
except that, whenever an examination is to be taken at 
a designated examination point away from s Commis- 
sion office, the application, together with the necessary 
filing fee should b« submitted In advance of fhe ex- 
amination date to the office which has jurisdiction over 
the examination point involved, 

(b) An application (FCC Form 610) for a new 
operator license, including an application for change 
in operating privileges, which requests an e:3taminatlon 
supervised by a volunteer examiner under the pro- 
visions of i97^(b), ahall be submitted to the Com* 
tateion's office at Getty sburg, Pennsylvania, 17325, 
The applicatjon shall be accompanied by any necessary 
filing fee and by a request for the written examination 
material (eee | 97.20 (b>). 

(c) An application <FCO Form 610) for renewal 
and/6r modification of license when no change in op- 
erating privileges Is involved shall be submitted, ten 

gether with any necessary filing fee, to the Commla* 
slon'a office at Gettysburg* Pennsylvania^ 173254 



(97.13 Renewal or modificatidu 4»f operator license. 

(a) An amatejr operator license, except the Novice 
Glada, may be renewed upon proper application la 
which it iB Atated that the applicant has lawfully 
accutnuiated, at an amateur station licensed by the 
Commission, a minimum total of either 2 hours operat- 
ing tluie during the last S months or 5 hours operating 
time during the last 12 montha of the license term. 
Such operating time* for the purpose of renewal* ahall 
be counted as the total of all ISbmt time l^etween the 
entries in the station log showing the t>eginniQg and 
end of tranitmlsi^loas aa required In |&7.103Ca), both 
during single transmissions and during a sequence of 
transmissions. The application shall, In addition to 
the foregoing, include a statement that the applicant 
can send by hand key, i,e„ straight key or any oth^r 
type of hand operated key such as a semi-automatic 
or electronic key, and receive by ear, in plain iangoage, 
me^aages In the International Morse Ck»de at a speed 
of not less than that which is required in qualifying 
for an origtnal license of the class being renewed. 

NoTir ^ Until further order of the Commtislon* the thowlag 
tliat tbe applicant actually operated aii amateur radio itation 
or itatloQB for the periods of time BpeclAed In f 97.13 will 
Dot h^. required in caaeB where It la obown that the appUcant 
was uoabte to conduct iucb opera tion because he was on 
acttTe duty ov*r«eii» In tbe arcowi forces of the United Statei* 
or waa dnlj enrolled aj an employee of an agency of the 
Federal Goirerament ajid In the cM)urs« of luch emplojmeat 
wa^ on Autf In a forelg^a country, contlnaonaiy dnrlog the 
Ltit jrear of the Ucenae term : Frnvidtd^, Tbat any such em* 
plojree of the Federal Oorerttment Bbatl eubmit with bta ap* 
plication for renewal of tlcenae a gtatement signed br bli 
agency head, or tbe chief of tbe Bureau or Dlrlslon In which 
be Is employed attestliig to aueh employment. 

(b) Tbe NoTice Clas^ license will not be renewed* 

(c) Tbe applicant sball qualify for a new license bj 
examination If tbe requirements of tbU section are not 
fumiled. 

(d> Application for renewed and/or modification of 
an amateur operator license «ball be submitted on FGC 
Form 610 and aball be accompanied bj tlie applicant's 
license* Application for renewal of unexpired licenFtea 
moat be made during the lieease term and should 
be Qied within 00 daya but not later than 30 daye 
prior to tbe end of tbe llceuBe teniL En any cajia 
In which the liceo^iee baa, la aecordnnce with the pro- 
TisloQ9 of thli chapter, made timelj and eufficieut 
appHcatlon for renewal of an unexpired Ucenae, eo 
license with reference to any actirity of a continuiug 
nature shall expire until ouch application shall have 
b?en finally determined. 

(e> If a license la allowed to expire, application for 
renewal may be made duHngr a period of grace of one 
year after the expiration date. During this one year 
period of grace, an expired license la not Talid. A 
license renewed during the grai^e period will be dated 
currently and will not be backdated to the date of its 
eipiratiou, Applteation for renewal shall be submitted 
on FCC Farm 610 and shall be accompanied by the 
applicant's expired license. 

(f) When the name of a licensee la changed ar 
when the mailing addref^s is changed a formal appli* 
cation for modification of license is not required. 
However, the licensee ahali notify the Commission 
proEuptly of these changes* The notice, which may be 
fu letter form, shall contain the name and address of 
the licensee as they appear In the Commission's recorda 
the new name and/or address, as the case may be, tbe 
radio station call sign and class of operator license. 
Tbe notice shall be sent to Federal Com mun teat lona 
Commis.?ion, Gettysburg, ^tt.. 17325. and a copy ahall 
be kept by the licensee until a new Ueense ia iaaiied. 



JUNE 1973 



97 



OPERJLTOE LlCiSNSE EXAMINATIOITB 

197.19 Wlien examinati^jfi in requirtiL 

EsamitLatton is reqaired for the issuance of a aew 
amateur operator liceoge, and for a cbaoge in cla^ of 
operating priTileges* Credit may be given, lioweyer, 
for certain elecaeats of eitiiminatiaa as prorlded la 
1 9T,25. 

§97^1 ExaBtinatioEi elementB. 

EicaminatiOQa for amateur operator priTilegee win 
compriae one or more of the fotlowiug examination 
elementfl : 

(a) Element 1(A.^ : Beginner's code test at Atb (5) 
word^ per minute; 

(b) Element 1(B) : General code te«t at thirteen 
<13) words per mlnutii; 

(c) Element 1(C) : Expert's code teat at twenty (20) 
words per minute ; 

(d> Element 2: Basic law compriatng rules and reg- 
ulations essential to beginners' operation, laclndlng suf- 
flcleot elementary radio theory for the uudersfanditig 
of those rules ; 

(e) Element 3: General amateur practice and reg- 
Dlationa involving radio operation aud apparatus and 
provisions of treaties, statutes, and rules affecting 
amateur stations and operators ; 

(t) Element 4(A) : Intermediate amateur practice 
involving intermediate level radio theory and operation 
as applicable to modem amateur techniques, including, 
but not limited to, radiotelephony and radlotelegraphy ; 

(g) Element 4(B) : Adranc^ed amateur practice in- 
volving advanced radio theory and operation as appli- 
cable to modem amateur techniques. Including, hut not 
limited to, radiotelephony, radiotelegraphyt and tran^ 
mlBSiona of energy for measurements and observations 
applied to propagation J for the radio control of remote 
objects and for similar experimental purposes* 

§97<2S Examination requirements. 

Applicants for original licenses will be required to 
pass the following examination elements : 

(a) Amateur Extra Class: Elements 1(C), 8, 4(A), 
aBd4(B> ; 

(b) Advanced Class: Elements 1(B), 3i and 4(A) ; 

(c) General Class and Conditional Class: Elementfl 
1(B) andS; 

(d) Technician Class: Elements 1(A) and 3^ 

(e) Novice Class: Elements 1(A) and 2. 

697«25 Examination credit. 

(a) An applicant for a higher class of amateui* oper* 
ator license who holds a valid amateur operator license 
Issued upon the basis of an examination by the Com- 
mission will be required to pass only those elements 
of the higher class examination that were not included 
In the examination for the amateur license held when 
such application was filed. However, credit wUl not 
be allowed for licenses Issued on the basis of an ex- 
amination given under the provisions of §9T.29(b). 

(b) An applicant for an amateur operator license 
will be given credit for either telegraph code element 
1(A) or 1{B) if within 5 years prior to the receipt of 
Ida application by the Commission he held a commer- 
cial radiotelegraph operator license or permit issued 
by the Federal Communications Commission. An appli- 
cant for an amateur extra class license will he given 
credit for the telegraph code element 1(C) if he holds 
a valid first class commercial radiotdegraph operator 

license or permit issued by the Federal Commuuica* 
tions Commission or holds 'any commercial radiotele- 
graph operator license or permit issued by the Federal 



Communications Commission containing an aircraft 
radiotelegraph endorsement. 

(c) An applicant for the Amateur Extra Class op- 
erator Ucense will be given credit for examination ele- 
ments l(C)t 4(A), and 4(B)t If he so requests and 
submits evidence of having held a valid amateur radio 
station or operator license issued by any agency of the 
tJ.S« Government during or prior to April 1917, and 
«lQalifies for or currently holds a valid amateor operator 
Ucense of the General or Advanced Class. 

(d) An applicant for the amateur extra class opera- 
tor licence will be given credit for examination ele- 
ment 1(C) if he BO requests and submits evidence of 
having held the amateur extra first class license, huT- 
ing continuously held its successor license. An appli- 
cant should present his proof in advance of the desired 
examination time to the Chief, Amateur and Citizens 
Division, Washington, D.C. 20554 and receive a letter 
of certification for presentation to the field office where 
the examination will be taken. No code credit will be 
given without the tetter of certification. 

(e) No examination credit, except as herein pro- 
vided^ shall he allowed on the basis of holding or hav^ 
ing held any amateur or commercial operator Hcenae. 

[| 1^7.25 (ft) amended, (d) redet. as (e} and new (d) 
added eff. 10-27-7B; F/(T£)*/3 

§97^7 Availability of Conditional Class license 
examinations* 
The examinations for Conditional Class will be avai^ 
able only under one or more of the following 
conditions : 

(a) If the applicant's actual residence and proposed 
amateur station location are more than 175 miles air- 
line distance from the nearest location at which exam- 
inations are conducted by an authorized Commission 
employee or representative at intervals of not more 
than 6 months for amateur operator license. 

(b) If the applicant Is shown by physician's certifi- 
cate to be unable to appear for examination because 
of protracted disability. 

(c) If the applicant Is shown by certificate of the 
commanding officer to be In the armed forces of the 
United States at an Army, Navy, Air Force, or Coa?t 
Guard station and, for that reason, to he unable to 
appear for examfuatlon at the time and place desig- 
nated i>y the Commission, 

(d> If the applicant demonstrates by sufficient evi- 
dence that his temporary residence !s for a continuous 
I>eriod of at least 12 months outside the continental 
limits of the United Srates, its territories or posses- 
sions, IrreBpeetive of other provisions of this section. 

|97<2§ Mail examinations for disabled applicants for 
Amateur Extra and Advanced Class licenses, 

(a) The Commmion may permit the examination 
for an Amateur Extra or Advanced Class license to ba 
admitastered by a volunteer examiner selected hy the 
applicant when it is shown by a phy*«ician*a certificate 
that the applicant is unable to appear for a Com- 
mission supervised examination because of p rot meted 
diftabllity. 

(b) The volunteer examiner for an Amateur Bxtra 
or Advanced Clan^ license exatiiiuation shnll be at least 
21 years of age and shall he the holder of a class of 
amnteur operzitor license equal to or higher than the 
clasw of UeeaHe for which the appUcftut is being exam- 
ined. The written portion of the exuuilnation shall be 
obtained, superviii^, aud submitted in acconlance with 
the iirocedure^* set forth in J 9T.29(b). 

(To be continued next month) 



98 



73 MAGAZINE 



♦:♦♦:♦♦:♦♦♦:♦:♦:♦:#:♦ 



Caveat Enptor? 



♦:♦♦:♦♦:♦♦:♦:♦:♦♦:♦:♦ 



Pfkse — S2 per 25 ijvofrfs tor noncommercial 
ads: S1 p«f 25 ivords for business ve-ntures Mo 
displ^ ids. OT agency dcicouni- fnclude your 
check Mith order. 

DmadUne tar ads is th« 1st of the monih tvw} 
ni'OnTh& prior to publication, for example: 
ianjary lit is the deadline for the March issue 
which will 'b« mattad on the 10th of Febmary. 

Type copy. Phrase ^d punctuate exact iy a^ 
you wtsh It to appeair, No all -capital ads.. 

We wili km ihe judige of furiabihty ol adf. Our 
re^ponsibrlilv for errort extends only to print- 
ing a correct ad m a lat«r is$ue. 

For $1 extra m» can ma in vain a reply box for 
you. 

We cannot check into nach advertiser, $o Caveat 
Emptor , . . 



HEIP WANTED - Assistant Circufa- 
tfon Manager for 73 Magazrne, male or 
female. Must be fluent in English^ 
have proficrency in readfng/writing 
Spanish, and have tvP'ng ability. Pre- 
fer hann or previous ham, domestic or 
foreign. Send resume c/o Circulation 
Manager^ 73 Magazine, Peterborough 
NH 03458. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILUNOIS Are^ 
Hamfest, July 8, Morgan County Fair^ 
grounds, rain or shine. Tickets S1.50 
or 4 for $5.00. WB9CEB, Box 571, 
Jacksonville^ Illinois 62650. 

WANTED; OLD RADIO TRANS- 
CRIPTION DISCS. Any size or speed. 
Send list and details to Larry Kiner 
W7F(Z, 7554 132nd Ave. N.E., Kirk- 
land, Wash. 98033. 

SSTV ROBOT CAMERA OWNERS 

— NOW available a vidicon carriage 
kit for micro photography to take 
pictures as small as a postage stamp. 
INSTALL IT YOURSELF, $12.00 
prepaid anywhere in U.S.A. Write to 
K8NTE, BOB PINDER, 1277Crickle- 
wood S.W., Wyoming, Michigan 
49509. 

WILL PAY $4.00 each for magnetic 
tapes for IBM MT/ST Selectric Com- 
poser. Must be in top condition. Box 

UN11M, 73 Magazine, Peterborough 
NH 03458. 



GLOBAL RESEARCH & Supplies, 
Amateur Equipment & Service. Dy- 
comm. Galaxy, Tempo, Kenwood, 
Inoue, B&W, SBE, Hy Gain, Gush- 
Craft, Larsen. 312/2794658. P.O. Box 
271, Lombard, III., 60148. 

VACUUM MOLDING BUSINESS for 

sale, complete with orders. Ideal for 
Magnetic Plastic Signs, etc. 24" x 30" 
Machine & associated Equipment. 
$5000.00. P.O. Box HT, 73 Magazine, 
Peterborough NH 03438. 



E0LnniENTFROM73 
The following list of gear, unless 

otherwise noted, consists of brand 

new equipment purchased for testing 

purposes only. Some have been tested, 

some remain unopened in original 

cartons. We are offering this gear at a 

considerable discount on a first-come- 

first-served basis. 

Hallicrafters FPM 300 

SSB xcvr S480 

Heath 18 101 and 

Vanguard Scaler $250 

Miida Dtgipet 60 counter with 

Digipet 160 converter $400 

Tempo CL 220 220 xcvr $265 

HR2MS 8 ch scanning 2m xcvr 

15W $255 

TME-H-LMU 16 ch scanning 

rcvr 6/2/%m 

Digital Logiclocks S80 

Midland 13509 220 Xcvr S200 

Midland 1S20 Hand-held 2 meter $190 



it^ 



DON AND BOB" guaranteed buys. 
Triex W^51 386.00; MW50 250.75; 
MW65 331.50; Ham-M 99.00; TR44 
59.95; AR22R 31.95; Beiden 8214 
RG8 foam coax 17«i/ft; 8448 rotor 
cable lOrf/ft; HyGain TH6DXX 
139.00; 204BA 129,00; TH3MK3 
114.00; 400 rotor 179.95; Mosley 
CL36 149.00; CL33 124.00; TA33 
114,00; MCQ3B 91.00; S402 143.00; 
3/16" cable clamp IBd: Mallory 2.5A 
/1000PIV epoxy diode 29rf; Polygon 
fiberglas spreader 7.50; KY65code ID 
5.95; write quote Midland, Regency; 
Clegg FM27B; Hallicrafters FPM300A; 
Drake, SBE, Standard, Eimac, Collins, 
CDE replacement parts. Shipping 
charges collect; warranty guaranteed. 
Mastercharge, BAG. Madison Elec- 
tronics, 1508 McKinney, Houston, 
Texas 77002 (713)224 2668. 

2 MTR. 8 CH. SCANNER $70; Heath 
Two'er S20; AX 190 80-10 Mtr. xstr. 
rcvr. SI 85; T-60 8a6M. AM/CW 
xmtr. $15; H. Ober, 20005 Roscoe 
BL, Canoga Park CA 91306. 

LAMPKIN MODEL III PPM Meter, 
mint condition, also RCA WG297 
H.V. probe, first $50.00 M.O. takes 
both. J. Kaufman, 125 River, Alpena, 
Mich. 49707- 

FOR SALE: COLLINS GEAR TO 
THE HIGHEST BIDDER, 32S3, 
75S3, KWM-2A, 2-312B4,30Ll, 2 AC 

power supplies, in excellent condition, 
original owner. WA2KNC— Jack Aviv, 
106 Glenn Avenue. Lakewood, NJ 
0870 L 



DELMARVA HAMFEST August 19, 
1973, Harrington Fairgrounds. Regis- 
tration fee S2 advance, S3 at the gate. 
For information write Delmara Ham- 
fast. Inc., Route 2, Box 90, Laurel, 
Delaware 19956. 



CANADIANS - FREE 120 page Elec- 
tronics Catalog. ETCO-B, 464 McGill, 
Montreal, 



WARREN HAMFEST, Urgest family 
style Hamfest in East. Sunday, August 
19th, @ Famous Yankee Lake Park. 
Giant Fleamarket, Swimming, Picnick- 
ing- All Free. Details QSL W8VTD. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC solid state 
Voice Commanders, 2 each with nicad 
packs. Excellent mechanical shape, 
$60 each, $110, pair; trade for 450 
MHz base, repeater, or HT. John 
Thornton, 12585 Jones Bar Rd,, 
Nevada City CA 95959. 

TECH MANUALS for Govt surplus 
gear only $6.50 each: R-389/URR, 
R-3 90/U R R , R-220/UR R, 
R 274/FRR, TS-382DU/U, TT-63/V/ 
FGC, URM 25D, ALR5, LP-5. 
W3IHD, 7218 Roanne Drive, Washing- 
ton, DC 20021, 

MODERNIZE FOR PEANUTS! 

Frame & display QSL's with 20 pock- 
et plastic holders. Two for $1.00, 
seven for $3.00. Prepaid, guaranteed. 
Universally used and approved. Order 
now. TEPABCO, Box 198S, Gallatin, 
Tennessee 37066. 

6 MTR 250 WATT base station, GE 
Preprog too big to ship, $75.00, 
Foster, Box 198 Star Route, Tijeras, 
NM 87059 (505)281-3975. 

MIX PLEASURE WITH PLEASURE. 
1973 Hamburg International Hamfest 
on Sept. 15 only 45 minutes from 

fabulous Niagara Falls. RV parking for 
weekend only S2.50 with hook-up. 
Details: Valerie Orgera K2KQC, 187 
Main, Hamburg, N.Y, 14075, 



ROSS and WHITE or Kyokuto Denshi 
2 meter FM 10 watt transceiver. In- 
ternal tone bur^t with 4 tones. Crys- 
tals for 52/52, 76/76, 94/94, 04/64, 
16/76, 22/82, 34/94, 37/97. See 73 
Magazine 4/72. S225. 8 hour battery 
and charger $25. Heavy duty leather 
case for radio and battery SI 5. Tiny 
Tone touch tone kit S30. K6ESC, 
20650 Lomita, Saratoga CA 95070 
408-867-3912, 



HO OSIER ELECTRONICS - Your 
ham headquarters in the heart of the 
Midwest where only the finest ama- 
teur equipment is sold. Individual, 
personal service by experienced and 
active hams. Factory -authorized deal- 
ers for Drake, Regency, Standard, 
Clegg, Ten -Tec, Galaxy, Hy-Gain, 
CushCraft, Mosley, Ham-M, Hustler, 
electronic pocket calculators, plus 
many more. Orders for in-stock mer- 
chandise shipped the same day. Write 
or call today for our quote and try 
our personal friendly Hoosier service. 
Hoosier Electronics, R. R. 25, Box 
403, Terre Haute, Indiana 47802. 
(812)894-2397. 



HT-220 two watt two channel with 
^ase - best offer over S75. Box 12, 73 
Magazine, Peterborough NH 03458. 



JUNE 1973 



99 



^ 



RESISTORS: A-B, Stackpole, most 
valuesp .'■^W, 5% 5rf. Signetics N 744 IB 
$1.15* List SASE, Texas residents 5% 
tax. I.C.S. Company, Box 622, 
Bel la ire, Texas 77401 , 

SSTV FOCUS/DEFLECTION COIL 
KIT for K7YZZ VA" Plumbicon type 

camera circuit Ire., 73 Magazine, Sept. 
72) complete with reprint article, 
$19.95 postpaid in U.S. and Canada. 
Also fast scan 1%'' coiJ kits dS well as 
many other SSTV kits, parts and 
plans. See regular ad elsewhere in 
magazine. Write or phone for free 
catalog. ATV RESEARCH, 1301 N. 
Broadway, Dept 730, Dakota City, 
Nebr. 68731. 

COWLETE 36 page QSL catalog, 3rd 

edition. New ''SPARKLING" QSLs, 
Hundreds of cuts, ten report forms, 
thirteen colored stocks, 25d Ten 
sample QSL cards. Cornel Ison's Quali- 
ty QSU, 321 Warren St, IM. Babylon, 
N.Y. 11704, 

WANTED-HF SSB xceiver/ac-dc p.s., 
2m Fm xceiver, Ht-200 orequivalent* 
HAVE mint R'390/A with spares, 
cables, case, tech. man. etc. for trade* 
Make offer. T.L. Fleming {WB5DRR) 
Apt. "C" 5919 W. 19th St, Little 
Rock, Arkansas 72204. 

MUST SELL for college expenses. 
DAVCO DR 30 high performance 
solid state receiver. Cost $400, asking 
$200, OMEGA DA full feature IC 
keyer with built-in double paddle. 
Cost S85, asking S40. Both are in very 
good condition. Andrew Beary, 
WA3DQS, Box 526, 5115 Margaret 
Morrison Street, Pittsburgh, PA 
15213. 

GIANT N.E, CONVENTION spon- 
sored by FEMARA Sept 29 & 30 at 
Dunfey's Hyannts Resort on Cape 
Cod. Huge flea market, seminars, FM, 
SSTV, MEDXCC, AMSAT, YL trips, 2 
pools, golf, beaches, sailing. Early bird 
registration still only S3 from 
W1ZQQ, 17 Barnes Avenue, E. 
Boston, Mass. 02128. Special early 
bird hotel discount available. 

WANTED: Motorola HT*220. 
WA2FAS, 24 Gardenia Drive, Maple 
Shade, New Jersey 08052, 

SELL: E.E, and other technical 
books. SASE for list Roger A. Bairn 

WB9BDP, 2753 W. Coyle, Chicago, IIL 
60645, 

HP416A RATIOMETER $125. 

Gertsch RT*5R Ratiotransformer like 
new $100, Beckmen 7250 BR counter 
S3 5. 00. Frequency Standard - late 
model NAVY-URQ*9, 5, 1, .001 MHz 
output 110 VAC or 24 VDC emer- 
gency input Similar in specs to a 
Sultzer 5 with SP supply $1000. Will 
consider trade for surplus video equip- 
ment Norman Gitlaspie, Box 2124, 
Monterey CA 93940. 1 ^08-375-7424. 



YOUR CALL LETI^ERS. Two se^, 

for windshield and rear glass. Smart 
white letters with red outline. Easily 
installed pressure sensitive decals. 
$1,00, postage paid, anywhere. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Lake Jordan 
Artists, Slapout AL 36092* 

GLADDING 25 2M-FM transceiver. 
Late model with new audio, micro- 
phone. Includes AC supply. St 80, 
WA7SJN Bill Nelson, 4414A Larch, 
Mountain Home AFB Idaho 83648. 

90-DAY GUARANTEE on all these 
Fully Reconditioned receivers: Drake 
2-C/2-CQS $219, HaHicrafters SX-99 
$79, SX-101 $129, SX-101 Mark-3A 
$139, Hammarlund HQ-100 S99, 
HQ'IOOAC $129, HQ-110C S1 19, 
HQ^IIOAC S139, Hai70AC S189. 
More arriving daily. Write; Burghardt 
Amateur Center, Box 73A, Water- 
town, S.D. 57201. 

TAKE YOUR PICK from this wide 
selection of SSB Transceivers, all fully 
reconditioned with 90'day Guarantee: 
Drake TR-S $369, TR-4, $419, Eico 
753 with both AC/DC $159, Galaxy 
GT-550A/AC-400/SC-550A $499, 
Kenwood TS-51 1S/PS-51 IS $429, 
SBE SB 34 $269, Swan 175 virtth both 
AC/DC $129, 240/n7AC S219, 
350/1 17XC $249, 350C S279, 
S00/117XC S419, WRL Duo Bander 
84 with AC or DC $129. More an^iving 
daily. Write: Burghardt Amateur Cen- 
ter, Box 73 A, Watertown, S.D. 5720 1 

TEKTRONIX 545 'SCOPE, complete 

but not working, $150 or trade. Send 
SASE for details. 6' x 19" equipment 
rack, $25 or trade. Other stuff. Jim 
Einolf, 1222 N. Capitol Ave., Lansing, 
ML 48906. 

WOOD STOCK GRA VITATION AL 
SOCIETY is dedicated to the en- 
couragement of discussion and publi- 
cation of serious scientific proposals 
concerning gravitational and related 
phenomena. For further information 
write: Woodstock Gravitational So- 
ciety, TO Hasbrouck Lane, Box 157, 
Woodstock, New York 12498. 



WANTED: HQ'129, Sky Champion, 
Comet Pro, RME'69, calibrator for 
NC-300 — in good condition, prefer- 
ably in mint condition, by cheapskate 
collector of historical ham gear. Why 
let your widow throw out that old 
30's receiver — sell it to Department 
HQ-12d, 73 Magazine, Petertioroygh 
NH 03458 for bottom dollar. Please 
state absolute minimum you'll take. 

RECORDER, EA- AW, 11SV 60HZ, 
Input 1-MADC, manual and some ac- 
cessories S70.00; Sound powered 
handsets, new $5.00. WIIIB, C. 
Wallace, 8 Elaine St, Hampton, N*H. 
03842. 

NAME YOUR DEAL! Following 

items offered either "Fully recon- 
ditioned with 90-day guarantee" or 
"Working condition — AS- IS (price in 
parenthesis): Viking ll's $35($25), 
Viking II with 122 VFO $79 ($59), 
Valiants $99($8g). Rangers Sa5{$75), 
excellent Ranger If $129($n9). 
Globe LA-1 Linear S55(S45l Johnson 
Courier Linear S85(S75), National 
NC'173 $59(549), Heath TX-1 
$59{$49), Gonset IV $99(SB5), 
Johnson 6-N2 Converter $2 5 ($20), 
Heath SB* 10 $50($40). Write: 
Burghardt Amateur Center, Box 73A, 
Watertown, S.D. 57201, 

SSTV MONITOR TUBES 5 to 12 inch 

P7 P14 also ok, electromagnetic and 
electrostatic FOCUS types. 12.50 to 
28,00. 25i stamps for specs, prices. 
Other surplus. Lotz, 750 Florida 
Blvd., New Orieans, La. 70124. 

AMATElfR EXTRAS only - Wattet 
size miniature of your license. Send 
original (which vwll be returned) + $3. 
Box 60045; Chicago, Illinois 60660. 

H I FI MOTORCYCLE HELMETS 

Concealed speakers, left side mini 
jack. Complete with made up cable 
and plugs that fit TR-22 and most 
tape decks or CB's, fiberglass, most 
colors, gold and green flake $58.00. 
Amateur net $36.00 postpaid in US, 
Saint Communications, RR1, Box 
402, Idaho Springs, Colorado 80452. 



NEW PRODUCTS (cont. from p. 20) 

associated transistor to appear on the 
monitor! The lines were sharp, the 
resistor values were absolutely read- 
able and. Holy Moses, the idea hit us 
what a great way this is to trade 
schematics over the air . . , 

Pictures v^re even better. Since 
enlargements vmre no longer needed 

for a good slow scan image, a gold 
mine of material opens up with every 
batch of snapshots from the brand X 
photo processor in town. 

The micro photography kit is avail- 
able for 812.00 postpaid from Bob 
Pinder K8NTE^ 127? Cricklewood 
SW, Wyoming Mf 49509, 




WAyne demon- 
strates the US& dt 
a 2m fire bat con- 
taining iBC's 
mtaU moduies. Is 
ttmt transmitter 
putting out an 
FM signal or 
Alpha wavinf 




100 



73 MAGAZINE 





Would you believe titat there are some of us who remember when 73 Magazine was only 37rf a 
copy? (How time does fly I) 

At the present time our subscriptions are increasing over 1,000 per month and we're beginning to 
realize that 1 973 is our year (obviously). 

In order to further accelerate this trend, we're rolling back the calendar ,,• yes, back to 
1960 . - , and 37i a copy. We realize that we cannot get rich this way, but who cares when you an 
make so many subscribers happy! 

Now - - . for a limited time only , . . (untif we regain our senses) , , , you can subscribe to 73 for 
only 37rf a copy on a S-year subscription. That's only $13.32 for 3 years. 

Subscribe NOW and have it end in '76, That's the spfrit* 




UNDERCOVER A GENT 00... 




MAKE YOUR QSLs PAY OFF! 

As UndercovBT AgBiit 0073 you can get up to $100 for a $1 mvestment. 

How would you like to make your QSLs start paying you? You can do this by signing up as an 
undercover agent for 73 Magazine — this is the key to being able to make a substantial side income. 
That's right, you can let your hobby help to pay for itself I 

When you send out your QSL cards, all you have to do is include a special 73 subscription 
application with your card for the other operator to send direct to us. Your name as Undercover 
Agent 0073 will be on that card and you will receive one dollar for each one year subscription sent in* 

You can sign up as an Undercover Agent 0073 and get 100 of these subscription applications — for 
only $1 (to cover the cost of handling). 

Most of the operators you contact would enjoy reading 73, if they knew about it. Your QSLs will 
help spread the word — and bring you a commission to boot. 

Bonus $100 

As a further bonus — the first 73 undercover agent who gets $100 in commissions will receive an 
extra $100. 



D New Su hscrip lion 
n Renewal or extension 



a 



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73 Magazine 
Peterborough NH 03458 USA 



JUNE 1973 



3yrs, $13.32 



CH 1 yr, $6 



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JUNE 1973 



101 



urn 




SJow Scan Tttevisiofi 
Handbook, by Don C, 
Miller, W9NTP and 
Ralph Taggart 
WB8DQT. 

This excellent book 
tells all about it, from 
Its history and basics to 
the present state-of- 
the-art techniques. Con- 
tains chapters on ctr- 
cuits, monitors, 
cameras, color SSTV, 
test equipment, and 
much more, 272 pages, 
softbound $5, hard- 
bound $?• 




O €l 



.A 13 Pik 




igital Control of Re- 
peaters, by Tom 
Yocom, WA02HT. 

Here's a book for the 
FM'er who wants to de- 
sign and build a dtgital 
repeater control sys- 
tem. Contains sections 
on repeaters, basic logic 
functions, logic circuit 
design, control systems, 
support circuits, mobile 
i nstallations, touch- 
tone, plus special sec- 
tion on a "mini" re- 
peater control system. 
224 pages, softbound 
$5; hardbound $7, 



:-:-:«-K«? 






DIGITAL 



m 












REPE'rv^^-rtS 





:iy Tom Yocom Sm, 






FM Repeater Circuits 
Ma n ua I , by Ken 
Sessions 

Contains almost 
every conceivable cir- 
cuit that might be ne^- 
ed for U5^ with a re- 
peater. All circuits ex- 
plained rn detail and 
easily understood. All 
aspects covered, from 
the operator to the an- 
tenna. Also contains 
chapters on setting up a 
mobile station and 
many other articles for 
th© use of the VHF and 
UHF enthusiasts. 305 
pages, softbound, $5. 
Hardbound, $7. 

SoJJd State Projects 
Wayne Green, Editor. 
Here are rn ore then 
60 projects of interest 
to anyone in electro- 
nics. The devices ran^ 
from a siitiple transistor 
tester tJ an electronic 
counter — and from a 
capacity meter to a 
ham TV receiver. The 
idea of this collection is 
not only to provide you 
with interesting and 
practical projects to 
build, but also to help 
you become more in- 
timately acqu ain ted 
with such rnodern com- 
ponents as ICs, varac- 
tors and leners. 224 
pages, softbound. $4. 




SOLID-STATE PROJEaS 
for the Experimenter 



8| fttfffs GniP 




RTTY Handbook, 

Wayne Green, Editor. 

A comprehensive 
book covering all areas 
of radro teletype, from 
getting started with the 

basic principles, what 
equipment to procure 
and how to make it 
work. The only up-to- 
date book available on 
the subject. Well writ- 
ten, easy to read and 
understand. 320 pages, 
softbound. $6. 



IC Projects, Wayne 
Green, Editor. 

The transistor re 
placed the tubes in the 
1960's, and sotderihg 
guns replaced the 100 
watt soldering irons — 
but today in the 
19?0's, integrated cir- 
cuits and soldering pen 
cils are replacing tran- 
sistors. This book tells 
how to understand and 
use iCs, ivith numerous 
construction projects. 

For the ultra- 
modern home brewer^ 
139 pages, softbound. 
$4. 




(IIUIIIIIIEIIIIEI 



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- ' Editetl t^ 

WmJP 
llSf no^ 









As you probably know, it is virtually impossible to do well in any contest unless you 
have an Extra Class license. Also vwith the DX stations mostly in the Extra Class bands, 
you don't have much chance of working the hard ones unless you have your 
Extra, 

Before the 73 Extra Class Study Guide this was a problem. There just wasn't any 
book that adequately prepared you for this difficult exam- Since studying the 73 book 
makes passing the technical part a snap, there is absolutely no reason whatsoever for you 
to be a second class citizen on the ham bands- Why not go FIRST CLASS and enjoy all 
the privileges? 

In addition to your regular license and upon application to the FCC (with no charge), 
all Extra Class ops are entitled to a large Extra Class certificate, suitable for framing. Why 
not display one of these in your shack? 

We have sold all our softbound ($5) copies of this excellent book and have a limited 
number of hardbound copies left. The hardbound regularly sells for $7, but for a limited 
time we are reducing this book to $5. Why not order today and start enjoying more of 
amateur radio? 

de W1GR0 




BOOKS ORDER FORM 



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$ 



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103 



W2NSD/1 (continued from p. 4} 

bonanza trial subscription offer. If 
every single member of your dub does 
not immediatefy srgn up to become a 
73 sub^riber the entire editorial staff 
of the magazine will be so surprised 
and shocked that they may discon- 
tinue their fifelong membership in the 
ARRL Now, you wouldn't want any- 
thing drastic like that to happen, 
would you? 

Why take a chance? 

Gall your secretary and get him on 
the stick - accept no excuses. Let's 
get this show on the road. 

UNUSUAL OCCUPATIONS 

While out in California I met an 
amateur who has been working with a 
medical unit experimenting with pres- 
sure chambers and they had discover- 
ed that people put in an oxygen 
atmosphere under pressure would un- 
dergo some interesting changes — like 
getting younger - hair beginning to 
grow back on balding heads -things 
like that. 

Since amateurs are into virtually 
everything that is going on scientifi- 
cally, perhaps through the pages of 73 
we can get some hints on interesting 
developments that are shaping up 
which we might not otherwise hear 
about. Unless the readers of 73 are a 
lot more reactionary than I pve them 
credit for, they share my interest in 
new ideas — and are looking for fasci- 
nating new things to talk about on the 
air. How many times can you tell 
people you are using a dipole antenna, 
anyway? 

Somewhere I read that an ionized 
atmosphere is conducive to better 
work and to better thinking. Some 
experiments had been made with 
having a highly charged metal sheet 
along the ceiling — and people didn't 
get tired nearly as fast. This obviousfy 
could be done with a television high 
voltage supply and some aluminum 
foil — has anyone any data on this? 

What about Kirilian photography? 
Has any reader experimented with this 
as yet? Please fet us know! 

I've talked with quite a few readers 
who have worked with orgone and 
orgone accumulators — so how about 
some data on this for us? Come on, 
let's get some weirdo junk into 73 for 
a change (will that be a 
change?) — and let's try to make it far 
out enough so that W5 down there 
wilt be so dumbfounded he will make 
the first contact of his life without 
telling what rig he is using. 

BIG AND LITTLE HAND UNITS 

There is no question that the 

Motorola HTs are beautfrful gadgets. 
They are small — light — and rugged. 
But they are more geared to the 



commercial market than the hams by 
virtue of their small size. 

The slightly larger hand units such 
as the Standard 146A and the Ken 
KP-202 use small parts, but not ex- 
tremely small parts. The cost differ- 
ence is substantial both for original 
manufacture and for replacement. 
Those micro parts are expensive to 
buy and incredibly difficult to change, 
thus making the larger hand units 
much less expensive to make and to 
service. 

The initial expense of the HTs h^ 
been kept down by Motorola units 
which were rejected from commercial 
applications being made available to 
ham builders for repairs - but this 
doesn't help on later repairs as much. 

OCEAN US 

Ace Goodwin W1GR0, our circula- 
tion manager, keeps his eyes open for 
newideas and it was he who called the 
existence of Ocean us to my attention. 
In an article in Yankee magazine — a 
magazine published in the next town 
to Peterborough — the concept of a 
new country, belonging to aft man- 
kind, and dedicated to the protection 
and development of the oceans of the 
world, was revealed 

The '^territory" of Ocean us consists 
of all of the seas of the world beyond 
the three mile limit from the land 
countries. Thus Oceanus is by far the 
largest country in area in the 
world - many times over. The consti- 
tution of Oceanus is quite parallel to 
that of the United States and the idea 
is that it will be governed by the 
nations of the worid for the benefit of 
all mankind, rather than by a small 
group for their own profit* 

My attention was first attracted by 
the idea of a new country. You know 
what happens to a DXer when you 
wave even the po^ibility of a new 
country at him. And you may have a 
faint idea of what h^PPe^is to a 
DXpeditioner when you even hint at a 
brand new country for him to operate 
from I 

Once my attention had been at- 
tained, I got to thinking about the 
idea of Oceanus. I got to thinking that 
somehow over the centuries the 
governments of the world have looked 
upon the oceans as not being territory 
and thus not being owned by anyone 
or any govern menL There have been 
some problems raised due to fishing 
rights, radio broadcasting, and things 
like that - but the idea of the oceans 
of the worid being territory doesn't 
seem to have evolved, 

Obviously this idea of the oceans as 
non-territory is about to break down. 
More and more use is being made of 
the seas and the land under them. We 
already have offshore oil drilling over 
three miles out. And with the tech- 



niques of undersea exploration ex- 
panding rapidly, the day when we 
have undersea mines, gardens, and 
perhaps fish ranches is within grasp of 
the imagination. 

We can all vwait for the biggest 
nations of the worid to start claiming 
the oceans — five miles — fifty 
miles- 200 mifes-2000 miles. The 
wealth of the oceans is beyond estima- 
tion so there will be quite a fight* It 
would seem obvious that the smaller 
nations of the worid would lose out 
and the bigger nations would become 
bigger — and exploitation would be 
the name of the game. 

Thus the idea of setting up the 

oceans of the world as a new country, 
run by the nations of the world, 
seemed like an idea that had arrived at 
the right time. The initial work to be 
done by the new nation would be to 
start cleaning up pollution and pre- 
venting it in every way possible. 

My first move was to get in touch 
with Admiral Welles, the chief execu- 
tive of Oceanus, at the home base of 
Oceanus in Manset, Maine. We talked 
on the phone a couple of times and 
then got together for a tong tafk and 
brainstorming session. 

The basic problem v^th establishing 
a new country such as this is in getting 
it recognized- Obviously the U.S. is 
going to be extremely reluctant to 
recognize Oceanus since such a recog- 
nition would tend to diminish the 
possible future claims of the country 
for large areas of the oceans. Since the 
smaller countries of the world and, in 
particular, the land-locked countries 
have the most to gain from getting a 
piece of the oceans - or at least in 
making sure that the oceans don't just 
go outright to the big nations - these 
countries will be approached first- 

Another tack which could help to 
establish the validity of the country 
would be via the United Nations. The 
virtual control of the U,N. by a 
handful of targe nations means lhat 
Oceanus wouldn't have a prayer oy a 
frontal approach. But how about 
through the ITU section of the UN? 
Suppose we first set up Oceanus as a 
separate country with a radio prefix 
which is registered with the ITU? The 
ITU naturally will not want to extend 
recognition to a country that is not 
otherwise recognized; yet on the other 
hand they are most anxious to keep 
radio call prefixes under control and 
registered according to their system. 

We shall see* One of the first moves 
1 made was to send a letter to the ITU 
on behalf of Oceanus telling them that 
the government of Oceanus would like 
to issue call letters in the block 01 AA 
to O0ZZ. This series has not yet been 



104 



73 MAGAZINE 



allocated as far as I know. The calls 
would be used only witfiin the limits 
of Oceanus aboard vessels of Oceanus 
registrv^ It was proposed that the ITU 
zone numbers would be added after 
the call letters of the station as an 
indication of the area of Oceanus 
within which the station was being 
operated. 

Oceanus has been set up in such a 
way that the citizens of any country 
of the world may apply for dual 
citizenship. Citizenship in Oceanus 
will in no way affect citizenship in the 
U.S. or any other country. Vessels 
may be registered with Oceanus and 
still keep their registry anywhere else. 

Along the same line ft is proposed 
to issue amateur radio licenses valid 
for operation in Oceanus on Oceanus 
registered vessels to amateurs of any 
country. There will be no licenses 
issued to anyone not holding a valid 
amateur license in another country. 

As far as I know there is no 
precedent of U.S. citizens establishing a 
brand new country, so the govern- 
ment agencies of the U.S. don't know 
just how to deal writh the problem. 
They can't go by tile rule book when 
there are no rules. 

In order to get started on the 
recognition of Oceanus Admiral 
Welles has appointed me as Chancellor 
of Telecommunications. The FCC has 
already warned me that as the repre- 
sentative of a foreign government they 
may have to take away my ham 
ticket -and while I don't want to 
lose that that certainly would be a 
recognition of Oceanus. It's a merry- 
go-round. If they refuse to accept 
Oceanus then they can't harass me — 
if they do get after me then itiey have 
granted official status to Oceanus, 
Perhaps, so to speak. I can pu^ the 
car from the running board to get it 
started and then jump off when it gets 
going. 

Once in motion, Oceanus should 
move along briskly. What with small 
taxes on users of the country such as 
ships and cables - fines for ecological 
despoilers — licenses for developers, it 
could be quite a thing in 20 years. 

« 

COLLINS COMEBACK? 

Collins is again beginning to think 
in terms of a reactivated amateur sales 
effort. An official of Collins recently 
explained that engineers and techni- 
cians had, on several occasions, gotten 
new ham products ready for produc- 
tion, only to have the plans cancelled 
by erstwhile prexy Art Collins. 

The S-line and KWM gear are still 
popular, despite the design being the 
oldest on the market today. The 
reliability buitt into Collins equipment 
cannot be denied - it runs through 



thick and thin — and is ideal for ex- 
peditions where reliability is the key 
factor. 

The recent reports of Collins mak- 
ing deals in Japan for production of 
ham gear in that country have been 
confirmed, though the plans are ap- 
parently to produce it only for sale in 
Japan, and not for expon to the U.S. 

The financial traumas of a couple 
of years have been eased and Collins 
stock has been gradually gaining 
ground. It dropped from about $1 15 a 
share in 1967 to about 10% of that 
figure — and is now back up to around 
S25 a share. There is still a lot of debt, 
but the present management has set a 
good record and the prospects are 
bright, 

ONE MEG 

Some scoundrel has been whisper- 
ing that Wayne Green is trying to 
change repeaters to one meg spacing. 
Utter rot and baloney. Wayne Green 
honestly doesn't give a damn whether 
repeaters are 600, 601, 990, 1 meg or 
1200 kHz, 

It is a fact that I do feel that 
everyone should have his day in court, 
and that extends to the one meggers 
as v^ell as the conservatives who are 
fundanne^ntally opposed to any and all 
change. 

In reviewing the situation natiorv 
wide, there appears to be some pat- 
terns emerging. \ think that, if we are 
going to be honest, we have to agree 
that there are some parts of the 
country that have different problems 
to face than others. Amateurs in the 
mountainous and hilly areas find sim- 
plex virtually useless and FM opera- 
tion in these places has tended to 
emphasize repeaters. Amateurs in flat 
land have developed much mone sim- 
plex and the number of simplex chan- 
nels in use in these areas is a function 
of the number of active FMers. This 
holds particularly true for the larger 
urban areas, most of which are in flat 
country. If you are going to get picky 
with me over this, let me explain that 
Los Angeles is truSy flat land, but with 
some mountains to hold up repeaters 
and remote base stations, just as New 
York has tall buildings for the same 
purpose. 

With 14 repeater channels in the 
146 MHz segment of the band and 13 
more channels in the 147 MHz seg- 
ment, all but the most densely popu- 
lated areas have enough channels to 
serve thenx In fact, only in the Los 
Angeles and New York areas has any 
great problem arisen as far as needing 
more than the 27 FM repeater chan- 
nels* Thus, the one meg problem 
would seem to be a matter of interest 
only to amateurs in those two areas 
and be of no more than academic 
interest to the rest of us fortunate 



enough not to live in the giant bee- 
hives. 

Frankly 1 see no need to think 
about or discuss the one meg situation 
outside of those two cities, I think we 
may see a lot more one meg activity in 
those cities if the repeater groups in 
those areas do not head off the 
problem by getti together. In fact, Los 
Angeles has gotten together and no 
one meg talk has ensued — which 
might be a rather broad hint to the 
New York repeater groups. 

FM and repeaters has developed 
oddly in New York. We have the 
phenomenon of one giant repeater, a 
few medium size repeater groups, and 
a host of splinter groups. The move of 
WR2AAA to a one meg split may 
change his pattern — and it would 
certainly appear that any change 
would be for the better If WA2SUR/ 
WR2AAA were to get many more 
users the timer would have to be put 
back to 1 5 seconds and the slight 
shreds of human conversation that 
occasionally have been emerging from 
it would be stilled. 

If all the Greater New York groups 
can suffer the ego deflation of getting 
together on a regular basis to hash out 
their problems, it is possible that a lot 
of the frustration and resentment 
which has been building could be 
cooled. We might find that some 
redistribution of activity could be 
made so that all of the 27 repeater 
channels could be used by a little bit 
more equally sized groups. Should 
seven fellows be able to hold a public 
repeater channel for themselves in 
New York? Should a small group in 
one part of the city be able to set up 
on a channel and dfemand that every- 
one else keep off? 

Now that 220 is beginning to 
open — with good inexpensive gear 
and even repeaters coming avail- 
able — it is possible that the New 
York repeater groups might interest 
some smaller groups that just don't 
want anyone else to talk with them to 
open up their 2m channels and move 
to 220. 

If the New York repeater groups 
ever did get together the way the 
Southern California groups did, they 
might be able tp consolidate and 
arrange things so some or even all of 
the splinter channel repeaters could 
find 3 home on one of the standard 27 
public channels. 

It is always possible that a study of 
the simplex channels — there are 13 of 
them in the 146—148 MHz seg- 
ments — would show that there are 
more than are needed and that some 
one meg or 990 MHz repeaters could 
be set up to use a few of these 
channels. Hopefully this extreme ac- 

(continued on page 108) 



JUNE 1973 



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W2NSD/1 {continued from a ^05} 

tion would be taken by smaller groups 
rather than by bigger ones, so visiting 
amateurs would stiM be able to call in 
on the regular channels, and have a 
chance of talking with most of the 
FMers, 

The FCC, in setting repeaters up to 
use the 146—148 segment of the 
band, apparently had in mind that 
most of the simplex, if not all of it, 
would move below 146 into the 145 
MHz segment Many amateurs feel 
that perhaps they know more about 
FM than the FCC and they are going 
to stick to 146.52 for the primary 
simplex channel. Note aside: the 
tC'22 transceiver received for test 
came through with 52/52 simplex 
crystals installed I Perhaps we're get- 
ting somewhere at long last. 

How about it. New York? 

BUSMAN'S HOLIDAY 

And what does the editor of an 
amateur radio magazine do over a 
rainy weekend? What else — he hams 
it up. 

Just before the new repeater regula- 
tions hit last October our managing 
editor Keith - W7DXX/1 - had the 
73 Radio Club repeater hooked up so 
users could access 10m and work 
some sideband DX, Then, for reasons 
which are totally inscrutable, the FCC 
decreed that there could be no more 
Interconnecting of 2m and 10 rigs, &o 
the 10m link had to be disabled. 

That was a pity, for the extended 
groundwave on 10m made it possible 
for amateurs almost anywhere in New 
England to talk over the WA1KG0 
2m repeater— and vice versa. With 
1 0m a near total disaster area due to a 
constipation of sun spots, the activity 
was a shot in the arm. And there 
certainly is no shortage of 2m chan 
nels in the forseeable future — so no 
one was being hurt and there were 
benefits to everyone involved. 

With the new regulations you can't 
interconnect 2m to the lower bands, 
but you still can use 222 MHz and 
above for this devious purpose, so I 
set out to see what I could do along 
this line. By the end of the weekend I 
had managed to surmount an impres- 
sive number of obstacles - like con- 
nectors that look like they should 
work, but don't — test equipment that 
has to be fixed — the works. But the 
result was a system which permits me 
to talk over my low band sideband 
station via 444 MHz, from a hand unit 
or the car — and from anywhere 
within several miles! What a blast that 
Isl 

There are some licensing details 
that will have to be followed up 
before more people can use the sys- 



tem -- but we'll get there. The new 
regs make it a lot more difficult to 
have fun, but it is still possible. Why 
the FCC should decide to throw un- 
necessary roadblocks up like that is 
anyone's guess. 

Now, let's see -^ how can we go 
about changing frequency or swinging 
that beam via the link? Hmmm. 

TIMING OUT 

One of the unfortunate aspects of 
FM repeaters is the inexorable time 
out feature. Sure, there are times of 
the day when this is necessary to keep 
one long-winded chap from driving a 
multitude of mobile ops up the wall 
with frustration. But there are also 
times of the day — or night — when it 
doesn't make a darned bit of differ- 
ence if someone starts talking about 
something of interest instead of mere- 
ly affirming the fact that some sort of 
tenuous contact is indeed possible. 

Now, to make this even worse, the 
accursed time out feature, an inven- 
tion of commercial FM repeaters 
which was set up as protection against 
a faulty repeater and not as a limita- 
tion on rag chewing, since such is not 
normally a part of that service, has 
been brought into amateur radio by 
the commercial twov^y ops who did 
most of the groundwork on ham 
rapeaters — and right on into the new 
regulations, where it is just as unneed- 
ed as many other of the ridiculous 
limitations that have been put upon 
us. 

Put it this way: why must a repeat- 
er in Sitka, Alaska time out a rag 
chewer at 4 a,m, after three minutes? 
This is what the rules have made into 
law. For that matter, why should a 
repeater in mid Manhattan be forced 
to shut down after three minutes at 4 
a.m,? 

The fact is that repeaters which are 
heavily used have, for the most part, 
installed timers to keep transmissions 
short. Repeaters which are rarely used 
have, for the most part, ignored timers 
since they are of absolutely no value 
to them. Isn't this a more reasonable 
approach than a blanket taw which 
applies to every repeater all the time? 
One aspect of FM repeater opera- 
tion that turns off a lot of operators is 
the lack of meaningful conversations, 
ril grant that these are difficult to 
come by on the low bands too, but at 
least there you can talk for a while 
when you get into something you 
enjoy and you don't find that you 
timed out somewhere in the middle of 
the conversation. 

Timers do a lot to enforce non- 
contact type of contacts. These are 
the contacts where nothing whatever 
is exchanged other than the informa- 
tion that a contact has been made. 
Try and explain the fun of that to 



your non-ham friends and see if you 
can do it without their becoming 
incredulous and thinking that you 
must be complete idioL 

You will probably have to explain 
quickly that this fantastic communica- 
tion system is not a total waste of 
time and nK>ney — it does occasiorh 
ally function in the public interest for 
reporting accidents or dry gas tanks of 
hams who have been paying more 
attention to "monitoring" the channel 
than to their cars. It does sound nice 
and official — and important — to an- 
nounce that W2NSD/1 is monitoring 
the channel. Big deaL 

It is probably unfair to make any- 
one feel guilty for spending their 
amateur radio life in the pursuit of 
communication less communications 
via FM repeaters when we have those 
vast hordes of DXers looking for 
pileups for the purpose of a signal 
report and a QSL More communica- 
tionless communications. 

Here vwe are with one of the best 
communicatJoris systems in the 
world — a means whereby people can 
talk directly with people anywhere in 
the world — and we hardly ever use it 
for communications at all. 

Put that in your damned timer and 
smoke it. 



SELECTIVE CALLING 

White the fishing expedition of 
most blind calls is fun — you never 
know who will answer your CQ on the 
low bands — or the equivalent of a CQ 
on FM - there must be something to 
be said for being able to get in touch 
with one specific friend when you 
want to» 

A selective catling system could be 
made to work — within limits — on 
the lower bands. Interference and skip 
conditions mi^t make most systems a 
lot le^ than dependable, but then this 
is amateur radio, not comnwrcial and 
we are in it for the fun involved, so 
most of us can probably accept less 
than perfection. 

On FM and via repeaters a calling 
system could be quite dependable, Td 
like to see some articles on simple 
calling systems for use with FM. There 
are enough small manufacturers 
around looking for likely products so 
I think that any relatively simple 
system might be attractive enough for 
them to build with a royalty arrange- 
ment to the inventor. 

While some of us are able to work 
with a repeater monitor going con- 
stantly in the background, I think that 
most of us can't I know that I would 
like to have some sort of calling 
system so my friends could alert me 
that they wanted to talk with me via 



108 



73 MAGAZINE 



one or more repeaters — some system 
which would not depend upon my 
having to monitor or on the chance 
that I might happen to call in at the 
same time as my friend happened to 
be listening. 

A two tone system is probably 
simple enough for both encoding and 
decoding to work successfully. All we 
need is the hardware design and we 
might get the idea off the ground. 

The ''go" signal could turn on the 
speaker — or ring my chimes — or, in 
the car, sound the horn. 

How about it? 



areas of the country to almost total 
disuse. 



WHAT ABOUT 
PRIVATE REPEATERS? 

The small groups that operate pri- 
vate repeaters have problems, no 
doubt about it For the most part 
they try to keep their channels quiet, 
but as more and more Clegg 27B's 
proliferate, secrecy is difficult to 
maintain. The Comcraft transceivers 
are even worse, for they tune the 
whole band, and they tune it with one 
fHp of the wrist. It takes a bit of doing 
to scan the whole two megs with the 
Clegg and this coufd preserve very 
small repeater groups from widespread 
detection. 

Once a public repeater comes on 
the private repeater channel, there is 
tittle the private group can do but 
shrug resignedly and look for some 
other open pair. The number of 
crystals involved can be substantial — 
particularly if, as is usually the case, 
the principles of the operation are 
heavily into Motorola gear You don't 
buy Hhose crystals for S3. 75- By the 
time you've bought crystals for a 
couple of mobile rigs, a couple of base 
stations, and a couple of hand units, 
you have run up a big bill Weli^ 
perhaps that is the price of snobbery 
and exclusivity, and it should be taken 
in stride. 

In areas where there are free repeat- 
er channels, the privates can move — 
but what about New York, where 
everything is full? Should the private 
group fight to hold a public channel 
for their restricted use — or should 
they bow to numbers and move on up 
to 220? 

Some groups are apparently think- 
ing of going the route of the remote 
bddSe, where all members of the group 
are listed as remote operators. This 
woufd have the advantage of the 
group being able to move entirely out 
of the repeater band and down below 
146.0 MHz. If they were all General 
or above in license, they cduld even 
use the 144—145 MHz segment of the 
band, which has faded away in most 



vmo's WHO 

The recent glut of controversial 
regulations wafting to us from the 
FCC has raised tempers and resent- 
ment. It has also cause no little 
frustration. We've been thinking in 
terms of the amateur division of the 
FCC as being the last word — and now 
that the last word is unacceptable to a 
lot of people, the question arises, 
where do we turn next? 

The next step is the Chairman of 
the FCC. Dean Burch. Unfortunately 
this apparently is an illusory next 
step, for letters sent to Mr, Burch end 
up right back on the desk in the 
amateur division, with no hunt that 
Mr. Bruch has even seen them. This is 
obviously no good. 

Well, since writing to Chairman 
Burch is a dead end, let's look up the 
ladder a bit more and see who is there. 
The FCC is managed by the Commu- 
nications Unit of the Commerce Com- 
mittee of the Senate. This is the 
comminee that does the hiring and 
firing. Let's take a look at this com- 
mittee and see if we have some help 
available from there* 

Warren L Magnuson (D- Wash J is 
the Chairman of the Commerce Com- 
mittee. Amateurs in Washington could 
do a lot worse than write or call 
Senator Magnuson and express thetr 
views of what has happened to the 
FCC amateur division. 

Senator John 0. Pastore (D-RI) is 
the Chairman of the Communications 
Unit and directs the activities of the 
radio industry in the U.S. Rhose 
Island amateurs please take notel 

Possibly the one key man for us alt 
is Senator Hovward Baker Jr. (TennJ 
who runs the amateur and CB division 
of the FCC, Tennessee amateurs 
should certainly let their man know 
what they think of the recent turn of 
FCC events* The rest of us can drop 
Senator Baker a letter and explain our 
problems to him and ask for his help* 
We can also ask our own senators to 
call Senator Baker and pass along our 
hopes that there will be some substan- 
tial changes in the FCC amateur divi* 
Sion which will result in an increase in 
sensitivity to our needs. 

You mi^t scour the bands for 
Tennessee stations and, when you find 
them, impress on them the impor- 
tance of their sitting right down and 
writing to Senator Baker, 

Ten Tec is in Tennessee and if you 
happen to be m touch with them you 
might suggest that as an important 
manufacturer in Senator Baker's state, 
they get in touch with the senator and 
impress on him that many amateurs 
feel that the FCC amateur division no 



longer has respect for amateurs and 
that this could lead to another 
CB-type situation if continued. 

NEW FCC COMMISSIOIMER 

The single, sole, only Commissioner 
to sign the perfidious repeater doc- 
ket — in my estimation the most de* 
structive piece of FCC rulemaking in 
the history of amateur radio - v\Hll be 
replaced this month by a new man, 
Nicholas Johnson, an LBJ appointee 
to the Commission, is being replaced 
by David Bradshaw, a Chicago lawyer, 
a member of John Connatly's Demo- 
crats for Nixon, and son-inlaw of W. 
Clement Stone, one of President 
Nixon's most lavish campaign sup- 
porters^ 

Surely at least some of our readers 
either knows Mr Bradshaw or knows 
someone who knows him well enough 
to get some word to him of the 
desperate plight of amateur radio. I 
will fly anywhere any time to explain 
what has happened and the disastrous 
results which are coming from it to an 
FCC Commissioner or a member of 
the senate committee running the 

Fca 

EVERETT NEW ASSISTANT CHIEF 

Richard H, Everett, who has been a 
legal advisor for the amateur and CB 
section of the FCC, has been named 
Assistant Chief of the Amateur and 
CJtizer^ Division. Dick has been with 
the Commission since 1956, when he 
joined it as a Law Enforcement Offi- 
cer, He moved to the amateur section 
in 1963. 

QSL CONTEST 

73 is offering fame, and a hint of 
fortune, to the winners of the month- 
ly QSL contest. The winners will be 
selected every month on the basis of 
the attractiveness and unusual ness of 
the cards. Get those neurones popping 
out there and come up with some 
different QSL's, 

CLICHE CONTEST 

Our shut-in readers are requested to 
take pad and pencil in hand, and start 
tuning the ham bands, making note of 
every ham cliche they hear. Let's 
make this art form legitimate by 
listing all of the most trite phrases in 
73. Send your lists to Trite, 73 Maga- 
zine, Peterborough NH 03458. 

Ops out of hearing range of 

KGQ'1979, the CB-type repeater near 
Newington, Connecticut may be able 
to get a very complete list of the most 
timeworn and sickening of old ham 
expressions by asking the next Con- 
necticut low band station he contacts 
to re broadcast KGQ-1979 for a few 
minutes. You'll hear the real McCoy! 

. , .Wayne 



JUNE 1973 



109 



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Start of message. I ncL SM-2tB 
features. Sh. wt. 4 lbs. 
(500 bit memory) , . . , . Si 79.50 
(800 bit memory) Si 98.50 




HF FREQUENCY 
STANDARD - FMS 3 
Mrirkers at b, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200 
ami 400 kH^. 400 kHz crystal. No 
unwanted markers. Latest low- 
power !Cs. Osc, and output buf- 
tt*rt*d, Sh wt, 2 lbs (Less Bat 
lertes) . , , . . ... . $33.95 

K'l ^ . , . S29.95 





CRICKET 1 
Thtf 'feature packed" moderate- 
ly prrreit keyer* Keyed Ume base, 
I am p^ool spacing, sideione/ 
vpedker. Rear controls for we»ght, 
speed, volume, tone, auto semi 
.itHo., lune. 115V ac or 12V dc. 
Sh. wi, 3 lbs. . . S49.95 




SPACE'MATIC21-B 

This SWITCHABLE keyer gives 
you "eight keyers-in-one." Rear 
switches can delete dot or dash 
memories or char./word spacing. 
I nstant start, self-completing dots, 
dashes and char./word spacing. 
Adj. weighting, sidetone/speaker, 
dot^dash memories. Iambic, 115V 
ac or 12V dc 
Sh. wt- 4 lbs. _...,,... $89.50 




ELECTRONIC FEATHER 
TOUQH KEY 

A completely so fid-state key. De- 
tects mere touch of finger. Use as 
single or twm lever key. Operates 
with all positive or negative 
ground digital keyers.Sh. wt, 2 
lbs- IDC Unit) S19.95 

AC Supply, S2.95 additional 
P.B. SW, S3.95 additional 



V. 



Phone: 703-321-7171 



114 



73 MAGAZINE 



EXCITING New PRODUCTS 




2-IVIET£R PRE AMP 

$72,50 Wired 

20 dB Gain, 2.5 N,F\ 12V 
dc, Size V x 1^/4" x ^a". 
Diode protected MOSFET. 
90-dav guarantee. Sh, wt, 4 
oz. Major Components 
Separately ShieJded, 




TONE ENCODER 
Eight pre-adiusted tones. 
Duration and Output ad 
justable, PLL circuitry for 
extreme stability, C^ioice 
of continuous or tone 
burst operation. Tone 
burst aperatlon requires no 
batteries. Easy to instaH. 
Includes three special 
single or dual tones* 

T co-K K,it ....,.* $31 .95 

Wired _ , _ $39.95 




TB«fi 0«*t*» 



TOUCH-TONE DIALER 

The electronic touch-tone 
dialer for home and car. 
It's safer and more accu- 
rate to use than a pad. 
Memory includes Access 
Code plus five phone num- 
bers^ Numbers easily up- 
dated* Built-rn monitor. 
Complete PTT operation 
with transmitter hold* 

TTD-4K 

........ WIREQ . $49.00 









*"** t IM IM ,!■ "< 


1 


u\ 


E 


<•* SS, 


jf 4 1 


H 


H 


1 r^ ^ar '^^y 


■ ^r 1 

■ ^ 1 


Ej 


hJ 




1 a 1 


1 


1 






^*j 


\r4. 


AilTS^p^TCH cronvai-c 



AUTO-PATCH CONSOLE 

This mobile or home con- 
sole includes all the fea- 
tures you need for com- 
plete auto-patch operation. 
A Touch-Tone Pad; an 
automatic dialer for send- 
ing one access code plus 
five Touch-Tone phone 
numbers; a single /dual tone 
burst encoder adjusted to 
your choice of frequency 
above 500 Hz, and a built 
in motor. Complete PTT 
operation v^ath one second 
transmitter hold* 

APC-4K Kit , $84-50 

APC-4A Wired .... S 98.50 



TOUCH-TONE DECODER 

A highly reliable tweK'e 
digit decoder with input 
protection, and PLL cir- 
cuitry for extremely stable 
operation. Heavy duty out- 
put relays, small size, plug- 
in circuit board- All these 
major features at an UN- 
BEATABLE price. 
TTD-12K Kit , . _ $89.50 
TTD*1 2 Wired . . . S129.50 

M1^ fN«IHIUlHa ■!«< 




S— year 



TOUCH-TONE PAD 
In tess than 15 minutes 
you can convert your por- 
table transceiver lo Touch- 
Tone operation* 

TTP-IK Wired $34.50 

TTP-4 Mini Kit S44.50 

PAD-PULSER 
Now you can also obtain 
pulsed operation from 
your Touch Tone Pad, 
Convert Touch Tone fre- 
quencies to decimal pulses 
at 2805 Hertz with just a 
flip of the switch. Option 
can be added to TTP-2/K, 
TTD-4/K and APC-4/K, 

PP-12K Kit $22.95 

PP-12Wired $29.95 

guarantees. Send for Catalog 




VHP FREQUENCY 
STANDARD- FMS 5 

Cal, receive and transmit 
crystals in ID, 6, 2 and 1 "4 
meter FM hands. Markers 
for all FM channels. Chet^k 
deviation. Precision 12 
MH/ crystal. No unwanred 
markers. Osc. and output 
buffered. Sh WT. 2 fbs. 
(Less Satterjes) $44.50 

Kit $37.50 




REPEATER ID 
Highly stable oscillator tor 
automatic timing, AC or 
DC Operation. ROM pro 
vides for more than 25 
characters, more than 
necessary for DC "any 
call" BPT. AUX is auto 
matfcaMy added lo ID if 
desired when main power 
fs lost. Toneburst opera 
tjon availat)Je, 
10^101 K Kit $49,95 

ID- 101 Wired/Tested 

S69.95 

ID-101R assembfed in ^V^' 
rack cabinet , , . . $109,00 




TONE DECODER 

Versatile single/ dual tone 
decoder. PLL circuiiry for 
extreme stability. 1 amp 
output relay can be reset 

automatically or manually. 
Monitor posttion. Adjus 
table sensitivity. Internal 
strap selects single or dual 
tone operation, 

TD'2K Kit $31.95 

TD-2 Wired , _ . _ $39.95 




-OF 



BANKAMERICARO! 



f/^///'///f fh 



master charge 



*m ■ Uf<«^p •« 



Data En j ^iriEErin E . Inc. 5554 ponRoyai Road 

Ravensworth Industnal Park, Springfield VA 221 SI 



JUNE 1973 



115 



one! 



THE COMCRAFT CTR-144 



■***-*^* 



'^•-*** 



*'*jijazr 



* 



L*.»l 



Made in U.S.A. 



The First AM-FM Solid-State 

Transceiver For Two Meters 

No longer is it necessary to choose between AM and FM on two meters. Now you can have 
both in one compact unit. Join the gang on the new FM repeaters yet still be able to "rag 
chew" with old friends either AM or FM anywhere in the two meter band. 

compare these 
features... 



TRANSMITTER: 

■ Buiri*m VFO (Frequency converted for stability) 

■ AM and FM both crystal and VFO 

■ Four transinJt crystal po&itiaris (8 MHz) 
m it watt iniHit AM and FM 

■ High level transmitter modulation on AM 

■ Bandpass coupled transmitter raquiring only final tune 
■ltd load 

m Three internal transmit crystal sockets with trimmers 
for netting 

■ Qm transmitter crystal sochtt on the front panel 

■ Devtatmn Itmiting 

■ 146.94 MHz crystal included 

RECEIVER: 

■ Double conversion 

■ Crystal controlled first conversion 
fl MOS FET receiver front end 

■ Integrated circuit iimiter and discriminator for FM 

■ Envelope detector and series gate noise cMpper for AM 

■ Built-in squelch tor bolh AM and FM 



WORK MORE REPEATERS WITH THE 

COMCRAR "REPEATER TWEETER" 

Model CTB-5 
TONE BURST 
GENERATOR 

5 TONES 



TNr n*w ComcrBh CTB S lone burtT Ji^nvrator atiavm The FM ooersto-r lo ^ot repesfmi 
rvqutrinf 4 iin^t tOrai, Ttw CTB % m>fia lh« ^ijinifar'i^ of mgift refK^lsf groufH and iMf 5 
M«Ktvt»l« }tmwi. IBOO, 1350. ?T0O. 2350 jnvd 240O Hz. txh ol ^^pch q rT«|unicy 
•iJFU%titMi AlKT, ■4iuitm>nt) arw pnwidnl tor detimtmn ofid durat^DO Tlq« CTS-S plu^ 
mto thfl mk ||«;h of youf irsnietimF and Iha rnK ■« than plugpd 4lto itw CTB-S, no 
oifiv ea^trMcttafni inw«f«d Tha CTB-S puts out ■ ^ icc«Kl bunn bbcH t<nw tha 
inirtoTviiBT k« kfvfd. ^^ta-i§i^ or dthfr<-i^». DcmnectArs funtith^d ite 'K »neh pliont 
oKtg »pi4 tocfc«l ifMth PTT cdreuiL 

Thr CT9-9i 4 vflfiClivctv dntgnKl wtth m bnHh«d akiinmnum fr^mi pnl ■nd « drfl ctfl 
&«n*ni.a«t M 3" X W 76"' K D 1-5 " 

Price: $34.95 shipped postpaid 



C«l^ifDrn4 fiMidtnH ACkf Sill for SliM Tn 
Wiffwity : 90 d«yi iHrQ Mid Wteir 



and f xrtonr ^r«ct f njcn 



■>'-'X vuO'*'"' 



V»^>S: 




1t6 



COMCRAFT COMPANY 

RO. BOX 2ee-GOLETA. CALIF. 330iy 

Write for more information or use READER SERVICE! 

73 MAGAZINE 










* * 



5^5 























THE REPEATER PRINCIPLE 



» 



^ 




CONFORMS TO LATEST FCC RULES • SOLID STATE REPEATER CONTROL SYSTEM • 
COMPATIBLE WITH ANY RECEIVER, TRANSMITTER, POWER, FREQUENCY AND 10 SYSTEM #3 
MINUTE TIME OUT • 5 SECOND DELAY DROP OUT • CARRIER OPERATED SENSOR • ID 
CONTROL • AUDIO INTEGRATION • OPTIONAL TONE BURST DECODER WITH AUDIO NOTCH 
FILTER • TELEPHONE REMOTE CONTROL • TONE DECODER VHP LINK REMOTE CONTROL • 
LOGGING CONTROL • 120 VOLT AC OPERATION WITH AUTOMATIC 12 VOLT DC SWITCHOVER 
• CYCLING TRICKLE CHARGER • FUNCTION STATUS DISPLAY LIGHTS AND CONTROLS • 
BUILT IN MONITOR AND SPEAKER • REMOTE RECEIVER SQUELCH • ALL FUNCTIONS ON 
PRINTED CIRCUIT CARDS • ADD NEW FUNCTIONS AT ANY TIME WITH BUILDING BLOCK 
CONCEPT* FLEXIBLE SYSTEMS FOR HIGHLY VERSATILE REPEATER STATION • 




TONE BURST DECODER 

NOTCH FILTER 

SHOWING OVER 70 DB 

ATTENUATION AT 1950 HZ 



UNIDYNE CORPORATION 



3224 Peachtree Road, IM.E., Atlanta, GA 30305 






1^^, 





















X" 















^V 






^X:V; 










117 



73 MAGAZINE 



IDLAND 

COMING 






« « 



s* ^- 



STRONG! 






J J 



A> 



« MToI? 



! 3-10 



A/ew 2-Meter, 
12-Channel VHF/FM Mobile Transceiver 

Midland, for years one of the top names in communications equipment, 
proudly introduces this sensational new 15-watt Amateur mobile. More power 
than most sets, it drives linear amplifiers to full output. And there's a low-power 
position switch for short-range 1-watt output. Instantaneous final protection 
circuit prevents damage from excessive VSWR. Receiver has multiple FE.T. 
front end with high "Q" resonator filter^ ceramic filters in LF, — superb selec- 
tivity, sensitivity, and bandpass characteristics. King-size illuminated S/RF 
meter, channel selector. Variable squelch, volume controls. ADL circuit main- 
tains deviation level without distortion. Crystals supplied for ,16-76, ,34-,94, 
and ,94 simplex. Each receive-and-transmit crystal has individual frequency 
trimmers. Equipped with connector for attaching tone burst and discriminator 
meter accessories. Includes dynamic mike and mounting hardware. Suggested 
price for Model 13-500 is only $249.95. 



Far informatiorr on Midland 
Amateur radio, write for 
our full- line brochure: 
P.O. Box 19032, Kansas City, 
Missouri 64141 



HAMTRONICS 

4033 BROWNSVILLE RD., 

TREVOSE, PA. 19047 

(215} 357-1400 • (215) 757-5300 



118 



73 MAGAZINE 



You asked for it** 

A low-cost 12-channel, 220 MHz 

FM mobile transceiver 



" 



MkUtH.Jkti4tr 



I ■ 



•• f 1 1- 1 



Arsi 



J4lDLAND 13-509 

to waffs RF output power 
Covers 220-225 MHz — crystals supplied for 223.0 MHz 

SUGGESTED PRICE $219.95 



Amateur users everywhere asked for 
it- Midland listened! And weVe brought 
our years of experience as a top name in 
communication equipment to the ama- 
teur field with this new 220 MHz trans- 
ceiver. Check the features: instanta- 
neous final protection circuit prevents 
damage from excessive VSWR. Com- 
plete multiple FET front end coupled 
with high Q resonator filter, ceramic 
filters in IF gives excellent selectivity, 



sensitivity and bandpass characteris- 
tics King-size back-lighted S/RF meter 
and channel selector. Variable squelch, 
volume controls. Low power switch for 
short range t1*watt output). ADL circuit. 
Indivlduat frequency trimmers for each 
receive and transmit crystal. Accessory 
connector for tone burst and discrimi- 
nator meter With mounting hardware 
and dynamic microphone. 



Write for Midland's full-line 
amateur radio brochure: P.O. Box 
19032, Kansas City, MO 64141 

DEALERS: inquire about an 
exclusive Midland amateur radio 
area franchise 



HAMTRONICS 

4033 BROWNSVILLE RD., 

TREVOSE, PA. 19047 

(215) 357-1400 • (215) 757-5300 



JUNE 1973 



119 



INTRODUCING: SUPER CRYSTAL 
The New DELUXE DIGITAL SYNTHESIZER from 






IVIFA22 



Version: $275.00 



4t 



SUPER* TRAMSMIT and RECEIVE OPERA- 
TION-SIMPLEX and REPEATER 
MODES in both versions. 

SUPER* READOUT - DIRECT DIGITAL 

READOUT — fast acting lever 
switches, 

SUPER* LOW SPURIOUS OUTPUT LEVEL 

— low spurious output is similar to a 
crystal output, not spurious laden as 
with some other units. 

SUPER* FAST ACTING CIRCUITS -- 0.15 

second typical settling time. 



MFA-2 Single Version: $210.00* 

SUPER * ACCURATE FREQUENCY CON- 
TROL - .0005% accuracy, both 
transmit and receive, on ail channels. 

SUPER* STABLE LOW DRIFT OUTPUT - 

20 Hz per degree C typical drift rate. 

SUPER* COVERAGE- FULL 2 METER 

BAND COVERAGE; 144.00 to 
147.99 MHz in 10 KHz steps. 

SUPER* LOW IMPEDANCE OUTPUTS - 50 
ohm output impedance allows lon^ 
cable runs, both transmit and receive, 
for trunk or remote units. 



SEND FOR FREE DETAILS TODAY ORDER DIRECT or THROUGH YOUR DEALER 

(•Add $3.00 per unit shipping charge. UPS areas. $5.00 otherwise. ILLINOIS RESIDENTS add 
5% Ulinois sales tax.) 



TONE BURST ENCODERS 

AND 

DECODERS 

* UP to 5 fixe^i tones 
(factory set) 

. ADJUSTABLE 

—Duration 
^Output 

. NO BATTERIES needed. 

. FULLY ADAPTABLE 

. EASY INSTALLATION 

. CQNTINUOUS TOME POSSIBLE 

• FULL I YEAR RP Warranty 

PRICES: 

T6-5 5 tone std. encoder 

(1800, 1950, 2100, 2250, 2400 Hz.) 

ST-2 Single tone decoder $37^50 

(Specify 1800, 1950, 2100, 2250, or 2400 Hz.) 

Special tones — Inquire 

Add $1. so/unit for shipping 
(Hi. residents add 5% tax) 




'■"^''W'^^i; 



»I»!»Vm4- 



$37.50 



A SPEECH COMPRESSOR 

THAT REALLY WORKS 






RPC 3,3U Internal Unit RPC-3C Cabinet Model 
($24.95) ($34.95) 

• Low distortion 
circuit. 

• Futfy wired & test- 
ed. NOT A KIT 

• Works with phone 

^^^^^' ^ RPC'3M Modute 

» Internal units & #niiii v «99 lini 

modules work mobile. CUHLT ^^z.mi) 

. FULL WARRANTY — ONE YEAR 

. INTRODUCTORY LOW PRICES 

(Hlinqis residents add 5% Sales Tax) 

Add $1.00/unit shipping ( RPC^3, 3U, 3M} 
Add S2,00/unit shipping (RPC'3C) 




ELECTRONICS 



BOX 1201B 
CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 61820 






120 



73 MAGAZINE 



10,400,000 Watts! 



EIMAC super-power tetrodes provide transmitter "building 

blocks" up to 10,4 megawatts, 100% modulated. 




1.3 megawatt carrier 100% modulated 



n 



EXCtTCn 



ONE 
EIMAC 





MODULATOR 



TWO 

EIMAC 

X 2170*1 



2.6 megawatt carrier 100% modulate 



eXOTEfl 



TWO 

EIMAC 

X-21S9's 

r - ~^ 

J mm 

1 AMFLIFJER 






_y^ 




IMOOUMTOill 



TWO 

IMoouMToni muAC 




megawan carrier 100% modulated 

BiMAw Mr ^^^.^ EJMAC 





For information on the X-21 59 and X-21 70 super- 
power tetrodes, contact the EIMAC Division of Varian. 
301 Industrial Way, San Carlos, California 94070. Or any 
of the more than 30 Varian /EIMAC Tube and Device 
Group Sales Offices throughout the world. 




X-21 59 




X-21 70 



division 

varian 



JUrjE 1973 



121 



THE SA TISFIERS 



rNOUE'S 2 METER FM GEAR 




IMAGINE: 



IC-22 IC-2t 



22 Ch. 24 Ch. 



1/10 W. 1/10 W. 




I 



On the NEW IC-22 . . . you'll get . . . 
22 Channel Unit for just $289.00! 

. • • 5 channels supplied 

- - , large built-in speaker 

. . . separate light indicators on squeich break & 

Xmitt 

• * . Quick release mobile mount included 

• . - l^eeti back lighting on front panel 

• , . super compact . . . 23/32'*X6"X8V»" 4.5 

lbs. 

. . . matching regulated, filtered ac supply 
available. 



On both the 21 and 22 , , . . 

Cross channel interference is virtually 
eliminated with 5 helical resonators in 
the RF amplifier coupled with 2 i.f. 
filters to virtually eliminate intermod. 

The difference of a truly hot RCVR with 
INOUE's MOS FET front end providing 
better than .4/iV/20db sensitivity. 



With the lC-2t youll enjoy . . . 

24 Channel Base-Mobile Unit for $389. 

. - . 7 channels supplied 

, , , dual voltage power supplies-* 
llO/220\'ac power supply and a regulated 
dc supply. 

. , , pa* tuning control — allows the power out* 
put to be aptimized over a wide frequency 
separation, 

* * , ri.t, control — offsets the receiver frequen- 
cy to bring in signals which are not properly 
calibrated. 

. • . s.w-r. bridge — built right into the front 
panel is an accurate s.w-r, bridge for 2- 
meter work. An invaluable aid for vhf 
antenna e?cperiments. 

, . * discriniinator meter ™ front panel meter aj» 
lows you to accurately tell ft you or other 
stations in the QSO are on frequency, 

, . . netting switch — this feature allows the 
lC-21 to listen to itself for calibration 
purposes, 

. . , modual construction — quicker servicing if 
needed, 

, , , optional rev. vfo, plug it in and find out 
what^s going on over the rest of the band. 



WARRANTY & SERVICING: When you buy from the AUTHORIZELI INOUE team listed 

?^^9^*/**" ^^^ ^®* ^"^ '^^^ ^^ warranty and s«rvicing you can count on, that*s backed ud 
oy the factory. ^ 

See the complete INOUE line at the authorized ICOM dealers listed below. 



ARtZONA 

EU Dee Entecpri^es 
12612 N. 28th Dr., Suite 3 
Phoenix, Ahzofia 8S029 
602-942^715 

CALfFOHNlA 

H«nry Radio 

11240W. Dlvmpic Blvd. 

Loi An^lM, Caiiftimi^ 90064 

21347T€70T 

ICOM FM Sates 

623 4 A Fountain Av«nge 

Hollvwood, Calif Ofnia 90038 

213-462-1504 

Sequciid Sterto 

773 8ih Si, 

Afcata, Catrfomia 95521 

707^22-0328 

DISTRIBUTED BYT 



Sichel EquipfTient Co. 

245 East Harris Ave. 

Soulh San Francr&co, California 94080 

41&^71-7500 

NEW MEXICO 

Robert Fosier Sales 
Box 193, Esievosa Star Rouie 
Tieheras, New Mexico 97069 
505-281 397S 

OKLAHOMA 

Blacks Radio Company 
413 N.E. 3Sth Teniae* 
Oklahoma Crty, Oklahoma 73105 
405-52&0193 

Devhn Electronics 
4817 E. 35th Ct. 
Tufsa. Okoahc^Tia 74130 
91S-742-7246 



TEXAS 

Bellaire Electronics Supply 
B204 eellaire Blvd. 
BeJtfljfe, Texas 77401 
713-667^294 

^^ectronics Center Inc. 
3939 N. Haskell 
Dallas, Texas 75204 
214 5262023 

Tnmbte Electronics 
2810 Alexandria 
Tyler, Texas 75701 
214^93 1123 

WASHINGTON 

ABC Communicatioi>s 
17541 15th N.€. 
Seanle. Washington 98155 
206-364^6410 



ABC Commiinications 
2002 M^rson Awe. 
Everett, Washington 98200 
206353-6616 

NHE Comffiumcations 

15112S.E.44ih 

Bellevue, Washington 98006 

206-747^421 

Progress Electronics 
852 Commerce Awe, 
Longi/iew, Washington 98632 
206-636^5100 




ICOMEAST 
ICOM-WEST 



Adirondack Radio Supply 

185 West Main Street, Amsterdam, NY 12010 

Box 331, Richardson, Texas 75080 

A Division of A.C.S. 

1251 170th ISJE, Bellevue. WA 98006 

Dealer inquiries invited 



122 



73 MAGAZINE 



(r 



The GAM Line 



~^ 



Famous for POWER . . . powerful performance 
VHF/Antennas • BASE/MOBILE 

144 to 160 MHz 








M 



TG 3S 

6.7 db 
$72.60 




TG-5S 

8.2 db 
$104.50 





TG-2 



4 



MP-34 



TG-2-R 3.7 db List 

TG-2 3.7 db List 

TG-4-MS 6.7 db List 

WIP-34 6.7 db List 



$33.00 
$22.05 
$55.00 
$34.65 




TG-4-MS 



14.9 db Omni-Directional Gain 

in System Performance 

(Using the TG-5S and the TG4-MS) 

GAIN OVER ISOTROPIC RADIATOR 



d^M 




i 




Electronics 



191 VARNEY STREET 
MANCHESTER NH 03102 
TEL. (603) 627-1010 



JUNE 1973 



123 




PAY TV 
ASSEMBLY 

$15.00 



A "Super Value" for the gadgeteer. A complete Pay TV installation made for ZENITH 
and all in onginal packing (3 cartons — wgt 36 lbs) and all unused. Operates on regufar 
115 volt 60 cycle power, A wealth of parts, easily removed due to long leads on 
components, most over one inch long. The 3 units consist of Translator, Adapter, 
Decoder. Transistors, tubes, solid state bridge power supply, geared clock motor, 35mm 
geared transport, time recorder, solenoid, relays, hundreds of small parts such as resistors, 
caps, etc* Our estimate as to cost to Zenith, approx $1,000 per set. Schematics with each 
purchase. One set of 3 units $15,00 wgt of 36 lbs. Special ... 3 sets $35 wgt of 106 lbs. 
All unused, original boxed, . 

COOLING FAN ^ 



u. 






I 



BARRAGE 
$12.00 

For the photo enthusiast, electronic industry, people cooler, etc. Brand new assembly 
made by HOWARD Industries, 3 fans per panel, 1 15 volt 60 cycle. Each fan good for 100 
cfm and have blade guards both sides of each fan. To reverse flow of air, mount panel 
backwards. All brand new, ready to use. Silver gray panel finish. Standard 19 inch panel, 
5 1/4 inches high. $12 per panel of 3 fans or 2 panels of 6 fans for only $20, Ship wgt 7 
lbs per paneL 

AM-FM STEREO RADIO $18.00 AS IS 

THESE ARE FACTORY REJECTS TAKEN OFF THE LINE FOR REWORKING BUT 
THEN THE FACTORY CLOSED. We have UNUSED Solid State AM-FM radios with 
built in AC supply, extra outlets for tape, mike, or turntable. We furnish the schematic. 
These units made for console installation. Each with minor defects but we can furnish 
most any part found defective. 



Postage extra on above. MESHNA PO Bx 62 E. Lynn Mass. 01904 



yfie^tma 






124 



73 MAGAZINE 




■ ?l At PtMt It SUWi V Sif 94 

tHJ n SK CI *1 f <,CH *Gi M il W PH as 



lOf^iQQiuipiliCfX 10 



100% AMERICAN MADE 
jHtiy I UI--FM 1 /fin /IP Hittlfti It'lrphont' 






^ndtSNtndrM 




M^ GT X ?« (Miit^ tiii>lt -n D£ ^ «nS M 94SJ^ 9^ 
+21 ACPJiWfflSUPPLV ,. 549^^ 

ill 7 E^irti ii4h vDur choiti fMDcki Nir] S I j M 

QUH SPECIAL PACKAGE PHIC£. SZ^IfS 



ID Wdli Uulfiut 
Itl GTX 1{| IwiHi bii<n HI OL f^j jiiit 141^ S14<l QS 

|3f ?EitriiEaiiv«Qf ci*ctlil*^«iul StJ 00 

REGULAR 5J4i 90 

OUfl Sf£j;jAj,f5ClCAGe PWCE 

P'tammU S 1 Q 00 Sut u 1 1;* 1 1 n^ 

HAMPAKldrACpnCTK 10 

PKhlfF Wth HAMPAK Md 

AC-52^Z00 





□ ct<b fmt iKhidiidp. 

ttfKhitfn iiOTi^i^t mrmtm, mfrr»iit hjtidk M im*§ 
dip} 



* FLASH • FLASH • FLASH * 

Look at whai you gei for NO REPEAT NO EXTRA 
CHARGE The GTX-2 md GTX200 have a super 
spfisiitve Dudi'Gate Men Fpt pre-amplifier BUf l-T IN the 
receivef front end for fuperb^ les& itian ,2S microvolt 
sensitivitv- THE BEST rv^tver now even betier' 



30 WATTS OUTPUT. ALL SOLID STATE (no tubes). 
TRUE FM {not Phase modulation) for superb audio 
quality 10 channels with 146.94/146,94 included. Three 
pole low pass filter on both transmit and receive. 1 watt 
low power position. Provision for tone encoder. Simple 
internal strapping prGvision allows mu I ti -channel use of 
any crystal, {GTX-2 and GTX-10) Microphone and 
mobile nnounting bracket supplied* G-10 glass boards, 
(GTX-2 and GTX-10) Profe^ional level construction by 
distinguished AvionEcs Mfg. — General Aviation Elec^ 
tfonics, Inc. The finest amateur FM transceiver available 
at any price. Size: 9x61/2x2 1/2. Weight 5 lbs* 
Current Drain: Receive: .09 amps. Transmit: High 5,0 
amps. Low 1.7 amps. 



{113 dB gain lay-down gleaming white fiberglass 
antenna 

(2) 6 dB gain lay-down gfeaming white fiberglass 
antenna 

(3) 9 dB gain lay-down gleaming white fiberglass 
antenna 

{4) 3 dB sailboat antenna, mounting hardware and 60' of 

marine white cable 
(51 Channels 68, 26, 28. 12 

PLEASE WRITE FOR OUR SPECIAL PACKAGE 
PRICES! 

Fuil 25 watts power, ALL SOLID STATE (no tubes) 
reliability. 10 channels with 6 1/2 pairs of crystals 
installed for calling and distress, weather, ship-to-ship, 
ship to coast and public and port operations. Self 
contained, compact, Pretuned. Vinyl covered unit is 
splash proof - impact, humidity and fungus resistant. 
Can be mounted in panel, on bulkhead, on or below 
table top with universal mounting bracket included. 
JUST CONNECT TWO WIRES and YOU'RE ready to 
OPERA TEf 



COMING SOONItf! Genave Touch-Tone Pad, 
Genave Repeater and MUCH MORE. 



REGENCY, CLEGG, MIDLAND, SBE, INOUE, GLADDING, MIIDA, CUSH CRAFT, DATA ENG. BIRD. OLIVER SWAN 
(KLM), TEEC SSTV, HY^G AIN, SAVOY, SIGNAL/ONE, B&K, LEADE R, MITS KENWOOD, TEMPO, TEN TEC, DX ENG„ 
MINI'PHODUCTS, SWAN, ETC, IN STOCK - PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTE. 



Digipet-60 Frequency Counter 



Sw Hot '77 CO nwvm^ 




' t * 



MffUB 



1 Ar 1 






■ fM27B 1 


* 


• 


^ 4 


II 1 




,/A 



Service Manual 
CX7-CX7A 
$29.00 ppd. 



1 KHz-60 MHz t130-160 MHz 
with optional converter) Reg. $299 

A frequency coonter with a range of t kHz ro 
60 MHz for 130 160 MHi when used with our 
Oigipet 160 converter^ With a resolution of 1 
kHz or 1 H£ (at 1 ms or 1 s gate ttmes). It can 
be operated on either ac or dc, with complete 
oveHoad protection. Plus a stability aging rate 
of 1 part in 10^ week. And the whole unit is a 
mere 7" deep by 2 1/2" high" Sup«rb 
pr^^iston quality at LESS THAN KIT 
PatCES. CaM or write for literaiyr^ and trade 
'n Of our LOW JNTROOyCTOHY PRICE. 1 
yeaf warranty. 

Ahc IWIIDA PRECISION AUTORANGtNG 
DIGITAL VOLT JWETERS (reg. S319i LESS 
THAN KIT PRICES, Compare before you 
buy! 1 YEAR WAaRANTY 



pwtt til ttwt Ott 



CLEGG FM-27BS 

(Reg. $479.95) 

Write for special deal? 

With Clegg AC 

(Reg. $559.00) 

Write for special deal ! 

Regency, Midland, 

Gladding 25, SBE, 

etc., also in stock. 

Please write for quote. 



■ 








1 


^ 


' 




■ 




S: 




J* 












r 




M 


■( 








r 




KENWOOD T-599- R-599 

Incomparable at any price* 

T-599 $395.00 

R-599 $345.00 




AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECT 



8817 S.W. 129 Tprraie-Miami. Fl. 33156 

Telephone - days (3051 233-3631 - nights and Kueekends - (3051 666-1347 

NO ONE ANYWHERE BEATS OUR DEAL! 




v^^iiAv,;^^^ 




FM TRANSCEIVER under $100.00 

YOU SUPPLY CASE - MIKE - SPEAKER - CONTROLS. 

144-220 TRANSMITTER KIT 
ANNOUNCING! A Breakthrough for the Homebrewer 



COMPLETE WITH DRILLED BOARD 



$29.95 



TYPICALLY 1 1/2 WATTS OUTPUT 

AT 12.6 VOLTS (1 WATT ON 220) 

ADJUSTABLE DEVIATIONS TO 10 

kHz 

AUDIO CLIPPJIMG AND ACTIVE 

FILTER 

CRYSTAL NETTING TRIMMER 

DOUBLE TUNED RF STAGES FOR 

A CLEAN SIGNAL 

STANDARD 12 MHz CRYSTALS (14 

MHz FOR 220) 

ZENER REGULATED OSCILLATOR 

PROVISfONS FOR METERING 
EACH RF STAGE 
PREDRILLED AND TINNED GLASS 

CIRCUIT BOARDS 

MEASURES ONLY 2" x.6" 



A one watt exciter using four RF transistors, two diad&s, and one integrated cfrcu^l. The RF 
transistors are operating well below their ratings allowing long keying periods without damage. 
The exciter may be used alone as a transmitter or with our PA 144 or 220 amplifier for a 15 
watt station. 




144-220 MODULAR R 

COMPLETE WITH DRILLED BOARD 




IVER KIT 




$59.95 



SENSITIVE NOISE OPERATIVE SQUELCH 

BETTER THAN .3 {M SENSITIVITY 
15 Khz BANDWIDTH 
ONE WATT AUDIO OUTPUT 
DUAL CONVERSION 10.7 Mhz AND 455 Khz IFs 
ALL IC EXCEPT FOR FRONT END 
STANDARD 45 Mhz CRYSTALS 
OPTIONAL CERAMIC FILTER 
OPERATES FROM 12 VOLTS NEGATIVE GROUND 



Measures only 4" x 6" 



Order TX-144 or 220-329.95; PA-144 or 220-$29.95; RX144 or 220-359.95. 

Receiver with 7 Khz ceramic filter — $65.95. Include $1.00 postage and handling for each 
kit ordered. New York state residents add 6% sales tax. 



•^ 






XMLM 


! 


B*NKA«IEn!iC*fl'D 


wH 


1 


^^m 


W I 1 




GINEERING 

320 Water Street POB 1921 
BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 13902 



126 



73 MAGAZINE 



NEW POWER-BOOSTER 



Measures 
7 X 9 X ZV2 




60-90 Watts 



WIRED 

AND 

TESTED 



TWO MODELS 

8005H 2-6 watts in 60-90 watts out 
t60 watts from your standard) 

8020H 10-25 watts in 60-90 watts out 
(Increase the power of your 
REGENCY by over 400%) 



8005 H 
8020H 



$159.95 
$129.95 



Not a kit but a completelv wired and tested power amplifier with automatic antenna switching. 
Uses NEW not surplus, balance emitter power transistors for missload protection. Large heat 
sink for cool operation. Less than 1 dB loss on receive. SO 239 connectors, nominal 50 ohm 

impedance. 



NEWRX-144CKIT 



For Repeaters or Those 
Who Need The Best 



$69.95 




With 10.7 Crystal Filter 



LOW CROSS MODULATION FRONT END 
10.7 Uhz CRYSTAL FILTER 
COR OUTPUT FOR CONTROL 
2 WATTS AUDIO OUTPUT 
LESS THAN .2jLtV SENSITIVITY 
MEASURES 4x6x1 inches 




We are now in our new location . . . please note new address . . 

HF ENGINEERING 

320 Water Street POB 1921 
BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 13902 




JUNE 1973 



127 



^ 



■■ 




Thia calculator chip hA» a full four 
function neireryi «fhlch is contrt^lled 
by four key«« +K {adds «ntry into mo- 
TnoryJ , ^ (subtract entry *r™n miimo- 
ry) p CH tci«ar niomorY--wlthout cl«ar- 
irvg r«at of ittqittmta) t RM {read nw 
ory or u»« ai entry) . 




13 digit display and cale* 
fisted decimal at 0,l,a,3r4i or 5 
leading xero lupp re salon 
B«vtn segin«nt muitlplex«4 output 
tru« credit miqn display 
■ingl« 28 pin chip 

Chip and d4t« $14.95 

Data only (refundable) -^ — 1.00 



MAN3M 



This lout coat npoxy encapiulate<l LSD 
is capable of displaying 10 digits 
9 distinct letters t and bears solld'^ 
state reliability, making it compa- 
tible «fith standard digital IC's. Its 
coiKpact spacing (5 digits per inch) » 
■aXea it ideal for pocket calculators 



Each» only 
Ten or nore 




5001 CALCULATOR 

40 pin calculator chip will addp^sttb^ 
tract p ttultlply, and divide. 12 digit 
display and calculate. Chain calcul* 
tlons. True credit balance aign out- 
put. Automatic overflow Indication* 
Fixed decimal point at 0^ 2, 3, or 4 
Leading sero suppression* Completa 
data supplied with chip. 

Chip and datat only $9.95 
Data only {refimdable) $1.00 



LED SPECIAL 



FLIQO 



.39 each 
3.50 for ton 
29.95 for 100 



SOCKETS 

Dual-lJi-Line^ftf^B^.,14 pin 40C each 

LG pin 45$ each 

High quality,'^^old plated 



I 



DM6BS0 (Sparry DD700 202) 7 eegment 
high voltage nixie driver, onlyS 1/75 



MC1013 BCL iSmc ff $1*00 

HC1023 ECL driver 2.00 

IIIC1Q39 ECI^TTL interface 2.00 

B8S0*9601-one shot multivibrator 1.00 



741 SPECIAL 



fully cofflpensated operational ampli- 
fier with data sheet and page of ap- 
plication notes covering the basic 




Al 

leads are plated witli gold or sol 
Orders for $5 or more will be sh 
ped prepaid. Add 3SC for handling 
postage for smaller orders, residents 
in California add sales tax. IC or- J 
dera ure shipped within two workdays 
of re<:eipt of order-kits are shipped 
wittT. ten days of receipt of order* 
510. VO nininv on C.O.D:** (phone in). 
(916) 9662111 .%^t.'-956aa 

P,0- ftoji J 
Cdf nichael 
"^41 \ fornia 
HQHE¥ BACK GUARANTEE ON ALL GOODS . .^ 



CD-2 Counter Kit 

Thia kit provides a highly eophlstlcated di«- 
play section Dftodule for clocks, coufitar or 
other numsrical display n^eds.Ths unit is ,0" 
wide and 4 3/8'' long. A single 5 volt power 
source powers both tho IC's and the display 
tube. It can attain typical count rates of up 
to 30 MHe and also has a lain|] test, aaasing 
all seven segments to light. Kit includes a 
two sided (with plated through holes) fiber" 
glass printed circuit board, a 7490 « a 747St 
a 7447, a DR2010 KCA Nupitron display tubSr 
compl e ta instruct ion a , and s nough Ho 1 sk pins 
for th* IC * a . . > , ♦ , . NOTE t boards can be sup** 
plied in a single panel of up to ten digits 
(with all interconnects) therefore r when or- 
dering please specify wether you want them in 
single panels or In ons multiple digit board 
Hot ipecifying will result in shipping delay 



Collate kit, only $10,95 
Fully aaaei&bled unit only 12.00 





CD -3 Counter Kit 



Can be prograsned to count to any modulus*^ 
2-9 for ons kit, 2-99 for two kits, etc* tfi«- 
eludes everything as in CD-2« teo resistors^ 
three diodes » but is without the 7475 quad- 
latch. Pull instructions included perfect 
for displaying seconds^ piinutes, hours, etc. 



Oovplete kitr only $9.9S 
{supplied in single panels only) 



8000 series 




8200 4 bit comparator 

aaiO a line to l llne aeleetox 

8230 parity generator/checker 

8223 256 bit proqrassaable BOM 

8230 8 input nultip lexer 

8233 2 input 4 bit multiplexer 

8242 4 bit comparator 

8251 BCD to decimal decoder 

8261 fast carry extender 

826G 2 input 4 bit Multiplexer 

8270 4 bit PI, SI, SO 

8271 4 bit shift registsr 

8274 10 bit PI r SO register 

8290 45^M! prese table decade counter 

8281 4SNC press table binary counter 

8290 pre set able decade counter 7 SMC 

8292 presetabls decade counter lOHC 

8520 25MC divide by "K" 2 to 15 

8551 tri state quad latch 

8570 8 bit 51,. PO 

8590 8 bit PI, 50 

8275 quad bistable latch 






HE531 
NE560 
1^£561 
HE56§ 
l€E566 
N1567 

709 

710 

711 

723 

747 

741 

LHlOO 

LK3()2 

LM308 

Uf311 

LII3&0 

Llf703 

Ln309K 

LM309K 




op amp T0-& 

phase lock loop OIP 

phase lock loop DIP 

phase lock loop TO-5 

function generator TO -5 

tone decoder TO-S 

op asip DIP 

popular op aap Dt^ 

voltage comparator OIF 

dual comparator DIP 

precision voltage rsgulator DIP 

dual 741 op anip ptP 

op amp TO-S 

positive DC regulator TO-5 

op aiip voltage follower TQ-5 

cotEparator tO-5 
2H audio asp DIP 
HF-IF amp epoxy TO* 5 
5V-200ifla poi^r supply TO-5 
5V-1A power supply module TO- 3 



$2.00 
3*25 
3.25 
3. 25 
4.00 
4.00 
1.00 
.45 
*50 
.40 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.2S 
2.00 
1.75 
1,75 
1.00 
1.00 
2.O0 



$2.50 



Silicon diodes {signal) only« 
1 foot (60) diodes 

Iepoxy transistors 

1to-5 and TO- 18 aixed 1 ounce (40+) — SI* 00 



1 a^ Silicon Itectifier 

minimua 200 PIV many much higher, comes in 

unbrandcd epoxy case C fully tested} 

. 15 frr Si. 00 



by NATIONAL 



Dynamic shift registers TO-5 only 



KH502 


dual 


50 


SIT 


$1,25 


M»506 


dual 


LOO 


BIT 


1.75 


MMS006 


dual 


ino 


BIT 


1,50 


MM5013 




1024 


BIT 


2.25 


KMSOlft 




S12 


BIT 


1.50 


Static 


shift registers 






HM504 


dual 


\h 


BIT 


1.50 


mSOS 


dual 


32 


BIT 


1.75 


HH550 


dual 


differentiai 






analog switch 




2.50 



CMOS 

C04001 quad 2-input 

€9400 2 luad 4 -input 

CD4012 dual 4-input 

CD4023 triple 3-input 



.75 
.75 
-75 
.75 



PR2010 by RCA 

A popular Mi^ltion digital display 
tube. This incandescent five volt 
seven segment device provides «6* 
high numeral which can be seen at 
a distance of 30 fast. The tube 
has a standard nine pin base (sot 
derable) and a left hand deciiwl 
point. 



$5.00 each 
S4.00 each for 5 or mnr* 



7400 


series 


7400 


% ,35 


74H53 


74HOO 


,50 


7454 


7401 


-35 


74L54 


74M01 


,50 


74L55 


7403 


.15 


7460 


7404 


.%% 


74L71 


74L04 


.50 


7472 


74H04 


.50 


74L72 


7405 


.35 


7473 


74H05 


.50 


74L73 


7413 0« 


.50 


7474 


7410 


-35 


74L74 


74 UO 


.50 


74II74 


74 HI I 


.60 


7476 


7413 


1.15 


74L78 


7420 


.35 


7480 


74L20 


*50 


7483 


741320 


.50 


7486 


74H22 


.fiO 


7489(8599) 


7430 


.35 


7490 


74U30 


.50 


7491 


7440 


.35 


7492 


74M40 


.50 


7493 


7441 


1.60 


7495 


7442 


1.30 


74L95 


7446 


1.75 


74107 


7447 


1.75 


74121 


7448 


1.15 


74123 


7450 


.35 


74153 


74H50 


.50 


74181 


74S1 


-35 


74192 


74L51 


.frO 


74193 


74H51 


-50 


74195 


7453 


.35 






.50 
-35 
.50 
.50 
.35 
,30 
-50 
-GO 
-65 
.90 
.65 
.90 
.90 
.70 

1.00 
.65 

1.30 

.ao 

3. so 
1.50 
1.15 
1.15 
1.15 
1.3S 
3.00 
.70 
1.60 

a. 00 

2.00 
3,75 

a. 50 

1.50 
1.10 



LEO'S 

MV-50 red emitting lO-40ma*2V $.39 



MV5020 red 



.45 



HV-lOB Visible red 5-7Diia • 3V .45 
3.5 as^ 400V rectifier Sl-25 

8 ^^ 400V SCR Ift 122D 1.00 



Precision 


real store -high 


quality] 


parts 


manufactured by Dale,Corninql 


Pyro filfiip 


Etc. 


. These are ell brand] 


new with full J 


Length leada 


■ 


82 




Dale 


6.511 Mt 


1 .15 


18.31c: 








.05 


20 -SK 








.05 


22*5K 








.05 


26. IK 








.05 


36. IK 








.OS 


36. 5K 








.05 


40, 2K 








.05 


s^m. 


.Ml 






.10 



128 



73 MAGAZINE 



i 



Mew 




IMOUS 



IC-22 2 meter FM at only $279.00 net. 

- 22 channel capability 

- Ready to go on 146.94-94, .34-M, A6-.7B, .76-76, .52-52, 

- 10 watt DC operation 

- Sensitii/ity better than 0.4 U V-20DB quieting ±8 KC ceramic IF filter 

- COR light shows signal without audio being on. 
-BIG 4" speaker 

- Size - 6 1/8'' wide, SYz" length. 27/' high 

- Many other features 

TOP 2 METER PERFORMANCE FROM 
THE PEOPLE WHO STARTED !T ALL 




EDfSSraiMC^ 



RADIO SUPPLY, INC 

185 West Main Street AMSTERDAM. NY 12010 
Phone 5 1S-S4 2-5350 tor fast prepaid shipment. 



JUNE 1973 



129 




m 




Equipment 



Many pieces ofequipment are in working displays. 
You can try it right in the store, ••••••••••• 

Dea/er inquiries are invited. No better dealer prices 
anywhere. ************************** 

WE LOVE "trade-ins". Whatever you've got, bring it in 

and we'll dicker with you. 

WRITE FOR 

OUR LATEST 

CATALOG 







ELECTRONICS 

500,000 ELECTRONIC PARTS 
ALWAYS IN STOCK 



491 RIVERSIDE AVENUE, MEDFORD, MASS. 

at Fellsway Shopping Plaza, Medford 
Junction of Route 16 and 28, right near Interstate 93 




130 



JUNE 1973 



f 



f 




radio 



WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTAWT ITEM A D 



R CAN SUPPLY? 



o 




ffwn© 




In addition to quality merchandise and fair prices Larry Webster offers 
FREE SERVICE FOR ONE FULL YEAR ON ANY RIG YOU BUY 
DURING JUNE. 

If you have any problems with a rig you buy from Webster Radio send it 
back UPS collect. We will repair it and send it back to you prepaid via 
UPS at absolutely NO COST TO YOU. Naturally, this service guarantee is 
void if you have abused your rig. 

Check out this month's specials at Webster Radio: 




146A 

$289.00 



826MA 

$398.00 





BUY NOW 

and receive 
your choice 
of 2 extra sets 
of crystals; 

a Mosely MM 144 

or 

a Ringo AR2 




SB-450 

^ $399.00 



"'-^A 



► »♦ 





Most important of all, if you buy this month you get the free one year 
service on your rig. 

2602 E. Ashland, Fresno, CA 93726 

Call: (209)224-5111 



BANKAMERrCAfTD 



'j^^dlV^'^^SrHi 




master charge 



j P.S. WE SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE USA FREE VIA UPS l 



JUNE 1973 



131 



-ym& 



sttniliier 
surplus 

specials! 



"X'y.'K'i- 



VLF Receiver transistorized 
0.1-99,9 KHz Djgitsl tuning. 
Electronic Eng. Co. 881 -M. 
Used, ExceL 50 lbs, , S185.00 






f:^^'>5:;;S:.:^:;:^{;K;:;-^;;5ysw^'^" ■ 



;^S'^^i#KgT^w>i-->f 





Blowers 110VAC Dual 2%" 
rotors new. 4 lbs ..... $2.95 
Dual 4" rotors, new, 9 lbs. 

Dual 6" rotors, new, 20 lbs. 



Jvvuai^-c^^S^. 




■Vi'-'iVf5li;>j;;i|;j;i; 






'^. 



.;^.v:^::>:' 



I h ... - . ib I 



Power Xfmr, pri: 1 1 7V 60 Hz 
sec; 6.3V 1 amp 12.6V T amp, 
7Q0VCT 35 ma, wt. 2 lbs. ea. 






Tuning drive, rt. angle 3 shafts 
%'' ti\a. X X" mfg. by James 
Millen. Unused with hdwre. 
wt.yjlb. ...... S1.25, 5/S5 




Antenna Reel RL-122 GRA4 
■;: 150' bare stranded copper 
I cable, clamps ea. end mtd. on 
isteel reef, 2 lbs, ,..,,, $1.00 










' ■>KiWT"W'>j'-.".-'-'j"T'^T'."j'.".'^',i.';<t'i':': 



'j^<>: 



1 J J - b d .. 




■ ■^ "i-""-.-!;- 



in-B"; 



.^■'.%'=v»',%'v:-»"':' 



Power Supply, low voltage, 
modular. In: 105- 125V 
47-63 Hz, regulated outputs: 
5, 15.-20, -30 VDC 1 amp. 
unused 6 lbs. .,...., $24,95 



m 






Limiting Amplifier AM-864/U, ^ 



peak limiting, audio frequency £~* 
amp, 5 tubes, tech man, 29 
lbs, new __. $11.95 L 



;:;;;:;-?;^V:^::^'rvr-:';:».v.v. 



;s:kK? 



9 fit 



© 
® 



» 



1 



:&d 



9 



.'?,'J-aK^^-^J'j\-.-j. ^•t. 







-^VW,r.;.j.;,Ql^J^:, 



,'r';:,-j-;'!-pt-:-;'»: 



S-l-Vl^'^^ - k ■< . 



VHF Multiphofie, AM 
112-128 MHz, rec cont 
tunable^ transmit on 6 xtal 
controfled channels, 13 tubes, 
less battery, ant. used, 8 lbs. 



* * m m It 



--■^■v'j'TV''T^V*'.'»V."'-' 



w 



m 

m 



SS: 






l.F, Oscillator, from 
T217/GR, combo of slug 
tuned coils and xtal switching 
covers 20-30 MHz in 100 
steps, includes 6 tubes and 20 
xtals in HC6/U holders, 6 lbs., 
















^— '^B ^'wTr^-tTa'^Vfi 




-Ji-fjJ'- 



'^ 



A mpl if ier- Converter AM 
1179/GRC, 50-100 MHz con 
tinuousfy tunable, 30 MHz 
output use with rec. above, 
wt. 10 lbs, used ..... $16.95 



-^ 



■•^;<^.i:-'co 



m Handfone HT~1, by 



1 -a ; B -I ^ i_r i r - - - r i P ■ i 






m 



t-% 



HaHJ-l 
crafters, dual conv, transistor- 
, ized AM single channel, xtaf 
I control, nom. 25-50 MHz, 3 
i lbs. used ....$10 



p 



Headset- microphone, H-63 

headset, 600 ohm, M51/UR 
waterproof carbon mic, 2 lbs. 



I t.i.r,"-! 'I-' 



C'_ '^'LK^j^JJ.^-*^-'*^ H"-*. K* .*.* . ' ; *.*. Ml *0* >I»! ' I^O^ •■ , 





Receiver R 257/U, 25-50^1 
MHz FM, single channel, duaf | 
conv,, xtal control, 21 tubes % 
with tech manual, 26 lbs ur^ I 



Electronic Vid Switch tubes 
6AN5. 5687, 2/5814 20 tran- 
sistors, zener regulated xfmr 
supply 6.3VAC in, -12 -35 
+ 12V DC out. new. 10 lbs. 

$4.50 



« p ■ i * 





-:<~t<.*i' 







Electron Tube Support, large 
glass air jacket with aluminum 
support rings by Match let t 
Labs, 7 lb 9 5/8 'I.D.x7", new 



.-I 



;'^:■^r■^:■y■'■^\x■X'■■H■r■?!w 



,* B-j-i.-j.-(.%-|,-_ 



^ 



1 r^ r B^B A ji i.'^B 4, ,*^ B B ■ B- l-'^a'j j j ^ ^ _ 



! J 1 1 I- - -i;- 



'j^B ■■*b"'-1 










^ 






132 



73 MAGAZINE 



i 



f 



WORLD ACCLAIMED 



UNIVERSAL TOWERS 

FREE STANDING ALUMINUM TOWER 



UGHTWBGHT - RUST FREE ^ EASY TO ASSEMBlf - RUGGED SIRENGTH 

FOR TV - FM . HAM RADIO - INDUSTRIAL INSTALLATIONS ^ FIRE - POLICE - MARINE - CB 

Anyone interested in a tower should consider the tremendous 
advantoges of aluminum over steel towers. 



WHEN IT COMES TO ANTENNA SYSTEMS 

ELECTRONIC DISTRIBUTORS, INC, 
originated Antenna System "packages'* 
over 23 years ago. These are 
RECOMMENDED matched systems 
designed to work together - yet with 
flexibility to meet YOUR needs. Many 
other comlxnations avail able, of course. 

THE BEST ANTENNA PACKAGES YET! 



Light Weight - In addition to its 
weight advantage^' aluminum offers 
maintenance free life time beauty. 
Eliminates painting and ugly rust 
inherent in steel lowers. 



EDI ^ 'STANDARD^' PACKAGE Ul 
Universal 1 1 AO Tower ** 
Universal 6-13 Hinge-Up Base 
Universal R4 1 Rotor Mount 
CDR AR22R Rotator * 
100 ft. Rotor Cable 
100 ft. RG8/U Foam Coax 

Complete with one of the following 
Hy-Gain TH2-MK3 , . Reg. $446 
Hy-Gain TH3JR , . 
Hy Gain Hy Quad . 
Hy-Gam 203 B A . . 
Hy^GainTH3-MK3 



140 



, Reg. $446. 
. Reg $476 

. Reg. $486. 
.Reg. $49i. 



*TR44 Rotator & Cable - Add . , 

*Ham-M Rotator & Cable - Add , 

**ll-50 (50*) Tower w/B22 Base - 



antennas: 
EDI $325. 
EDI $325. 
EDI $351. 
EDI $359, 
EDI $364. 
. , . .$ 29. 

$ 65. 

Adds 84. 



ALSO COMPLETE LINES ANTENNA SYSTEMS AND HAM GEAR 

Hy-Gain, Mosley, Telrex, Cushcraft, V/ilson, A/S, Newtronics, 
Collins, Drake, Galaxy, Hallicrafters, Ten-Tec. Tempo, Regency, 

Clegg, Tri-Ex, Rohn, etc., etc. 

iCECC revolving credit available) 

LET US QUOTE AND SUPPLY your EVERY need. ONE-STOP semce. 




Strength - Important to your 
choice of a tower Universal towers 
are tested for 80 m.p.h. winds and 
are designed to exceed that wind 
velocity. 



Easy Assembly - Child's play to 
assemble. You can easily assemble a 
toiver on the ground and walk it 
up, or assemlde it erect section by 
section. 



In addition to alt of the^ advan^ 
tages ^otal cost of a Universal 
Aluminum Tower is less than simi^ 
lar steel towers extended over the 
life of the tower. 



LET US RECOMMEND THE PRO 
PER TOWER FOR YOU. Request 
WHOLESALE catalog. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



^vqpvpqp*wwvwnH«wnB»B«« 



A«aife^eANir WHERE IN THE WORLD directly from 



y&y^ 





i^ 



-Communication Specialists for over 34 years — 
1%0 Peck Street, Muskegon, Michigan 49441 Tel. (616) 726-3196 



JUNE 1973 



133 



TO RAFfC *«OUKtS 

AU CmiEirS ADVAI4CE 

CMH. FH PHILA 



HANIFIN Electronics Co 

1666KinseYSt. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19124 



TELEPHCHE 
A at A COOE m 

PU-JilJ 



TEKTRONI>& TYPE 526 
COLOR -TELEVISION VEaORSCOPE 




526 COLOR TV VECTOR3C0PS 

To maiaurs tho hue And ssturft- 
tlon of color trsnsmlBBlOdi, 
Speca upon requeit |695,00 



TEKmONlX OSCILLOSCOPES 

531 DC-15nic ». „,, te95*O0 

535 DC-15inc , ••**, P95-OO 

535A DC-lSmc •»««.•..«... 85^0,00 

RJ05A DC-15«c ... ,,... 1395.00 

5*11 DC-30BIC ., *.... t595.00 

5^1A DC-30mc ,** ♦,, 1550*00 

543 DC-30«e ......«*«... «95.00 

5*15 DC-BOmc .*.,.««««,., ¥595. 00 

5^5A I>C-3Qnic ,♦, ,„. 1725-00 



All ocopeB 

are 
quotftd lefts 
Flug-lnsg 




PLUG IN UNITS 



IAS 

ILfiO 

53/5^A 
53/5^B 

D 
53c 
53/5*1 C 

C4 

D 
53/541 

S 
53/5^0 


5i/54H 

53/54JC 
1 
£. 
H 
If 
F 
I 

a 



tuAl Trsce |S95 

Spectrujo AnAlyzer . f995 

Pre Amp ..•.•».«.«, I55 

High Oa in . . * * 1 >65 

Hlgb Oaln ••.•«..«. 175 

Dual Tr«ce ,..«•«•• 4^^5 

Dual Trace •..**.•• iil75 

Dual Trace ,••••■•• :il95 

mfferentlal fll5 

Dirferentiai .,.••• 150 

JM-ffereRtlal •••••• 155 

Differential •»•••• f35 

Differential .,,... flOO 



High 
High 

Past 
Fsat 

Fast 



Gain 190 

Qaln »...•«... $100 

'^5 

ilOO 

ii*95 
;iDO 

*55 



Rise D0 •»..•• 
Rlie Hlsh Gain 
pour Trace ...*•••• 

Pulse Sainpling .... 
Rise Time Tester ,« 
Transistor Rise Tlnie$150 
Calibrated Recovery $85 
Differential Coaiparator 

$265 



.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
«00 
.00 
♦ 00 
.00 
.00 
*00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
,00 
,00 
*00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 

.00 



7553 K-3 PMCI3I0H UMIVBR3AL 
FOTSITIOHETEH 

(hmrdea direct reading potentlo- 
aeter for laboratory use. 0-1. 611 
volt a In 3 ranges. .01^ to .015)1 
aecuracr* *•««•••.. |249-00 



CAPACfTORS - MICA 



s 



MFD 
.000051 
.00010 
*0002 

•00039 

• 0005 

,00075 

.0039 

.00051 

.00015 



V0LT3 
6KV 
6KV 
6KV 

6m 
6kv 

6kv 
6kv 

lOKV 

20K7 



SIZE 
Ql 

01 
01 
Ql 
01 
01 
Gl 
02 
03 



I 



PRICE 
$2.95 
3-95 

-95 
.50 
^.50 
4.50 
9.50 
6.50 
19-95 



.001 rafd 25K7 18 Ainp • 1 mC 
1 CersTnlc terminal 
6i'^x 6"x U" footed., $2^.95 



CAPACITORS - OIL FILLED 



.£ mrd 50 KYDC 
GE llJFia6 

1 Porcelian temiinal 
13" 3c 13 J^' X 5i" ... 




♦^9.95 



.25 mfd 20 KVDC 
ASROVOX 

2 Poreellan terminals 
8" X 11" X H" 




$19.50 



PEED- THRO 
CAFACITOn 

1000 nifd 500 VDC 
ERIB #32T-005-15UO-10ai... $.69 




WtiM S&OAD BMD 
m PILTSBS 



1800-^5 to asp 507 Tlireadad 
aaek atg. Lua tara. 

• ....ti*95««, 



t2l5-095 10 Mip 5OT 

a*ck Btg« hug tara* 

• .....*H*95aA, 



COHFUm OHAEe SUGfflOI^^IC 
CAPACITORS 




MFD 

500 
1500 

aioo 

2500 

5000 

19,000 



V0LT3 

200 

40 

25 
200 

uo 
a5 



HFR 



PRICE EA 



GEN. INSTR, $1.00 

3Praoue^36d .75 

G.E.-^3P .75 

KALLOHY 1,50 

SPRAQUE-36D 1,25 

G,E.-^3P 2.00 



1 mfd 10 KVDC WeetinghouBe 

2 Poreellan termlnalB 



6" 



4'^ ..*. $19-50 



ii mfd 2000 YDC CF70E1EJ405K 
2 Poreellan terniinala 



J 3/^*" X 5" 3c 2t" 



# « . 



*3*50 



.5 mfd 1500 VDC CPT0B1EH504K 
2 Rubber terminals 
1 3/**" X 2 3/^*' X 1" $.75 




1 mfd 1000 VDC Aerovox 1009D 
2 Poreellan terminals 
1 3/^" X 2 1/8" X 1 1/B" . *.90 



8 mfd 600 VDC OE 23F1014 

2 Rubber terminala 

3 5/8" X 3i" Jt li' 



. . 



« . . 



$1*55 



7.5 mfd 236 VAC Sprague Clorlnol 
2 Bakelite terminals 



2'' X 2 3/^^*" 3C li" 



* . 



t a P P P 



$.95 



METALLIZED BATHTUB 
CAPACITORS 

AEROVQX P302N 

4 mfd 150 VDC 
2 Side terminals 
1" X 1 3/*)" X 3/^" 

10 nifd 150 Vro 
2 Side terminals 
2" X 1 3/^" X 3/4" 



Ips* 



. • . . . 



$1.25 



$2.45 



MINIATURE CERAMIC 



DISC TRIMBR 



49 



INTERORATED CIRCUIT 
SOCfCET 



^P 



ITFGAT 31%-lGlA H PHI DITaL DT LUE 
hlgb profile .375 h. dlalljl 
l^tbalata body Beats ail lUllt 

35aa, 100 fer|27.50 



SBfl CONDUCTORS 

1N3209 Silicon Rectifier 

lOOPHV 15A. $,60 

1K3210 Silicon Rectifier 

200P1IV 15A..*.. ,«.$.90 

2K2082 High Power Translator 

15A TD-36 ease,., $1.20 

Two 2N2082 Translators laounted 
on heat sink*. «*«« $2.25 



SINGLE PHASE FULL WAVE 
BRIDGE RECTIFIER 
Ilototola HDA 962-4 
10 amp 30OV 

$3*95 ea. 

10 for $35.00 




POVfEE TRANSFORMER WITH COMBIHATION 
FILAMENT in;NDINO 

3TANC0R P-6011 115 VAC 60cy Input 
Secondary: 35O-0*350TrAC 70Ba 
5.0 YAC 3.0Ampa C.T. 
6.3 7AC 2.5 A»pa C.T, 
Htg eentera 2 7/B" X 3 3/B" 
SPECIAL, ,..* + *« 4 $1.95 ^^* 






ERIE #53S'011A-5-5*l8 

5,5 to laiTOf. Printed circuit 

mount ...... •««..*. ...75^ ea. 

10 for $7.00 100 for $50.00 



TRIHHBH CAPACITOR 



8 to 50 ntnf K750 
SRIK #557-0OOS»a-50 r. . $.39 



^ 



STEP ^T TRANSFORMER 292-5653P1 
PRI: 110/115/120 VAC 
SEC; 240/270 VAC t 65O MA 

Sealed 4 5/8" x 4'' x 5"....*. $2. 95 



sreeuiLi 

ftSGULATED POWm SUPPLif. 36 VDC at 
1^ Aap. Input,. 115V 60 cy. All 
solid state, standard rack mount 
Hfgp by Sola for Anelex Corp^ 
Lika Naur Cond- 19*ir x 5"H x 13"D, 
irt. 65 Lbs .,, 159.95 



(319) n 



HANIFIN ELfCTRONICS ^O. 

1 666 Kinsay St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19124 



134 



SEND FOR FREE CATALOG 
GKT ON OUR MAILING LIST 



73 MAGAZINE 




Price 




Net to Amateurs 
Complete with Tubes 
Power Supply $9.95 

SMC XTALS-8333-9000 
Silk Screened Panel. 
18 Watts Output. 



SIX METER TRANSMITTER 

i^f • Mobile 

1 • Fixed Station 



e Emergency 
Aviation 



TUBE COMPLIMENT 

6U8 Oscillator Multiplier 
12AX7 Speech Amplifier 
2E26 Final Amplifier 
6BQ5 Modulator 



NOVICE TRANSMITTER 

25 WATTS INPUT 

BUILT IN POWER SUPPLY 

Priced 09 5 

TUBE COMPLIMENT ^W 

6AQ5 OSC. Net to Amateurs, 

6L6 FINAL AMP Complete with Tubes. 



^ 



^ TWO METER 
''TRANSMITTER 



8 WATTS INPUT 






TUBE COMPLIMENT 

6BA8 Osc-Mult 
6CX8 Final Amplifier 
6AQ5 Modulator 
12AX7 Speech Amp 



Price 



5995 



Net to Amateurs, 
Complete with Tubes< 
Power Supply $9.95 



ORDER BLANK 



SHIP TO 



STREET HO 



em TO 



ADDRESS 



CITY AND STATE 



SHiP VIA 



TOTAl PRICE 



MODEL NO 



QUAhiTifV 



JZi Xil-j 




DESCftlPTiOlV 




EXCELTRONICS RESEARCH LABS 

MANUFACTURERS OF ELECTRONIC DEVICES 
217-24 121st. Ave. Cambria Heights, N.Y. 11411 

Phone (212) 341-0096 




We have a love affair going 
with a beautiful schooner in the tropical 
Caribbean. And, we are looking for 30 ad- 
venturous guys and 30 congenial gals to 
share our decks for an experience under 
tropical sun kissed days and star spangled 
nights, Exuma, Saba, Gorda Cay, Mar- 
tinique, Grenada are yours to discover. 
Pink, whitg^ack sand beaches^: 
Crystglei^ waters'tbdip ii 



And, no social director to tag 
along . . . you make it on your own. Calypso, 
goombay and Antigua rock set our tempo. 
6 days and nights and your share from 
$175. See for yourself. We'll send you a 
free adventure brochure that will blow your 
mind. Write Cap'n Mike. P.O. Box 120, 
Miami Beach, Florida 33139. 




136 



73 MAGAZINE 



t,^-H^^. .*^-^^>"H-<5>-«-^^^^^* -tf?-^ *-^' M^*^-^'^-^^^^^^^'-^***^'*^^^' v^'*^^^^^-^:?"' ^^€^**^0^' u^^ '^-<^' 




WALLER ELECTRONICS 
TEST EQUIPMENT SALES 

P.O. Box 9913, Chevy Chase, Md. 20015 

Telephone 301-652-0996 



§t 



I * 



The ''TESCO— PAD'' has no 
tuned coils to go off frequency, 
no tuning necessary or even there! 
Its all in one "Black Box LC/ 
ready to flo. The *'TESCO-PAD 
has a 1 second hold-up for your 
transmitter, complete P.T*T, 
operation, available with dual 
audio output levels, 12 or 16 tone 
combinations. 

KIT $34.95 $39.95 Wired 

(Add $1*00 for 16 tone version) 
($2.00 for dual output version) 

{Add $1.00 for postage and haniSing. ) 





# 




SUPPLY - THE WALLER 60 AMP 12 



BRUTE FORCE IN A t2V 
VOLT SUPPLY! 

A bench power supply for ruobile equipment. This brute of a supply will run a 
mobile rig and even an amplifier from 1 10V ac. The output is a nominal 12V dc at 
50 amps and is usable to a full 60 with a slightly lower output voitage. The heart of 
this supply is a constant voltage transformer rated at a constant output of 60 amps. 
The supply features built in voltage and current metering. The Waller 12 volt 60 

amp supply is only $100 In kit form or $125 wired. 

This unit shippe d freight collect. 

Portable Tune Up Meter with cables to plug into Motorola, Link, GE, Standard, etc. 
This unit gives you the meter functions of the radio being tested. It also operates as 
a portable dc voltmeter with the following full scale ranges: 1.5, 5, 15, 50. 150, 
500, 1 KV with a special 3 volt range for GE Progress Line equipment. The UT-1 
can be set zero center for discriminator readings. Also featured In the UT-1 is a field 
strength meter. Place your order now. Kit form $42.50. Wired $49.95. Extra cables 

of your choice (specify rig) - $a.UU 63. 

($2.00 for postage and handling.) 



CALL OR WRITE WALLER NOW 




§ 



JUNE 1973 



137 




COMPUTER KEYBOARD W/ENCODER S35 

Another shipment just received* Afpha-numerrcs 
keyboard exceJIftnt condition. Once a^ain wi 
expect an early sellout. Prrce of $35 mcludes 
prepaid shipment in the US and shipment made 
withtn 24 hours of receipt of order. 



POWER TRANSFORMER 

1 1 5ac/1 2V@3 amps . . . $2.50 



IC SPECIAL - ONE MONTH ONLY 

Our regular $1 5 IC board with approx. 140 DIP 
fCs on them, with ident sheet. For one month 
only we are pricing them at $6.50 per board to 
reduce our inventory. #IC-S $6.50 Or 5 for $25 



COPPER CIRCUIT BOARD 

Brand new GE 2-sided glass epoxy G*10, the 
standard of the industry, bright and shiny new. 
6 X 12, $1.00. 12 X 12, $1.50. 



POWER AMP TRANSFORMER 

Brand new compact, regular 115 V 60 cycle 
input. Output of 40 VCT at 4 amps plus 
another winding 6V at 2.5 amps. Fine business 
for Power Amps, Logic or Op Atrip supply. 
$5,50 each or 5 for $25.00 



12VCT2AXFMR$1.50 

Regular 115 volt 60 cycle input. 12 volt 
transformers are always in demand, these are 
brand new. $1 .50 each or 10 for $12.00 



AM-FM RADIO $5.50 

Due to the West Coast ship strike they came in 
too late for the customer. Now it's your 
bargain. Use it as is or build it into your own 
cabinet, desk, wall, etc. Alt built, ready to use, 
with AC supply. To make It portable all you do 
is power it with a couple of "D" cells. Fully 
assembled solid state chassis with AC power 
supply, less speakers. Covers full AM as well as 
FM broadcast. The price. . .an astounding 
meager $5.50 



PISTON CAPS 1-8 jL(F 
3 for $1 .00 



Unused Military surplus. For hi freq. work. List 
price over $3,00 each. We have 1 size only, 
1-8 pp. No hardware. 
#73-18 3 for $1,00 




60-SECOND TIMER 

A bonanza for the photo lab or any require- 
ment for a precision spring-wound timer. May 
be set at any interval 0—60 seconds. Contacts 
rated at 15 amps. Contacts close while running 
and open at end of time interval. Brand new. 

$1.50 each, 10 for $12 



BATTERY ELIMINATOR- 
CHARGER 

Plugs into 115 volt 60 cycle and puts out 
approx. 12 volts DC 100 mils. Sufficient to 
power most any small transistor radio and also 
useful for charging small dry cells and smati 
ni-cad cells. Fully built, ready to use. 
$1 .00 each, 6 for $5.00 



455 KC IF ASSEMBLY 

Complete miniature 455kc IF* amp assembly, 
1.5 inches long, little over % inch square. Ready 
to um w/schem. Sim to Millar 8902 , * . . . 2.50 



RF FERRITE CORE CHOKE 



RF VACUUM 
SWITCH 

Made for the ART-13 
QOod for lOQ watts RF, 
no doubt handles muth 
more due to being un- 
derrated for the mili- 
tary . . . #71 17 3/2.00 




Hi-perrneability, ultra midget style, 
coated for moisture resistance, color 
coded. Used in xmtrs^ receivers, con- 
verters, TV -peaking. Brand new, 
worth 40^ each. Assortment of 1,8, 
27.0, 330 ^JIH. Pack of 30, $12 00 
value. 

#A 71 30/$ 1.00 180/$5,00 



« 



/ 



7400 SERIES I C GRAB BAG 

Mix of 7400 series DIP. unmarked untested. 
Some schematics provided ».,.,.. 10 for 1,00 

100 for 8.00 
1000 for 60.00 



yfie&nMQ^ 



UHF TRANSMITTER 

One of the later designs being released. Superb 
workmanship by HUGHES. Utilizes 3 pencil 
trtodes worth over $46.00, Looks like a 
'natural" for 220 mc transmitter as it's on 
.264mc now. Simple to lower freq. W/tubes & 
schematic. Built-m power supply 400 cycle 
would have to be changed. Measures only 
3x4x8 inches. Nice piece of scarce gear, easy to 
work on & first cla» condition,^ 
4 lbs. _.._,_ .#TA'40IC 15.00 



Postage extra on above. MESHNA PO 6x 62 E, Lynn Mass. 01904 



138 



73 MAGAZINE 






Numitron 5V 7-Seg 
Slimline or Regular 



ent 
$2,50 ea. 



i 



UJIIipilQJ 



ZM 1000 Neon $1.75 

G£ Y4075 25V Miniature 

$1 75 

GE Y 1936 24V Standard 

$1.75 

RAY CK 1905 Standard 

$1.75 

MAN.3 1 JV Miniature 
$3.S0 M. 10/130 

GIANT ALPHA NUMERIC 



B7971 



$roo 



OIL CAPS 16 MFD 5000 VOLT 
Rare find. $9.00 each 3/$25.00 



NOISE ACTUATED SWITCH $1.35 
Solid sfdte noise actuated switch fully wired, 
inclydes mike pick-up, amplifier^ SCR switch. 
Actuates by noise or whistle. Useful for burglar 
alarms, lamp lighter, etc. 15 ft range. 



LIGHT EMITTING DIODES 3/$1.00 
Ruby red, gold plated leads. With mercury cell 
for Instant testing. 



L 



AJpha-nun>efic keyboards. Excellent to new in condition. Styfes may vary slightly 
from picture. Two models available, one with ASCII encoder in base $55.00 postpaid 
in the U.S. Keyboard with no encodef in base $35.00 postpaid in U.S. 



KEY BOARDS 
$35.00 & $55.00 




RCA MEMORY STACK 32x32x9 

3rd generation, uFtra compact. Measures 1x4 
1/4x7, Brand new. $50.00 3 for S 126.00 



H.H. SCOTT MULTIPLEX 

Solid state brand new multiplex module w/ 
schematic. Possibility of conversion of various 
mono sets to stereo, $3.00 each 10 for $25. 00 





URC-11 WALKYTALKY 

243 MC 2 way radio, hand held, measures only 
3x4 inches. Used for survival in downed air- 
craft. Can be converted for other freqs. URC-1 1 
$15 each 3 for $40,00 



CHARACTER GENERATOR SETS $50 
64 bit ASC n Character Generator IC sets. 
Vertical scan set includes SK0002 kit, two 
MM502 and one NH0013C. 

Horizontal scan sets includes SK0001 kit, two 
MM502, and one NH0013C. 

Make your own CRT readout or use it for hard 
copy. 

Either set only $50 and includes 10 pages of 
info on character generators. 



IC BONANZA 

Brand new DTL dual inline (DIP) package, 
factory marked ceramic type. The price is 
too good to be true. Fully guaranteed and 
With specs, 

930 Dual 4 input NAND gate simitar to 7420 

931 Clocked flip flop 

932 Dual 4 input Expand Buff 

933 Dual 4 input expander 
936 Hex Inverter 

945 JK Ffip Flop 

946 Quad 2 input gate 
962 Triple 3 input gate 




f i 



* I 



*t 



tt 



»* 



f* 



741 to 
7440 
7460 
7405 

74110 
7400 
7410 




^1 iV^iiifii' 




15rf each. Buy Si 00 worth and deduct 10%. 



yfieAfm^ 



GIANT B-7971 NfXIES K1\ with 2 sockets 
and driver board containing hi voltage tran- 
sistors. Complete plug-in board as removed 
from operational equipment. Schematics in- 
cluded. Unbelievable but true . * . just $2.50 
for the complete package. - , -^25-10 S2,50 
B-7971 Nixie Only , $1.00 

Postage extra on above. MESHNA PO Bx B2 E. Lynn Mass. 01904 JVIASS. 01904 



JUNE 1973 



139 



v4Jt'2-FM RING© - 3.7S UK i., i:t3-i:ri M\y HKlft 'i^ftmdiKTiiNmir 

AfV-tD-i POLE - Vp u*n [Jii G*. ' - VII l|«T|**rr. :itHI*- U Dll, IBO'^** lilt 

At47i3 ^ 1 1 ELEMENT YaGIS - ifj] m Gmtnl - Uu In- \ wtirjilh l\y[mit^[ 



^4:2 JO 



4H7'22-P<>*EK fUXS-JfiUllCiiin! Un \147 i |"nniHkjiii|jl*lc >tiikuinKit . . . S4'L5ll 
4 144-4 - 4 t:LK'V^^:^ T Y .\(;l3i - '* IJH V.aii^l ^ l K\^ \Un( ur tAwi-f .Silk MuMiit . . $ y.U!^ 

flX-/2fl ^ 2a ELEMENT PX^ARBAVS - lU DH (iain! - CofisbJiir iW Hr,i Vrtyi md ImMucmf 
Fsalurcft - t::a»i IW Hackr-d Up Ttt fWt Klrtiimh Dynamite fur t>\'iii)i jiinl MiMiritKMmftf . . ,S2'5.n(* 

ASK fVH COMPLETE CUSff-CHAFT (ItTAUH:... WATlim, CumtEkCfAL, CB 



XmnbcT 
7100 

7¥n 

74^12 
T11J3 
744H 

7*06 
7UJT 
74«B 

lAm 

7MU 
7411 

741 a 
7(16 
7417 
74IB 
742(1 

742 L 
7423 
7*25 

7436 
7430 

7437 
7138 
7440 
7WI 
7442 
7413 



7+45 

74lt 
7*47 
744S 
7450 
7451 
7453 
7454 
7459 
7460 
7470 

7472 
7473 
T474 
7475 
7476 
744^l^ 
71H2 
748a 
74fl5 
741)6 

7490 
1491 
I4t2 

74^ 

74M 

74*5 

7496 

741fMI 

74I4H 

74HJS 

74107 

74i2l 
?41^S 

74 m 

74i41 
74145 
74150 
74t5l 
74153 
74154 

74155 
74156 
74157 
7tt5S 
74l64i 
74 161 
74l«2 
74163 
74164 
74166 



Ounnfiffv 



/Vr ttem 



I- lUit. liMJO 
')9 W* op 



^4 
^1 

3t 

2tt 
.36 

.38 
,1H 

M 

J4 
,60 
.Si 
.S4 
.M 
M 
M 
M 
M 

.40 

M 

M 

M 

JA 

IJa 

124 

1^4 

1.34 

L71 

LS4 

iJfl 
1.41 
.11 
.34 
M 
.U 
M 

M 

.41) 
.52 
.SS 
M\ 

I, Ml 
1.72 
l.5« 

,60 

L4a 

MS 

.»3 

U2 

1^3 

iJin 
.70 

.70 

,54 

.fpn 
.71 
1.311 
L75 
1.5(1 
2M 
1.30 
1.70 
2.75 

1.56 
1.46 
1^6 
IJ6 

12?0 
2.10 
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TKANSISTOftS AND IMntHLS 



IN271} 
IN911 
I MINI) 
iNl|H|2 
|M(MI3 

1\717\ 
lN7SftA 

£V3860 



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All [CTp tt* ittpplMd m 8-^ 14— » m 34-pija tHP IfltLil ia-lior) pUiriir m r^maht f^ri,^e 

exeirpl for ^E536, NESlO, Mlid SE540 ttjhtrli ttwnr' ill TO— 5 parLii^. Vall«||p lti^i(it(M« 
IM :^35, LM336 tti4 ^337 ^ mpplic^ m Tt»-3 ilhwucmd) p«rk««rr. 

Wfr pivr FREE dulfl uliPrta iipon nquFHl, h> *4i luf ilnHF dsLs dirjrl« lh«l vnii ^EK£L f«<'1l 
far Uitisc lintpd itrii Oial yttv an nol buyirtf. 



LED 7.SE<;HLM DISPLAY: 

l^ltlr 9y»tm£« hu £tOh rmpuiiilpd U'l ItHf tif LED Dn^t*!* Muf th>o rnfurrd tfirtr 
The l(alkit>n£ are am* afaiiiUc from tu at LJtfiv pncn. 



1-49 


5©- 99 


infi_4()9 


500-999 


t.ono up 


430 


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3,75 


3.40 


3.00 


4.7« 


430 


400 


3.65 


3,25 


4.50 


4.1S 


3.75 


3.40 


3.00 


7.75 


7.S0 


7.00 


6,73 


6.50 


7.75 


730 


7.00 


6.75 


630 


330 


335 


3,00 


2,73 


2.50 


3.50 


3.33 


3.0O 


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2.75 


330 


2.2S 


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^Sf^-1 
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SSS-2 
SSii.3 
SSS^4 
SSS-7 
SSS.9 
Minjirnna* 

Thd S!)S^7 and ,SSS'9 trp (he cariuitnri .33 in i-lNaraclrr )i<Hif;hl 7'SrKiiM-i)( ami uvrdlow 
dbtpby PMp«rti¥Bly, wilk drriiiiol ptHttf nii Oir l^fl jidiI widf Jiiiftte viewing. TJif!.SSS,| 
■nd SSSi-3 iLfv« ihf xamr fihy!iM'a( clitikfrminiih iL'iL till* ^S,S-7 ^iid 5i!^S'9 with in^iWiHHHl tifr* 
■tid 4ij£|ltly UiWf.t runrnl rw|iii return 1. Ifir ?»SS-1('. h (b^ saiiir an 0*n S^M-l pxc^l il h» 
> rfiJitn iciHleAil uC 1 dn'uiuil poillf, iiiAJtilig |l idiral fur uw in 3. ilifiial ilndk. TKr St^-3 
«Bii S^^4 «fw Ibe iwiv j^iitil .77 itt duuracttf deigiil "-SVg^irat ind iKrrflow dii^lAV 
mi|M<rt»^y, wtUi d.««-inul pciinl on Ui^ fifNt #^d rt^odibiiity up 1'> 10 i*T-t, *.41su imrfiided 
jWrrr IB ■ nrw rcdnerd prire tia oar Inruidii^ieeBt 7-Sc|^kd1 Dinptji^. 



P*ek4i|r ttf ft. [ ' S Will ^iiTrrnl hmitji^ rrw^m^ . 



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MOLEV IC ISOCKET PfNS: r<ir th*wf ntomwtuni pin.«^ ia«trjyt u| «i4<i<iffu^ ycuFlCV u» 
K b Mf J n Soid m vpnlniioaA' jitnp* m nwUiple* q( 100 piii« nnly. 



100 for f 1,00 

500 f ft f 14.20 
900 tat $7.40 



200 fori 130 

600 tnt |5.tlO 
10U0 fur $8.20 



300 fur 12,60 too for f 3.40 

700 lo r 1 5 . n 8 00 fell- S6,60 

»rli addiltoiiAl l.OOOf 730 



IW^tn4ijiir SOCKETS, Brnn^ ww wiili i^ti pliT»l piw. 



1 4 Plh 


15 Pin 


( 4 Pin 


( fi Pill 


( 1 Pin 


16 Pin 



) Sfl(drr 

•f Wirr Wr,i|» 
ILInK-d^Eiitry 



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Cop 



1-49 

.50 
.55 
,55 
.60 
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100-499 500-999 1.0011 tij> 



.43 
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.40 
.45 
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.5 
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.35 
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.25 
.30 
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HTA;\i,Uli la.AMSFUR.MEIlS: td#«lliH' lur wilb LM 



P4t180. IS^aVCT. I Hfip ... 

l'4it3L 6:3VCT. 1.2 Mnp ■ 



$3.ort 
*17r> 



1 1 F ^ T < ( \ IlS : « iLrrfHd ^vfP' i*^U bnird ro^ilrrK I U" k«l> willi a dk^fulioit iqi 

la 241 WmILv l>^iflwd fur a.v witb TO j pvluter, 

1-49 50^ 99 1 00-499^ $0#-9^9 JO 00 yp 

T^pr ■■. ■-■ : :' ^ I jii ^ J M ijiit ^mi ,8ii 



\Ll.rA-B8VnLF3 Mi^CR ADE <5.b*nd> RESISTORS. Vnj of the 81 STA.NDAaiJ 
im *dmM tfwo 170 m 22MO ^ w 4 1 ATT, EACH .........■■..■ -tOJiS 

i }\[ WUC DISC tIAP.ACmmS. T>pp 5t. \ huMiB \ IM 

5, 73. 10, 12, 15, 20, 21 25, 27. .10, 33, 39, 5IK 56, 68. 73, 82, im, 120. 1541, t84>. 2lMt 
2:;ri. 350« 2711, Mm. 3:01, 360, 3911, 1*0. 5tHl STjO, 61UK 7.111, H2(l, 1000. 1200, 150i», 
IR(HX 2000. 2200, 2500, 2700, 31*00. 3:iO0. 39IHI. 470O, 5000^ F. 

iMniiJ'" ka(:hV.* "J^J,V.V.V.^.Vfi J I ii)iiK,'KAi:ji '.l\1\[^'.[[]l'.',"i$.\2 



LOW VOLTAGE IJlStS, Typ.. (TK, 

\.^¥. JV , . . . S.2.1 (i.47MF, 3V 

J^E. lOV SJ2 2.2ME.3V . 



1- ■■ 1 I 



S.2r* 0.2mE. lOV „,,,..,..!. 20 
S.30 (UHmE, 1*V $.l\i 



ELECTTROL^Tir. rAPAr.lTCIRS' V(i ha(ur4. arr ai-jihhir in hnih, uiit or uprifrUl (PC 
BcMrdji rntiuiiL PI^bjv inAacair ytitir rhitw^. 

ItljF, tSV ,,..S.10 3C|iF. 3SV , . . , S30 %E. 30V ...,,„ ,_,f,|0 

3t^r, 15V ..**«. _|J0 5I^F,33V.. S.20 UI|iF.50V .....LIS 

SOmE, 15V ..___. *J0 |OO^F,35V ..,...,,1.29 3«|jE. 50V .f.:^! 

imiiE. ISV ..f.JO 50fl|*F.35V ,,.,,.».r40 Sl^^. 50V ..|.2ft 

221^1 F, I SV ..$A5 |00C|iF.35V S.50 i0l%iE,50V t-2si 

50l*iF, |5\ ........ $,^ liiF. 50V $At\ 20ll|iF. 5JiV ,. I4fi 

IDOCIfF. 15V 130 ^F.jOV ,....I.EO 5«%iF,S0V ..,vt.55 

2<yF. 25V ,.,,.....$.15 %if,SOV ...„^....SJO 



ILItHS: Klitrd fimtoi \FT 3ll itiVn. litltrmbr citrrk tir tiHilu-t nrdrr nilb oinl'PT. 
BattkAiHrfirHud md MuterrhttriE?;^ uf ^«4miiie, 41 idtvttirtQg in now dufiF by rdtnpiicr 
Ovrfrforr. tht rnUnvinc itmd«rd rhcrf^ wdl aiiEiwiutkAlly b<* ■ddrj lo your onfrr.. 

( r ^'our Rif rrbuidiw lotil h brl^rrti: 

SPECIAL CHAaCES 



$ (UKI 1 4.99 


add 


SLfin 


$ 5.0{* ^ $2L99 


add 


10.75 


1 25.0a- $19.99 


add 


£(»,50 


$ 5U0()-S99.99 


GdJ 


50.25 


SI DO. (10 alid up 


idd 


«0.O(l 



COD 


II.IHI 


idditilkQtl 


Air Mail 


10.511 


additiDcul 


pDhtal (ntAirjinrc^ 


10,25 


iiiiditii;>l)ji( 


^pmial lluliviiry 


$0.75 


addiLi<}iLn( 



Willi |ltl« upw ir\'<.tfm jUI Uir[tiTi4'ii(^ wd( tx^ E.O^H. dcjtiiiiiljnti^ t^ta Ftrpi CLils or UPS 
tyour cliukc). IbiRMS duq^? jncludi; jdiipj^iUft, b^Ditliiiii, and uii!ijnuif.r. 




s®!L3D mMi $i($'aMia mt 



P, O. BOK ?73 • COLUMBIA, MiSSOURt 6520^ 
TW3C 9V0.760'M53 • PHONE 3t4 - 443-3673 



BANKAVERlCAia 



uti^twae^ev 



cmDKR mSK 
1-801^25-298 ( 
i.804l'32S-1595 



master charge 



►J 



140 



73 MAGAZINE 



MILITARY ELECTRONICS 



24 PAGES, crsmmed wiTh Gov't Syrpfuf Electronic Gsaf tNe Bights? 
Bar^m Buys in Am«rtc3* It w*l* pay yo4i to I Cpfun in*' 
iot voyi copy - Refunded ^ith v&uf Um order, li- — — 



BRAND NEW IC -645 TRANSCEIVER 

EASJLY CONVERTED FOR 
420MC OPERATION 

This equipment originally 
cost over $1000. You gtt 
«li in ongmal factory carton. 




ntn 



•€^a«3 




Dependable Two Way Communication more than ISmtles. 

• FREQUENCY RANGE; About 435 m 500 Meg^icydes, 

• TRANSMrTTER hi 4 tubes: WE 316A, 2 6F6, 7F7. 

• RECEIVER ha^ 1 I Tubes: 2-9S5, 4-7H7, 2'7^^, 3-7F7. 

• RECEIVER LF-: 40 MegacycJei. 

Makes wonderful mobile or fixed ng fof 420 lo 500 Mc. 
Easily converted for phone or CW operation 



SPECtAL PACKAGE OFFER' 



BC &45 Transceiver, Dynamotor and all BRAND NEW, 
accessories beJow, including conversion m- while stocks 
structions for Citizens Band. last $26.35 

F,0,B. NY City or Ogden, UT for Savings on Frel^t Cttarge*, 



Accessories for BC-645 
Mounling for eC-645 trans- 
ceiver 

PE 101C Dynarrtolor. 12-14 V 
(easily converted to 6 volts), 
Motini+ng for PE-IOTC Dyna- 

TRANSCEIVER ONLY 



morof 

UHF antenna assembrres tset of 

2) 

Complete set ot 11 connectors 

Control Bolt BC-646 

Mounting for BC-6'46 clr box. 



$16.95 



SCR-274-N, ARC-5 COMMAND SET HQ! 



Frcq. 

Raagc 

RECEIVERS 

190-550 Kc 
6-9.1 Mc 
1.5-3 Mc 
TRANSMITTERS 
4-5.3 Mc 
5-3-7 Mc 



Type Ekc, 

Complete Used 
with Tubes 

BC4 53 $!6.95 
BC45S — 

R'25 — 
Coinplete with Tubes 

BC-457 $8,95 

BC4Sd $8,95 



Like 
New 



BRAND 
NEW 



$23.50 — 

— $21.50 

— $11.95 

— $11.95 



CRT 

AGEING & 
CHECKING 
TESTER 

$6.95 




WILLARD 2- VOLT 
STORAGE BATTERY 
(Model 20-2) 

Rated at 20 ampere 
hours. Compact^ 
rechargeable, fine 
for models. 



^^a I V 




BC*120B^C RECEIVER Aircraft Beacon Receiver 200 
to 400 Kc, Operates froTn 24V DC 1,5A. Continuous tuning, 
vol control, on-off switch and phone jack. Very sensitive. 
Com pact 
Complete with tubes, MEW SI 2.50 




ARC'RIIA Modern Q-5 Receiver 190 - 550 Khz $10.95 

ARC R22 540 1600 Khz Receiver kfljith lutiing graph$15,95 
R-4/ARR-2 Receiver 234 ^ 358 Mliz, T 1 tubes, M£W SE.SS 



BC-348 Rddio Recerver , 
BC'31 2 Radio Receiver . 
AN/ARN'7 Receiver . . . 



$50.5^ 
$69.50 

$19.50 



BC-604 FM TRANSMITTER 20 to 27.9 Mc, Oui- 
pi/t approx 30 wiTts. 10 crystal controlled chan- 
nels, Compleie v\tiih tubes. 

HBH, _ = =..,-,. S9.S0 





BC'BQ3 FM RECEIVER 

Converted tor 35—50 Mhz. 10 preset pushbytion 
channels or manttat tuning. Complete with 10 tubes. 

checked out, like new...*. .*.*w^S39.50 



AC Power Supply, New . . 

DM-34 12V Powder Sytjpiv, Nevv , . . . 

DM -36 24V Povwer Supply. Emc. Used 

Technical Manual .,..,.. 

Spt of 10 tubes, for BC'603 RecervF' 



S14,95 
S 4,45 
S 2 25 
S 250 
S 5.95 



AN/APR-4Y FM & AM RECEIVER 

^TB'" for Satellite Tracking! 
High precision lab instfument, for nnonitoting 
and measuring frequency and relative signal 

strength, 38 lo 4000 Mc In 5 
tuning ranges. For llOv 60 
cycle AC. Burlt-in power supply. 
Original circuit diagram includ- 
ed. Checked out. Perfect. 
LIKE NEW S79.&0 

All tuning units available tor a^ 
bove. Price upon request. 




TG34A CODE KEYER, se»<ontained, du!omat<c, lepro 
duces code pracifce itgnals from paper lape. 5 to 12 WPM 
Buflt-rn speaker. Brand new with tech manual, taketip n^! 

ai>d AC Irne cord *.,.*.. S24.50 

Code pfWJtice (ape* for above PUR. 





WIN - 26Y 
RECEIVER 



Like New $13.50 
New $15.25 



sir 



Remote control 
commerciat type 



Design^ for Marine & Aifcrafl mstaf la- 
lion, Also fine for home use. Cpnirnuoui 
tuntn§ from MW-28C Com rot box. Com- 
plete With 34 voH DC Dvr^amoior^ 
M(Sl-268 Radio Receiver, 150^325 KC. 
3259-695 KC. 3-4.7 Mc, Complete with 
tubes, and dynamatof . 



navigational receiver 

ACCESSORIES FOR ABOVE AVAILABLE FROM STOCK 



ARC 5 VHP RECEIVER, TRANSMITTER, MODULATOR 100 156 Mhz 
R 28 RECEIVER wuh iube& and crystal, 

T-23 TRANSMITTER with tubes and crystals. 

Srand New in Orpgir^al Carton ,... $23.50 

MP 7 MODULATOR whh tubes. 

■cKtcucni xj seo . . ^ . ..^^ < ■ « .*■««■* ■ ■ » « ■ ■ ^.a^u »*«»*■ *«***-^ «^ lo.ijy 

Sei of Plugs for MD-7 S8,S0 





LM FREQUENCY METER 

Fine general ptirpu^c Navy unit t25 to 20,000 
Hz. Operates on 12 or 14V dc. Complete with 
tube5, crystal calibration book. Checked ottt. 
Excellent Used 558.50 

A^ above, less book $22.50 



APNl FM TRANSCEIVER 400-450 Mc. 
Freq. modulated by moving coil trans- 
ducer. Easity converied for radio con- 
trol or 70 cms. Complete with 14 
tubes, dyn. BRAND NEW $9^5 





HANDMIKE 

Bu§9ed, heavy-dutv carbon handmike with press-to- 
tslk switcii. Equipped with 4-ft cord & phone plug. 

SPECIAL 
NEW, Boated Each Si. 88 2 foi' S3. 25 



HEADSET Low impifdance. With large chamois ^ar cushions. 
4-ft cord and plug. Reg, Si 2.S0. Our SpeciaF Price S2.9S 

Le%$ ear cushions ^ , $1.95 

High impedance adaptor for above . $ .69 





BC-604 FM TRANSMITTER 20 to 27.9 Mc 
Output approx, 30 watts. lOcrysial controlled 
channels. Complete with lubes. 
NEW .».»... .512:50 



SCR-625MiNe detector 

locates any nnetal buried approx. 2-ft 

in ground or water. Easy to operate. 

Our Special Price, less batteries 



$44.50 



SCR-522 TRANSMITTER/RECEIVER $36 gn 

Desianed to operate Uom 100to156mc *MW-au 



CATHODE RAY TUBES All New in Original Carton 
STANDARD MAKE 
3AP1* S2.95 5MP1 .82,75 

3FP7*..._ SK45 ea. 9GP7 S4,95 

3CP1 _..,SK98ea. ' Sold in Lois of 3 Dniy 

3^' Shield..... SI. 49 5" Shield.... ......$3.25 

3" and 5" Sockets B94 ea, 

3" ^nd 5" lubes sold with shields and sockets only 



-© 



TEHMI^: F.Q.B. NYC. 2B% depoit with oi-der, balanceCOD or reminsnce 
In futl. MINIMUM ORDER S6i,00. Sub^act to prior sale and price c^4nge 

G&G RADIO UECTRONICS COMPANY 

45-47 Warren St. Und Fl.) New Vork. NY. 10007 Ph 212-267 4605 



JUNE 1973 



141 



IB 



'HAM>^UHF400IV1C 
HIGH POWER 
TRANSISTORS 

D 



ip J« J^ 




Lowtit Prici 




0*mniS li*w 



"DIP" P 



By RCA. or equal 2N3&32, 
NPN, 23 watts, 3 iunp4, 
TO- 60 ease^ with atud miE, 

VCEV max f^" 



EPOXY 

rULL WAVE 



SILICON 
BRIDGE I I 
RECTIFIERS 

PtV 2. Amp < jhm43i 

SO Ui.«9 OS.ia 

too n -7» □ .»» 

20O G .99 □ 1.2m 
4O0 G l.lt G 1^90 

«00 □ l.iS a 1*TS 
• DO n 1^99 G 1.99 

looo Q 1.70 G 3.as 

t'iKJt': 2 ampTU-fS ca^e 
6 Amp Va x Va s ^/tfi sn 





SIO. 



I Pi% 7-SCGMlNT 
^ti# READOUTS a 

MAN-4 EQUAL 3 QC 

0*y plus letters. *'■*'*' 
HnapE in l4-piR t>EP 

fiV 10 mm, with dc^imiil 
pamt. Like MAS- t 

$6.S0 



COUNTING 
SYSTEM 



IncJudea SN7 4 90« dec- 
ttrte counter, SN7 475 
Ittteh, SN74'11 BCD de- 
coder driver, O-to-9 
Nixie tube, instryctitiRK. 



I 5117400 
SH7401 
5N74Q2 
$M7403 
SN7404 
SK740S 
SN74QS 
SN7407 
SN740fi 
I SN7409 
! SM7410 
I SN741i 
i SK7413 
$117415 
SN7410 
SM7417 
SN7420 
Sli742l 
5N7422 
SN7426 
$N7430 
SN7432 
Sli74:»7 



^ 

Selediofi TTL lO 

*cli«ft*» Order hv tyi>e numbt^r! St*fc ^hrrls ua re^qucat ' OXLV 



Fietory Marked I 



G SNT43S 
D SM7440 
D SK744L 
n SN7442 
D SI'«744J 

BSN7444 
SN744S 
Q 5li744# 
D SN7447 
n S*«744a 

B 5117450 
SN7451 
O 5M7453 
Q $M74S4 
O SN745S 
Q SI47460 
Q SN7464 

□ SM74S5 
Q $N7470 
D SH747a 
n SN7473 
Q SN7474 
a Sli747« 

□ $Kt7476 
Q SN747e 
n SNT480 




□ SN74at 
D SN74e2 

BSN74S1 
Si«748S 
Q SN746e 
O SN7489 
D SN74M 
DSM7491 
O SM7492 
U SN7493 
D SM7494 
D 5N74t5 
O SW7496 
O $N74100 
D $N74104 
O SK74105 
OSN74108 
D SN74L07 
DSN7410® 
n SN74112 
D SN741t3 

□ 5N741I4 
D S#i7412l 

□ $N74t22 
G SN7412J 
n SN74i40 



INTEGRATED CIRCUIT SOCKET!^ 

Buy Any 3 - Tnke 10% Oltcountl 

U 14- Pin, dual In lln« S.45 
□ 1€-Pin, dual in lino .50 
D TO'S, d or 10 p\nm .29 

WIRE-WIAP 
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT 
SOCKETS n TO* i. 

g 16.Pt n 3 for *2.00 




□ SN74145 
D SW74151 
nSN74lS3 
D SN74154 
QSN74159 
aSN74l56 
DSW74157 
D 5N74tS8 
Q SM74160 
p $Pf74lSl 
U SN741g2 
aSN74l63 
5Nr4164 

□ Sfi74165 
G $N74180 
D5N74181 
DSN74182 
DSN74iS4 
a SN741«5 

n SNr4is2 

a 5N74193 
D Sf474l94 
G $N74195 
D SM74190 
Q 5N741»Q 
O 5N74200 



LINEAR 



m wMCTomr 

OUARAimCB 



Op llflips 



FACT&HT 



S40 

550 



HI tlow r«t« op-mm^ (TO'5} ..... . S2.50 

Pilcro p9W«r 741 f TO-5 K .-■_«». » 2.50 

Micpft p«w*r 709 (TO«5) 2.50 

FET fnput op amp (TO-51 3.95 

PrKiilon 741 (TO^SJ ... ..... 2.50 

70W pwr drfv«r amp (TO-S) ...... 2.04 

Pr«cltlon 723 voitrngm r*s. I DIP} . . . 1.17 



556 




Jyp* 

□ Lnt.aoo 

QLM-301 
l'«l-302 
i-M-304 

^ Lii-aos 

g LM.307 

y UM.30S 

P Lftt-309K 
D tfM-311 

8UVt*320 
LlMt.320 
GLJII^350 
D LW^370 
Q t.M-371 
D LM-^373 

O LM.aeo 



BUY ANY 



3_TA«io% 

P«»cHptiofi 
Voruf. folio*., "^ 

P<»«. V. ^* * 

5up«r 741* **•*''■- 

SV 20O mil V. rSl ■ * • 

ComMrator , ' ' 

WitUi 5V l-,mp v.p.;- 

5". fm: ssb'T 

2*i(vatt 



D 507 

§595 
71 



■ ^■■•p otll«rs TO* 



■F tIrjB 

■■nptlflftr 



SILICON TUBES 



Ul 5114 
n SR4 
G S6S 



51.49 
3.95 
7.95 



Trm«r 2 uS*ci:»idi to t-hr (A| 
5 TiiiMS faft^r t]i«n 74 1 C , 
OuaJ 741 fmtni PIP) .... 
Pb««* loch loop* (DIP! ^ ' 
PHa«* loek loopa CDIPI - 
Plta»a tock loopt (DIP] - - 
P'hmmm lock loops (At ^ ■ ■ ■ 
FuneUofi f«it*rj|or [A) . 
Ton« ^mnmrmto^ f A| < . ^ < . . . 
Four quadraftf fnullfpllvr ^ . , 
02c Hf-p^ln, DC amp (TO-51 , 
G 703C RF.IF. amp, 14 ckii (TO-5| 
G 709C Oparatlonal amp (A\ .... 
G 709CV Op amp Imlnl OiP> . . _. 
D 710C D|tf«f«pti«l amp <A^ .... 

Q 71 IC Dual dlff. comp <A| . 

G 723C Voltair* r*«iilator fA} .... 
G 741 C Fr«quaitcf c^mpantator 
G 74XCV rr*q. eomp 709 (Min 
G 747e Dual 741C (A) ..... 

G 748C Fraq. alfj. 74lC (A) , 

D 74ftCV rr«q, «d). 741C (mli^ DiP^ 
n 709-709 Dual r09C (DIP) ...... 

G 739-739 Dual Ktarao praamp ^ « . . . 
D 741-741 Dual 741C <A) ...,,... 
G 75450 Dual parlpharal drivar I DIP) 
(A) TQ-r^ or [HP duut in liEifi p&k 




709 (A^ 
i DIP> . 



* * « * i 



12-DIOIT 

''CALCULATOR 
ON A CHIP" 




12.95 

3 for $35 



Similar tn Mi^^^te-k nOOl. Outpfrforms Te\iis h- 
difrn TMS1802. A 4 0*pin 1>[P. Adda* muitJplicH* 
subtracts, And divid(*.i. Une with T-segnienl 
rc^adouts, NixieAp and LtliD^^, W« iuelude liche- 
rniilica, in^lrtjctiort?! to hwild calruUitur. 



O CTSOOS 

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HOT MOS FETS 



D2-itOS rCTS, !Hf channel 10k umas :lSl Z8,TO-i «, RCA91 
Q 2- MOS FETS, DUAL GATE, S (.haft., 3Ni«T-l, TU-IW. 51 
a 2-M05 FITS, DUAL &ATE, N Chan . aNl40-l, TO-l», *1 

LED-PHOTO-SOLAR DOLUR STRETCHERS* 

Q 3 —^ "LED5"t viatbte. mEf-ro^miAiAture. axiaJ leads S| 

L. 2 "LEOS". vj-ihl**. jumbii, red. T*>-I ^ f I 

J: I ' — PtiaTO TWAWSISTOil. v^ith dnrrinxUfn amp filter. Ifii^ 51 

J 2 PMOTO TRAM5IST0II5, vi+ili darhnittim amp. 2N! 

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Dvicription 



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LED 4b95 
READOUTS r»V/io'^ 

0-9 plus letters, 
for SN744 6 or SNT4 4 
Stiaps in 14 -pin DIP 
a ISC ke t . ^ '4 X ^ 'a x ^^ ** , 
cha rae tcrs : V4 x ^^ " . 
5V, 20' mil 8 pet^ sfeK- 
ch arac te rs : V* x 3 / 1 6 
Famous MAN-l t>'pe. 
D Sockata .50 ••« 





S2.d5 

^BU) 3 

Tall* iD% 

This dijiplay is excelleni for 
Email portable electironics, 
such ai9 DVM's, caloulatorHp 
etc. Equivalent to Monsanto 
MAN 'A A. Operatee from 5V, 
20 milliampe^^ea, with 4T 
f ohm droppipg resiBtor, 



a 5311 28jpiti, ctramle, anr raatfcmt, 
6-dEcltsj A«e.O 
24- pi 11, cftrsmJc, aay r«adout« 
4*dJs»tft: C-D 

f *if ^^' cjrimJe, aay rudout. 

O'OinitSr! A*C 

24-prR, plattJc, LID and 

ineafid««c*nt rtiid-wta. 

e.d|ffllt;A-B 

*' 5 — 5^^"^ Coyoi. C — 1 PPS Output, 
S- — Output SlrQl>f. O BCD 



512.88 
$12.fiS 
512.8« 
5i2.Bt 



I* if / 

Hew 







Potter & Bruinfiold 

KAP RELAYS 



J !•# tT,iO 
VAC- 



$2.98 




LED MITY DIOITS 

tf^ ^tf^ OlRltal 

•f KSIW Counting 

m9 M m Moduui 



INCLUDES PX. EDO! 
CONNECTOR — FRECl 



Qll» "- □ 12 VOC 
Excellent for "HAM** Use lui jintcnrtiL a witching^ latrhinfCi 
transiriit, receive, etc.^ and lOO's oj cuirutierciiU or in* 
duBtriai u^cs. fneJudes plastic duiit-€pver wLtii diafr^m. 
and hcKjkup inla, ll-pin plug-in basa. Contacta movable- 
irold flashed aiWer, ataUojiiLry overlay, with silver cad* 
mium Qjtide movable! . All contact* 10 amp SPOT. Coil 
daU,L15VAG 2260 oiuM. 17,6 ma, 12 VUC 21 miU 
168 Dhma. Sii#i 2iA* x I 5/1 S'*. Wt, 4 oia, CeDte-r pits 
miseinE-. Comar Mfir. ifp* atiual too, mT 




Will outp^rfprm hjh' rjtUrr 
DCM aa %hz marktft ludtiy, 
not ^aseauB, not incand^ lu- 
cent, but 3. device that wi!] 
READ aLinoit for life, MAN* 
4, MabQanto equal. 

Kit includfrii: 3 x 2^* printed 
ciit board. wUh fln- 

gerfl tool Side-mnunUng' 
aack«t, MAN-4 reniHt^im, 
14-iB, 7475, 74tf0, booklflt, 



Termt! mid pfjstaKP flatadt net 30 

Phona Ordc^rK; Wuktf field, Mass. I B 1 7 I 24fV*.lH2D 
Retail I le-l^ Owl Carmine St,, Wakefield, Ma»». 
<oif Water Street J C.O,0/S MAY &fc: PHONl^O 



|D TIC C*T*lOa on mtf optics. 'lCs\ Stmi's. Pafls 

POLY PAKS 



P.O.BOX SAX A. LVNNflELD.MASS. O1S40 



142 



73 MAGAZINE 



I 



p 



LU 



CIRCUITS 



SWI 



Tl 



M7V 



A O- 



ev 



WLOT LIGHT 
01 



F 



-*Viftr 



Rl 



-*<A^r- 



150V 



Re 

CI 



I 



C8 






fl o- 



1 J "y y 






A protection circuit that wiJ/ turn off the high 
voltage power supply in a linear amplifier when 
bias voltage fails. Dl, 400 piv J^; Rl, lOQ IW; 
R2, IK 2W: R3 depends on relay voltage; CI and 
C2, 4 fJiF ZOOV- Points A + B go to the 117V 
primary of the high voltage transformer. The relay 
should have adequate contact ratings to handle the 
transformer current, 

CODE m 



lOK 




NOISE IN 

33 K 




K>K 



I2K 




/v7 



A code practice audio mixer: Feed code into one 
input and random CW noise from the Novice bands 
into the other while adjusting the controls for a 
realistic sound. 



+ 9 VOLTS 

100 i/F 



RATIO 



OETCCTOe ipF >5fOK 



OUTPUT 




A simple audio amplifier that is suitable for a 
compact FM receiver. It can also be built entirely 

self-contained in a minibox with speaker and 
battery for experimental purposes. From RCA 
Linear Integrated Circuits manual. 



I 




In this issue, do you think there is a need for 
more 





Yes 


No 


Simple construction projects 


D 


n 


Complex construction projects 


n 


n 


General interest articles 


n 


n 


Humor articles 


D 


n 


Specialized columns 


a 


n 


Operating news 


a 


n 



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Comment (b): 



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Comment (d): 



Do you receive 73 from subscription 

newsstand 



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JUNE 1973 



143 



READER SERVICE 



PROPAGATION CHART 



Please either tear out this list of advertisers and send ft 
in to 73 with as many boxes checked off as you would 
like to see brochures, data sheets or catalogs ... or 
else make a copy and send that in. Include your zip 
code, please. 



ADVERTISER INDEX JUNE 1973 



n Adirondack 129 D 

D AFS 90 D 

* Amat. Whol. Elec. 125 D 

D Antenna Spec, Cover I! D 



D A&W 130 



a 
p 

n 
a 

□ 
a 
□ 
n 



ATV 90 
D Babylon 128 
D Bomar 52 
n Clegg 33, 41 
n Com Craft 116 
D ComSpec 89 
n Control Signal 77 

□ Cornell Elec. 90 
n Data Engin. 114, 115 
n DuPage 94 

□ Eimac 121 

□ Electronic Dist* 133 
n Erickson 42 

□ Exceltronics 135 
D Fair 89 
n Freck 86 
Q Gam 123 
D Gateway 58 
D Gen. Aviation 22 
n G&F 86 
D G&G 141 
D GLB Elec, 32 
D Gregorv 68,69 
n Hamtronics 34,35,118,0 
n Hanifin 134 119 D 
D Heath 44, 45 
D Henry 18, 19 
D Hy-Gain 106, 107, 
D ICOM 122 110, 111 



a 

n 

n 
a 

n 

D 
D 



D 
D 
D 



73 



Jan 58 

Janel 52 

Juge 112 

Larsen 60 

Linear Systems 36 

Mann 113 

Meshna 124, 138, 139 

MFJ 90 

The Milliwatt 32 

Morgain 89 

Newtronics 39 

Palomar 52 

Poly Paks 142 

Regency 26 

Rohn 62 

RP Electronics 120 

Savoy Cover ! 1 1 

Sentry 1 1 

Schober 32 

Solid State 140 

Spectrosonics 77 

Standard Comm, 5 

Tel rex 54 

Unidyne 117 

Vaipey 28 

VHF Enging. 126, 127 

Vibropfex 90 

Waller 137 

Webster 131 

Windjammer 136 

P.Wood 132 

World QSL 90 

Yaesu 1 5 

Stuff 

Bookshop 102; 103 

Subscriptions 101 
0073 101 



Coupon expires in 60 days » * „ . 

•Reader service inquiries not soltcfted^ Correspond 

directly to company. JUNE 1973 

Mall to: 

Reader's Service 
73 Inc., Peterborough NH 03458 

Please Print or Type 



Name 



Call 



J.H. Nelson 
Good (Open) Fair ( D ) Poor (O) 

une 1973 



J' 



SUN MON TUES WED THUR 



FRI 



3 4 



10 




24 










1 


5 


® 


7 


8 

1 


12 


13 


14 


15 





SAT 



2 

9 
16 



22 23 



M 



26 21 28 29 30 



Address, 
City 





























EASTERN UNITED STATES 


; TO: 1 




GMT: DO 02 04 06 oe 10 i3t u ifi is » 22 




— 

ALASKA 




14 


? 


T 7 


7 




7 


7 


}A 


7A 


'*ij 




AftCENTINA 




14 


14 


7 


1 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


14A 


14^ 




AUSTRALIA 




14 


7A 


TB 


7 


7 




1 


7 


7 


1* 






CAAIAL ZONE 




14 


7 


7 


7 


7 




14 


14 


14 


14A 


14A 




EWJLANO 




7A 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


t«A 


t4A 


14 


14 






HAMAII 




14 


7A 


7 


7 


7 




7 


7 


14 


14 






mo\A 




7S 


/S 


7B 


7B 


7B 


78 


U 


14 


14 


14 






JAPAN 




14 


? 


7 


7 


7 1 




7 


7 


7 


7A 






MEXICO 




14 


14 


7 


J 


7 




7A 


7A 


14 


14 






t«H[L1PPIN£& 




7A 


FB 


78 


TB 


7H 




7 


7 


7 


7A 






PUERTO RICO 




TA 


7 


7 


7 


7 




7 


14 


14 


14 






SOUTH Af^RICA 


7B 


J 


7 


7 


?S 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


14 


7S 71 




li. s.s. J^. 


Tfl. 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


1* 


7A 




WEST COAST 


14 


14 


7 


7 


? 


7 




7 


U 


14 


14 


14 




CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: 




ALASKA 


M ,»| 


JA 7 


7 








7 


7A 


7A 






AftCEin'INA 




14 


14 7A 


f 






14 


14 


14 


t4A 


14A 




AUSTHALIA 




T4 ' 


14 


7 


7 








7 


7 


14 


i 




€AliAL 20Ht 




14 


14 


7 


1 
7 






14 


M 


14 


14A 


14A 




£MGiJ^ND 




14 


7 


7 


7 








t4 


14A 


14 






HAWAII 




14A 


14 


7A 


7 








14 


14 


14 






tMDIA 




7A 


7B 


7S 


7B 


7B 


7B 




14 


14 


14 






JAPAN 




14 


14 


7 


7 








7 


7 


7 






MEXICO 




14 


7 


f 


7 






^ 


7 


7A 


14 






PMILIPmNES 




14 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 






7 


7 


7A 






PifERTORICO 




11 


14 


7 


7 






14 


14 


14 


14 






SOIiTH AFRICA 


Ttt 


F 


7 


7 


7B 


m 


14 


14 


14 


14 


7B 


m 




U S.S. R. 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


7 






7 \u 


14 


14 


7A 






S TO: 




WESTERN UNITED SI 


ATEI 




ALASKA 




14 


T4 




T 








7 




7 






ARGENTINA 




14 


14 


14 


1 






14 


14 


14 


14A 


t4A 




AUSTRALIA 




ii 


21 


1* 


14 








7 










CANAL ZONE 




14 


14 




1 


-t 




14 


14 










ENGLAtiO 




14 


7 




7 








14 










HAWAII 


14A 


14A 


14A 


14 


14 


14 






14 










INDIA 




14 


14 


7S 


7B 


7i 


?B 




7 










JAPAN 




14 


14 


14 


1* 








7 










MEXICO 




14 


7 




7 






7A 


7A 










PHlLlPPINfS 




14 


14 


14 


14 


7B 




1 '' 


7 










PUERTO RICO 




14 


14 




7 






7A 


14 










SOUTH AFRICA 




7 


1 


-g 


7B 


79 


7B 


7B 


7A 




TB 






U. S.S. R. 


1 '^*- 


7 


7 




7 








1« 


1"* 


7A 


lA 




EAST COAST 


14 


14 


'1 ' 


7 








14 




14 


14 





State 



Zip, 



A = Next higher frequency may be useful also, 
B = Difficult circuit this period. 



144 



73 MAGAZINE 





. BASSETT 
I 

.gh efficiency mobife 
Id portable antennas 
r all amateur bands, 
V, MARS, CB, 
pCURITY. 
pBLIC SERVICE, 
ARINE, AND 
VERNMENT USL 



2-6-10-15-20-40-75 

Identical size, cost, 
and appearance 

FULLY ADJUSTABLE 
TO FREQUENCY 
IN FIELD 

Low weight, low drag, 
high strength 
fiberglass 

Polished 

chrome brass 
standard %-24 thread 

High gain cojlinear 
on 2 meters 



MODEL DGA-2M 

$29.50 postpaid 

in U.S.A. 



Savoy 



PostparcJ In U.S.A 



1 



TYPE 900 A 



TYPE 901 




HIGH ACCURACY CRYSTALS 

FOR OVER 30 YEARS 

Efther type for amateur VHF in Regency, Swan, Standard, Drake, Vari- 
tronics, Tempo, Yaesu, Galaxy, Trio, Sonar, Clegg, SBE, Genave. 

Quotes on request for amateur or commercial crystals for use In all 
other equipments. 

Specify crystal type, frequency, make of equipment and whether transmit 
or receive when orderin£. 



BASSETT VACUUM BALUN 



« 



sSF? 



'^■H lit|,^„.. 





BASSETT VACUUM TRAP AHTENNA SYSTEM 

Complete packaged multi-band antenna sys- 
tems einpbying the famous Bassett Sealed 
Resonators and Balun from whxh air has 
been removed and replaced with pyre 
helium at one atmosphere. Operating hands 
are indicated by model designation. 

MODEL DGA^4075 _ . . $59.50 

MODEl DGA-204075 . . $79.50 

MODEL DGA 2040 . $59,50 

MODEL OGA'l 52040 . . $79.50 



The famous sealed helium filled Barun , , . 
employed with the DQA Series Antenna 
Systems. Solderless center insulator and 
easily handles more than tuH legal power 
whife reducing unwanted coai radiation. 
Equipped with a special SO 239 type coax 
connector and available either 1:1 or 4:1. 

MODEL DGA-2000-B .. $12.95 
Postpaid in U,5.A, 






CONTACT YOUR DISTRIBUTOR OR WRITE FOR DATA 

~ lect:ronicsJnc. 

P.O. Box 71S7 - Fort: Lauderdale, Florida - 33304 

Tel: 305-56e-B416 or 305-34"7-nS1 



M» 




"WHERE THE 



magazine 

for radio amateurs 





— David Bradley, Pre», Linear Systems 




FCC FM DOWNERS 

Though details are tacking, the 
FCC has just announced that rennote 
base operators may not operate mobile 

- thus essentially putting a halt to 
remote base operation. This "interpre- 
tation" of the rules will put off a great 
many of the most innovative and 
progressive of amateur groups - fur- 
ther bringing to a halt the advances of 
amateur radio. Lew McCoy W1ICP of 
QST read the announcement at the 
Dayton Hamvention, calling the new 
rules "asinine." 

In a second bombshell the Commis- 
sion announced a new guideline for 
repeater license applications — not 
more than six control operators per 
repeater! This means that on the 
average each operator must be respon* 
sible for 28 hours of monitoring per 
week! This appears to be another 
harassing move on the part of the 
Commission to try and force repeaters 
off the air. 

Prose Walker sure must have it in 
for repeaters and experimenters - he 
could hardly make it more difficult 
for them. 

NEW CB PROJECT 

As a fitting follov^up to the two 
recent CB projects published in 73, 
the first with tuning CB rigs and the 
second with a remote tuning oscillator 

— in this issue we have a beautiful 
addition to any CB station. , .see page 
12. 



ANTENNA SPECIAL 

This issue of 73 features antennas 
— including a miniature 40/80m an- 
tenna, a triband quad, the inside 
scoop on reflected power, double co- 
axial antenna, etc. 



FCC REGULATIONS 

Starting in this issue 73 Magazine 
will Dubltsh the up-to-date FCC ama- 
teur regulations. These regs have been 
changing so rapidly of late that few 
amateurs have a copy of the latest 
Part 97: A recent poll of amateurs 
indicated that less than 5% of them 
had copies of the complete FCC regs 
and since a knowledge of them is not 
only required but is important in 
these days of rapid changes, 73 is 
going to publish them. 



READERS PROTECTED 

Currently advertising is not being 
accepted from quite a few companies 
pending answers to serious questions 
involving orders being delayed beyond 
reason, equipment that is junky, un- 
supported performance claims, im- 
minent bankruptcy, and things like 
that We have no intention of getting 
sued by naming names — but if you 
see some company advertise and then 
suddenly no more ads — be wary. Two 
FM, two antenna, and two surplus 
outfits have been dropped in the last 
few months. These are all advertising 
elsewhere, by the way, so watch out! 



THE AVIS COMPLEX? 

It really Hertz to be number two, 
but the 73 staff is a game bunch.and 

everyone is working diligently toward 
gettiog out of second place ici ham 
circulation. The ad department has 
already broken through into number 
one spot and we're gung-ho to try and 
pass our aged rival, QST, in circula- 
tion. If having more articles and more 
news will do it, perhaps we're on our 
way. 



65% MORE ADS IN 73 

More ads than what? Well, during 
the last six months 73 has run more 
pages of ads than any other ham 
magazine . . . and by a wide margin. 
Big deal, you say? Okay, it is a big 
deal — for not only does this mean a 
lot more moqey to make 73 a bigger 
magazine, it also means that if you are 
looking for something (and you 
should be), you will have a much 
better chance of finding it in 73 than 
anywhere else — so check in 73 first 
Now, about that 65% you've been 
asking about — that's how many more 
ads 73 has had than your favorite and 
ours, QST. 



FCC INSTRUCTIONS 

Never has the FCC generated such 
an unbelievable mess — outside of 
their crowning achievement, the citi 
zens band. The latest FCC release to 
"help" FMers through the wonderland 
of repeater and control station appli- 
cations is on page 46, 



CLUB OFFER 

Tests of the new 75 club offertiave 
demonstrated M to be one of the best 
club treasury fillers ever invented! The 
deal is so spectacular that rarely does 
even one club member p^s it up - see 
page 4. 

BEST SSTV BOOK 

It is also the only slow scan book 
published. Read all about this in- 
credible book that you will hate your- 
self if you don't get it right away on 
page 102, 

REPEATER ATLAS 

If you travel more than a few miles 
from home you will want to take one 
of the Atlas of FM Ftepesters of the 
World with you. If you don't travel 
more than a few miles from home, get 
on the stick! More dope on that atlas 
on page 82* 



AUTHOR'S BONANZA 

The better the articles the better 
the ham magazine — this fs the con- 
cept at 73 and the result is that the 
editors try very hard to attract the 
best of authors. 

Among the attractions that keep 
the top authors writing for 73 are the 
best pay rate for articles in the indus- 
try — the pay for the articles is made 
upon acceptance, not months or even 
years after publication (or even 
never) - the author has every oppor- 
tunity to check and recheck his article 
as it is being prepared for publica- 
tion — and finally, the author gets by 
far the widest possible readership for 
his article. 

We're working on a scheme to have 
some little extras for our authors who 
specialize in good construction pro- 
jects - stuff like IC's - soldering irons 
- alt kinds of small parts — jacks — 
plugs - connectors — like that. It's 
the little parts that mount up in the 
long run for builders - you don't find 
5rf jacks much anymore - and mini- 
ature switches can run a dollar! 

You know, there are so many nice 
things to build these days, that a 
hardened experimenter hardly knov^ 
which way to turn. The new ICs invite 
QRP rigs, instant receivers, timers, 
identifiers, clocks, contest code 
memory units, car alarms, stuff. 



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